Publications by authors named "Vibha Shrivastava"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Phosphorylation of threonine 3 on histone H3 by haspin kinase is required for meiosis I in mouse oocytes.

J Cell Sci 2014 Dec 14;127(Pt 23):5066-78. Epub 2014 Oct 14.

Department of Genetics, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA

Meiosis I (MI), the division that generates haploids, is prone to errors that lead to aneuploidy in females. Haspin is a kinase that phosphorylates histone H3 on threonine 3, thereby recruiting Aurora kinase B (AURKB) and the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) to kinetochores to regulate mitosis. Haspin and AURKC, an AURKB homolog, are enriched in germ cells, yet their significance in regulating MI is not fully understood. Using inhibitors and overexpression approaches, we show a role for haspin during MI in mouse oocytes. Haspin-perturbed oocytes display abnormalities in chromosome morphology and alignment, improper kinetochore-microtubule attachments at metaphase I and aneuploidy at metaphase II. Unlike in mitosis, kinetochore localization remained intact, whereas the distribution of the CPC along chromosomes was absent. The meiotic defects following haspin inhibition were similar to those observed in oocytes where AURKC was inhibited, suggesting that the correction of microtubule attachments during MI requires AURKC along chromosome arms rather than at kinetochores. Our data implicate haspin as a regulator of the CPC and chromosome segregation during MI, while highlighting important differences in how chromosome segregation is regulated between MI and mitosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.158840DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4248095PMC
December 2014

Cigarette smoke affects posttranslational modifications and inhibits capacitation-induced changes in human sperm proteins.

Reprod Toxicol 2014 Jan 15;43:125-9. Epub 2013 Dec 15.

Department of Biology, Stern College, Yeshiva University, New York, NY, United States; Department of Developmental and Molecular Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Yeshiva University, Bronx, New York, United States. Electronic address:

Sperm are highly dependent on posttranslational modifications of proteins. Massive phosphorylation on tyrosine residue is required for sperm capacitation. Sumoylation has also been recently implicated in spermatogenesis and sperm functions. Cigarette smoke is known to cause oxidative stress in different tissues, and several studies suggest that it causes oxidative stress in sperm. Whether tobacco affects posttranslational modifications in human sperm is currently unknown. In this study, we show that a short exposure of human sperm to physiological concentrations of cigarette smoke extract (CSE) causes the partial de-sumoylation of many sperm proteins. Furthermore, the presence of a low concentration of CSE in the human tubal fluid during an induction of in vitro capacitation inhibits the capacitation-associated increase in protein phosphorylation. Collectively, changes in posttranslational modifications may be one of the mechanisms through which exposure to tobacco can negatively affect sperm functions and cause fertility problems.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.reprotox.2013.12.001DOI Listing
January 2014

Localization and identification of sumoylated proteins in human sperm: excessive sumoylation is a marker of defective spermatozoa.

Hum Reprod 2013 Jan 17;28(1):210-23. Epub 2012 Oct 17.

Department of Biology, Stern College, Yeshiva University, 245 Lexington Avenue, New York, NY 10016, USA.

Background: Sumoylation is a type of post-translational modification that is implicated in the regulation of numerous cellular events. However, its role in the function of human sperm has not yet been characterized.

Methods And Results: In this study, both immunofluorescence and electron microscopy revealed that small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMO) SUMO1 and SUMO2/3 were highly enriched in the neck area of human sperm that is associated with the redundant nuclear envelope and were also detectable in the flagella and some head regions. Similar localization patterns of SUMO were also observed in mouse and fly sperm. Nonmotile, two-tailed, curled tailed, misshapen, microcephalic (small head) and aciphalic (no head) sperm exhibited abnormally high levels of sumoylation in their neck and tail regions relative to normal sperm. Numerous sumoylated proteins, ranging from 20 to 260 kDa, were detected via western blotting and identified by mass spectrometry, and 55 SUMO targets that were present specifically in human sperm, and not in the control fraction, corresponded to flagella proteins, proteins involved in the maturation and differentiation of sperm, heat shock proteins and important glycolytic and mitochondrial enzymes. The targets that were identified included proteins with specific functions in germ cells and sperm, such as heat shock-related 70-kDa protein 2, outer dense fiber protein 3, A-kinase anchor proteins 3 and 4, L-lactate dehydrogenase C, sperm protein associated with the nucleus on the X chromosome B/F, valosin-containing protein, seminogelins, histone H4 and ubiquitin. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments confirmed the sumoylation of semenogelin and indicated that some sperm proteins are modified by sumoylation and ubiquitination simultaneously.

Conclusions: Numerous proteins are modified by sumoylation in human sperm; excessive sumoylation is a marker of defective spermatozoa.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/humrep/des317DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3522414PMC
January 2013

SUMO proteins are involved in the stress response during spermatogenesis and are localized to DNA double-strand breaks in germ cells.

Reproduction 2010 Jun 12;139(6):999-1010. Epub 2010 Apr 12.

Department of Biology, Stern College for Women, Yeshiva University, 245 Lexington Avenue, New York, New York 10016, USA.

Small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMO) proteins have been implicated in cellular stress response in different tissues, but whether sumoylation has a similar role during spermatogenesis is currently unknown. In this study, changes in the levels of both free SUMO isoforms and high-molecular weight (HMW) SUMO conjugates were monitored before and after the induction of different types of cellular stresses. Using cell lines and primary cells freshly isolated from mouse testes, significant changes were detected in the levels of SUMO1 and SUMO2/3 conjugates following short exposure of the cells to heat stress and oxidative stress. While high concentrations of H(2)O(2) caused an increase in protein sumoylation, low concentrations of H(2)O(2) mostly caused protein desumoylation. Immunofluorescence studies localized SUMO to the sites of DNA double-strand breaks in stressed germ cells and during meiotic recombination. To study the effect of oxidative stress in vivo, animals exposed to tobacco smoke for 12 weeks were used. Changes in sumoylation of HMW proteins were consistent with their oxidative damage in the tobacco-exposed mice. Our results are consistent with the important roles of different SUMO isoforms in stress responses in germ cells. Furthermore, this study identified topoisomerase 2 alpha as one of the targets of sumoylation during normal spermatogenesis and under stress.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1530/REP-09-0492DOI Listing
June 2010

Differential expression patterns of SUMO proteins in HL-60 cancer cell lines support a role for sumoylation in the development of drug resistance.

Cell Tissue Res 2009 May 27;336(2):277-86. Epub 2009 Mar 27.

Stern College for Women, Department of Biology, Yeshiva University, New York, NY 10016, USA.

Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) proteins are involved in a variety of cellular processes. Alterations in SUMO conjugation have been implicated in several human diseases, including cancer. Although the main cause of failure in cancer treatment is the development of drug resistance by cancer cells, the mechanisms of drug resistance are not fully understood. SUMO proteins are thought to play roles in various cellular pathways, but no studies have as yet compared the expression of the different SUMO proteins in chemosensitive and drug-resistant cancer cells. To determine the relationship between protein sumoylation and drug resistance, the expression of various SUMO isoforms has been studied and compared in the HL-60 cell line (a model for leukemic cells) and in HL-60RV cells (resistant to vincristine). Co-immunostaining of cells by anti-SUMO antibodies and antibodies against various nuclear subdomains has been examined by an advanced type of bioimaging analysis. Whereas SUMO-2/3 co-localizes exclusively with nuclear bodies containing promyelocytic leukemia protein in both cell types, SUMO-1 has also been seen in nucleolar regions of HL-60, but not in HL-60RV, cells. In HL-60 cells, SUMO-1 occurs adjacent to, but not co-localized with, the nucleolar marker fibrillarin. Western blot analysis has revealed higher levels of free SUMO and sumoylated products in drug-resistant cells and the presence of specific SUMO-1 conjugates in drug-sensitive HL-60 cells, possibly consistent with a specific nucleolar signal. Shortly after the induction of ethanol and oxidative stress, HL-60RV, but not HL-60, cells show increased accumulation of high-molecular-weight SUMO-2/3 conjugates. Thus, SUMO-1 probably has a specific role in the nucleoli of HL-60 cells, and the alteration of sumoylation might be a contributing factor in the development of drug resistance in leukemia cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00441-009-0775-0DOI Listing
May 2009

99mTc-Tetraethylenepentamine-Folate--a new 99mTc-based folate derivative for the detection of folate receptor positive tumors: synthesis and biological evaluation.

Cancer Biol Ther 2004 Oct 2;3(10):995-1001. Epub 2004 Oct 2.

Division of Radiopharmaceuticals and Radiation Biology, Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences, Delhi, India.

A new radiopharmaceutical, 99mTc-Tetraethylenepentamine(TEPA)-Folate has been synthesized introducing TEPA to the gamma-carboxyl group of folic acid. This binds with 99mTc high efficiency at ambient temperature. The resulting 99mTc-N5-Folate is stable under physiological conditions at least for 24 h after radiocomplexation. TEPA is a known open chain pentamine (N5) chelator, its four-nitrogen act as the binding site for 99mTc. The folate membrane receptor binding of the 99mTc-TEPA-Folate by established human tumor cell lines (KB, U-87MG and MDA-MB-468) showed Kd in microM range in normal DMEM (10% serum, 10 microM folic acid). The blood kinetic studies showed more than 70% clearance within five minutes from the circulation. The KB cell line tumors in mice were readily identifiable in the gamma images and revealed major accumulation of radiotracer in liver, kidneys and intestines. High tumor uptake was shown in the tumor bearing nude mice; tumorto-blood ratios reached 2.68 +/- 0.52 and 5.5 +/- 1.47 at 1 and 4 h after post injection respectively. Surviving fractions as obtained in clonogenic assay were 1.02 +/- 0.07 and 1.03 +/- 0.05 in U-87MG and MDA-MB-468 cell lines respectively. The 99mTc-N5-Folate conjugate have promising utility as a receptor specific radiopharmaceutical for imaging neoplastic tissues known to over express folate-binding protein.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4161/cbt.3.10.1138DOI Listing
October 2004
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