Publications by authors named "Vadim Pinskiy"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Frequency-selective control of cortical and subcortical networks by central thalamus.

Elife 2015 Dec 10;4:e09215. Epub 2015 Dec 10.

Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, United States.

Central thalamus plays a critical role in forebrain arousal and organized behavior. However, network-level mechanisms that link its activity to brain state remain enigmatic. Here, we combined optogenetics, fMRI, electrophysiology, and video-EEG monitoring to characterize the central thalamus-driven global brain networks responsible for switching brain state. 40 and 100 Hz stimulations of central thalamus caused widespread activation of forebrain, including frontal cortex, sensorimotor cortex, and striatum, and transitioned the brain to a state of arousal in asleep rats. In contrast, 10 Hz stimulation evoked significantly less activation of forebrain, inhibition of sensory cortex, and behavioral arrest. To investigate possible mechanisms underlying the frequency-dependent cortical inhibition, we performed recordings in zona incerta, where 10, but not 40, Hz stimulation evoked spindle-like oscillations. Importantly, suppressing incertal activity during 10 Hz central thalamus stimulation reduced the evoked cortical inhibition. These findings identify key brain-wide dynamics underlying central thalamus arousal regulation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09215DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4721962PMC
December 2015

High-Throughput Method of Whole-Brain Sectioning, Using the Tape-Transfer Technique.

PLoS One 2015 16;10(7):e0102363. Epub 2015 Jul 16.

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York, United States of America.

Cryostat sectioning is a popular but labor-intensive method for preparing histological brain sections. We have developed a modification of the commercially available CryoJane tape collection method that significantly improves the ease of collection and the final quality of the tissue sections. The key modification involves an array of UVLEDs to achieve uniform polymerization of the glass slide and robust adhesion between the section and slide. This report presents system components and detailed procedural steps, and provides examples of end results; that is, 20 μm mouse brain sections that have been successfully processed for routine Nissl, myelin staining, DAB histochemistry, and fluorescence. The method is also suitable for larger brains, such as rat and monkey.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0102363PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4504703PMC
April 2016

A low-cost technique to cryo-protect and freeze rodent brains, precisely aligned to stereotaxic coordinates for whole-brain cryosectioning.

J Neurosci Methods 2013 Sep 29;218(2):206-13. Epub 2013 Mar 29.

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York, USA.

A major challenge in the histological sectioning of brain tissue is achieving accurate alignment in the standard coronal, horizontal, or sagittal planes. Correct alignment is desirable for ease of subsequent analysis and is a prerequisite for computational registration and algorithm-based quantification of experimental data. We have developed a simple and low-cost technique for whole-brain cryosectioning of rodent brains that reliably results in a precise alignment of stereotactic coordinates. The system utilises a 3-D printed model of a mouse brain to create a tailored cavity that is used to align and support the brain during freezing. The alignment of the frozen block is achieved in relation to the fixed edge of the mold. The system also allows for two brains to be frozen and sectioned simultaneously. System components, procedural steps, and examples of the end results are presented.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jneumeth.2013.03.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4265468PMC
September 2013

Epithelial sodium channel is regulated by SNAP-23/syntaxin 1A interplay.

Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2006 May 24;343(4):1279-85. Epub 2006 Mar 24.

Center for Cell and Molecular Biology, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ 07030, USA.

Sodium-selective amiloride-sensitive epithelial channel (ENaC) located in the apical membrane is involved in the reabsorption of sodium in tight epithelia. The soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive attachment receptors (SNAREs) mediate vesicle trafficking in a variety of cell systems. Syntaxin (a t-SNARE) has been shown to interact with and functionally regulate a number of ion channels including ENaC. In this study, we investigated the role of SNAP-23, another SNARE protein, on ENaC activity in the HT-29 colonic epithelial cell system and Xenopus oocytes. Recording of amiloride-sensitive currents in both systems suggest that SNAP-23 modulates channel function, though a much higher concentration is required to inhibit ENaC in Xenopus oocytes. The introduction of Botulinum toxin A (a neurotoxin which cleaves SNAP-23), but not Botulinum toxin B or heat-inactivated Botulinum toxin A, reversed the inhibitory effect of SNAP-23 on amiloride-sensitive currents. However, syntaxin 1A and SNAP-23 combined portray a complex scenario that suggests that this channel interacts within a quaternary complex. Synaptotagmin expression neither interacts with, nor showed any effect on amiloride-sensitive currents when co-expressed with ENaC. Pull down assays suggest mild interaction between ENaC and SNAP-23, which gets stronger in the presence of syntaxin 1A. Data further suggest that SNAP-23 possibly interacts with the N-terminal alphaENaC. These functional and biochemical approaches provide evidence for a complex relationship between ENaC and the exocytotic machinery. Our data suggest that SNARE protein interplay defines the fine regulation of sodium channel function.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.03.093DOI Listing
May 2006