Publications by authors named "Trond F Aarre"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Ny tvangslovgjeving – nokre oppklaringar.

Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen 2021 Nov 4;141(17). Epub 2021 Nov 4.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4045/tidsskr.21.0756DOI Listing
November 2021

Serotonin or society?

Authors:
Trond F Aarre

Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen 2018 06 26;138(11). Epub 2018 Jun 26.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4045/tidsskr.18.0209DOI Listing
June 2018

Tankevekkjande om livet som psykiater.

Authors:
Trond F Aarre

Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen 2017 Sep 18;137(17). Epub 2017 Sep 18.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4045/tidsskr.17.0508DOI Listing
September 2017

Satisfaction with primary care and mental health care among individuals with severe mental illness in a rural area: a seven-year follow-up study of a clinical cohort.

Int J Ment Health Syst 2016 12;10:33. Epub 2016 Apr 12.

Nordfjord Psychiatric Center, Nordfjordeid, Norway.

Background: Most studies of services for people with severe mental illness have been performed in cities. Our 7-year follow-up study aimed to investigate clinical course and satisfaction with services among individuals with severe mental illness who received community mental health services in a rural area. The services were provided by primary care and a community mental health center (CMHC), which worked in close collaboration and emphasized individually tailored case management, relationship-building and continuity of care.

Methods: All 57 patients with severe mental illness who were seen by the CMHC in 1992-1993 and were still alive in 1999 were asked to participate. Retrospective ratings were performed for the first month of contact in 1992-1993 based on patient records and detailed notes. A semi-structured interview was conducted in 1999-2000 with the 40 patients (70.2 %) who gave written consent to participate in the study. DSM-IV diagnoses were made using OPCRIT. The retrospective baseline ratings and the follow-up interview included assessments of symptoms and functioning using the following instruments: the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale Expanded version 4 (BPRS-E), the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS), the Global Assessment of Functioning Scale (split version), and the Practical and Social Functioning Scale (PSF).

Results: The ratings revealed improvements in psychiatric problems and functioning. Patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders improved primarily in psychotic symptoms, while patients with severe affective disorders improved primarily in affective symptoms. Large variations in the use of primary care and mental health services were observed, with more intensive specialized mental health services for individuals with schizophrenia spectrum disorders than severe affective disorders. Overall, the patients were satisfied with the provided services. They were most satisfied with GPs and more satisfied with local outpatient and inpatient services than with hospital inpatient services and medication.

Conclusions: Patients with severe mental illness in a rural area value local services that emphasize relationships and close collaborations among the CMHC, GPs and primary health and social care. Even in an area with a fairly well-staffed CMHC, the highest patient satisfaction was reported for GPs, indicating the potential key role of GPs for this patient group.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13033-016-0064-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4828811PMC
April 2016

Why do clinicians maintain antidepressants in some patients with acute mania? Hints from the European Mania in Bipolar Longitudinal Evaluation of Medication (EMBLEM), a large naturalistic study.

J Clin Psychiatry 2010 Aug 23;71(8):1000-6. Epub 2010 Mar 23.

Bipolar Disorders Program, Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, CIBERSAM, Barcelona, Spain.

Objective: Antidepressants are supposed to be withdrawn during a manic episode. The aim of this study was to analyze the characteristics of manic patients who received antidepressants during a manic phase in a large, naturalistic study.

Method: The European Mania in Bipolar Longitudinal Evaluation of Medication was a 2-year prospective observational study of inpatients and outpatients with acute mania/mixed mania (DSM-IV or ICD-10 criteria) conducted in 14 European countries. Of 2,416 manic patients who continued into the maintenance phase of the study, 345 (14%) were taking an antidepressant and 2,071 (86%) were not taking an antidepressant at baseline, week 1, and/or week 2 postbaseline. Demographic and clinical variables were collected at baseline and each study visit up to 24 months. Outcome measures included the Clinical Global Impressions-Bipolar Disorder scale (CGI-BP overall, mania, and depression scores) at 12 weeks and 24 months, the 5-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-5), and the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) at 12 weeks only. The present study was conducted from December 2002 to June 2004.

Results: More antidepressant maintenance use was seen in patients with mixed episodes (P < .001), rapid cyclers (P < .02), patients with more previous depressive episodes (P < .001), and patients with higher mean HDRS-5 score at baseline (P < .001)-specifically patients with anxiety (P = .013). Patients in the antidepressant group had significantly higher CGI-BP depression scores (P < .001) and a significantly higher rate of depression relapse (P < .001) at both 12 weeks and 24 months.

Conclusions: Patients with mania receiving antidepressants are more likely to be outpatients with mixed episodes, anxiety, or rapid cycling and have a higher risk of depression relapse during follow-up.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4088/JCP.09m05026greDOI Listing
August 2010

Mania in the Nordic countries: patients and treatment in the acute phase of the EMBLEM study.

Nord J Psychiatry 2009 ;63(4):285-91

Gentofte Psychiatric Centre, Niels Andersensvej 65, Hellerup DK-2900, Denmark.

In bipolar disorder, mood stabilizers and second-generation antipsychotics have a central role in pharmacotherapy. There are, however, substantial differences in how the treatment is realized in different countries. The aim of this paper was to compare the treatment of acute mania in the Nordic countries with other European countries during the first 12 weeks of the EMBLEM (European Mania in Bipolar Longitudinal Evaluation of Medication) study. Adult patients with bipolar disorder were enrolled within standard course of care as in/outpatients if they initiated/changed oral medication with antipsychotics, anticonvulsants or lithium for treatment of acute mania. Five hundred and thirty European psychiatrists including 23 Nordic psychiatrists enrolled 3459 patients including 79 Nordic patients eligible for analysis using the same study methods assessing demographics, psychiatric history, clinical status, functional status and pharmacological treatment. Psychiatric status at inclusion measured by the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) and the Clinical Global Impression-Bipolar Disorder (CGI-BP) were similar in the Nordic and European patient groups, which is surprising as 73% of the Nordic patients compared with 38% of the European patients were inpatients. In the Nordic group of patients, more patients were living independently. Before inclusion in the study more patients in the Nordic group had combination therapy, but after inclusion in the study the prescription pattern of psychopharmacy was similar in the Nordic and the European patient groups. This study indicated differences in admission patterns, patient social functioning and medical treatment in the Nordic patients compared with the European patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08039480802663890DOI Listing
November 2009

Phenelzine efficacy in refractory social anxiety disorder: a case series.

Authors:
Trond F Aarre

Nord J Psychiatry 2003 ;57(4):313-5

Nordfjord Psychiatric Clinic, Nordfjordeid, Norway.

Several effective treatments for social phobia are now available, notably cognitive behavioural therapy and some antidepressant medications. Controlled trials indicate that 25-45% of patients fail to respond to the initial treatment. To my knowledge, nothing has yet been published on the treatment of refractory cases. Phenelzine is effective in social phobia, and no treatment has been shown to be superior to phenelzine. Hence, phenelzine is a reasonable option for patients unresponsive to other treatments. This report presents the results of naturalistic, open-label phenelzine treatment of a series of seven consecutive, previously unresponsive patients treated with a mean dose of phenelzine 66 mg. Six patients were classified as responders according to Clinical Global Impression (CGI) ratings. Some experienced dramatic improvement and regained ability to function in school or work. Two patients experienced re-emergence of social phobia while on maintenance therapy. The majority of patients had a sustained response and elected to stay on the medication. There were no serious adverse events. Two patients discontinued due to side-effects. The drawbacks of phenelzine therapy may be more than outweighed by its potential utility in relieving social anxiety disorder. Phenelzine appears to be effective in treating social phobia that has been unresponsive to other treatments. No patient should be considered treatment resistant without being offered a trial of phenelzine.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08039480310002110DOI Listing
January 2004

Efficacy of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in depression: a review of the evidence.

Nord J Psychiatry 2003 ;57(3):227-32

Nordfjord Psychiatric Centre, N-6770 Nordfjordeid, Norway.

Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a novel treatment in psychiatry. We reviewed all published evidence on the efficacy of this treatment option in depressive disorders. An extensive electronic and manual search for eligible research reports identified only 12 studies that met the predetermined criteria for inclusion. rTMS was administered differently in most studies, and patient characteristics varied widely. A formal meta-analysis of the studies was thus not possible. Instead, we conducted a qualitative evaluation of the included studies. The antidepressive efficacy was not consistent, and where efficacy was demonstrated, it was modest in most studies. Some patients had good but transient responses to rTMS. Treatment gains were not maintained beyond the treatment period. Comparisons with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) indicated the superiority of ECT. More, larger and more carefully designed studies are needed to demonstrate convincingly a clinically relevant effect of rTMS. We conclude that there is insufficient evidence for rTMS as a valid treatment for depression at present.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08039480310001409DOI Listing
January 2004
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