Publications by authors named "Veronica Cavalletti"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Perfectionism unbound: An integrated individual and group intervention for those hiding imperfections.

J Clin Psychol 2022 Apr 29. Epub 2022 Apr 29.

Perfectionism and Psychopathology Lab, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

The tendency to hide and mask suffering and one's perceived imperfections is one of the biggest obstacles in treating those with prominent perfectionistic traits. In this single case, we present an integrative form of psychotherapy for patients with recurrent strategies aimed at neither displaying nor disclosing their perfectionism. Emily was a 26-year-old woman diagnosed with Major Depressive Disorder and reported a personality pathology as diagnosed through the Alternative Model of Personality Disorders. The intervention comprised of a 4-month individual therapy and 2-month group therapy. The former is based on Metacognitive Interpersonal Therapy protocol for personality disorders. The latter is a protocol that integrates the Dynamic Relational Treatment for Perfectionism and Compassion Focused Therapy. At the end of this integrative treatment, Emily remitted from Major Depressive Disorder and personality pathology. Further studies should confirm our promising results in larger samples.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jclp.23365DOI Listing
April 2022

A case study on a severe paranoid personality disorder client treated with metacognitive interpersonal therapy.

J Clin Psychol 2021 08 15;77(8):1807-1820. Epub 2021 Jul 15.

Center for Metacognitive Interpersonal Therapy, Rome, Italy.

Paranoid personality disorder (PPD) is a severe condition, lacking specialized and empirically supported treatment. To provide the clinician with insights into how to treat this condition, we present a case study of a 61-year-old man with severe PPD who presented with ideas of persecution, emotionally charged hostility, and comorbid antisocial personality disorder. The client was treated with 6 months of Metacognitive Interpersonal Therapy, which included: creating a shared formulation of his paranoid attitudes; trying to change his inner self-image of self-as-inadequate and his interpersonal schemas where he saw the others as threatening. Guided imagery and rescripting techniques, coupled with behavioral experiments, were used to promote a change. At the end of the therapy the client reported a reliable change in general symptomatology and, specifically, in interpersonal sensitivity, hostility, and paranoid ideation; he could no longer be diagnosed as PPD and only some paranoid and antisocial characteristics remained.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jclp.23201DOI Listing
August 2021

Psychometric Properties of the Italian Version of the Young Schema Questionnaire L-3: Preliminary Results.

Front Psychol 2018 27;9:312. Epub 2018 Mar 27.

School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Università degli Studi 'G. d'Annunzio' Chieti - Pescara, Chieti, Italy.

Schema Therapy (ST) is a well-known approach for the treatment of personality disorders. This therapy integrates different theories and techniques into an original and systematic treatment model. The Young Schema Questionnaire L-3 (YSQ-L3) is a self-report instrument, based on the ST model, designed to assess 18 Early Maladaptive Schemas (EMSs). During the last decade, it has been translated and validated in different countries and languages. This study aims to establish the psychometric properties of the Italian Version of the YSQ-L3. We enrolled two groups: a clinical ( = 148) and a non-clinical one ( = 918). We investigated the factor structure, reliability and convergent validity with anxiety and depression between clinical and non-clinical groups. The results highlighted a few relevant findings. Cronbach's alpha showed significant values for all the schemas. All of the factor models do not seem highly adequate, even if the hierarchical model has proven to be the most significant one. Furthermore, the questionnaire confirms the ability to discriminate between clinical and non-clinical groups and could represent a useful tool in the clinical practice. Limitations and future directions are discussed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2018.00312DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5880909PMC
March 2018

Comorbid Personality Disorders in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Its Symptom Dimensions.

Psychiatr Q 2016 Jun;87(2):365-76

Institute of Behavioral and Cognitive Psychology and Psychotherapy, Via Mannelli 139, 50132, Florence, Italy.

The current paper was aimed at: (1) investigating the comorbidity between obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and personality disorders (PDs) using an OCD sample and clinician-administered structured interviews; (2) exploring the associations of different cluster comorbid PDs with the specific symptom dimensions of OCD; (3) analyzing the variables which could play a significant role in the probability of having at least one comorbid PD, controlling for confounding variables. The SCID-II and Y-BOCS, together with a series of self-report measures of OCD, depression and anxiety symptoms were administered to a clinical sample of 159 patients with a primary diagnosis of OCD. 20.8 % of the participants suffered from at least one comorbid PD; the most common was obsessive-compulsive PD (9.4 %), followed by narcissistic PD (6.3 %). In OCD patients with comorbid cluster C PDs, the percentage of responsibility for harm, injury, or bad luck symptoms was significantly greater than other OCD symptom dimensions (p < .005). Logistic regression found some evidence supporting the association between severity of OCD symptoms and comorbid PDs. PDs are prevalent among Italian people with OCD and should be routinely assessed, as comorbidity may affect help-seeking behaviour and response to treatment.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11126-015-9393-zDOI Listing
June 2016
-->