Publications by authors named "Torbjoern Aarsland"

4 Publications

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Vitamin d predicts all-cause and cardiac mortality in females with suspected acute coronary syndrome: a comparison with brain natriuretic Peptide and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein.

Cardiol Res Pract 2013 17;2013:398034. Epub 2013 Nov 17.

Department of Cardiology, Stavanger University Hospital, 4068 Stavanger, Norway ; Cardiology Research Institute, Catholic University of Salta, A4400ANG Salta, Argentina.

Vitamin D may not only reflect disease but may also serve as a prognostic indicator. Our aim was to assess the gender-specific utility of vitamin D measured as 25-hydroxy-vitamin D [25(OH)D] to predict all-cause and cardiac death in patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and to compare its prognostic utility to brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). Blood samples were harvested on admission in 982 patients. Forty percent were women (65.9 ± 12.6 years). Mortality was evaluated in quartiles of 25(OH)D, BNP, and hsCRP, respectively, during a 5-year follow-up, applying univariate and multivariate analyses. One hundred and seventy-three patients died; 78 were women. In 92 patients (37 women), death was defined as cardiac. In women, the univariate hazard ratio (HR) for total death of 25(OH)D in Quartile (Q) 2 versus Q1, Q3 versus Q1, and Q4 versus Q1 was 0.55 (95% CI 0.33-0.93), 0.29 (95% CI 0.15-0.55), and 0.13 (95% CI 0.06-0.32), respectively. In females, it was an independent predictor of total and cardiac death, whereas BNP and hsCRP were less gender-specific. No gender differences in 25(OH)D were noted in a reference material. Accordingly, vitamin D independently predicts mortality in females with suspected ACS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/398034DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3855936PMC
December 2013

Socioeconomic assessment and impact of social security on outcome in patients admitted with suspected coronary chest pain in the city of salta, Argentina.

Cardiol Res Pract 2013 29;2013:807249. Epub 2013 May 29.

Department of Cardiology, Stavanger University Hospital, Postboks 8100, 4068 Stavanger, Norway ; Institute of Medicine, University of Bergen, Postboks 7804, 5020 Bergen, Norway ; Cardiology Research Institute, Catholic University of Salta, España 311, A4400ANG Salta, Argentina.

Low socioeconomic status is associated with increased mortality from coronary heart disease. We assessed total mortality, cardiac death, and sudden cardiac death (SCD) in relation to socioeconomic class and social security in 982 patients consecutively admitted with suspected coronary chest pain, living in the city of Salta, northern Argentina. Patients were divided into three socioeconomic classes based on monthly income, residential area, and insurance coverage. Five-year follow-up data were analyzed accordingly, applying univariate and multivariate analyses. At follow-up, 173 patients (17.6%) had died. In 92 patients (9.4%) death was defined as cardiac, of whom 59 patients (6.0%) were characterized as SCD. In the multivariate analysis, the hazard ratios (HRs) for all-cause and cardiac mortality in the highest as compared to the lowest socioeconomic class were 0.42 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.22-0.80), P = 0.008, and 0.39 (95% CI, 0.15-0.99), P = 0.047, respectively. Comparing patients in the upper socioeconomic class to patients without healthcare coverage, HRs were 0.46 (95% CI, 0.23-0.94), P = 0.032, and 0.37 (95% CI, 0.14-1.01), P = 0.054, respectively. In conclusion, survival was mainly tied to socioeconomic inequalities in this population, and the impact of a social security program needs further attention.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/807249DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3681265PMC
July 2013

Serum 25(OH)D is a 2-year predictor of all-cause mortality, cardiac death and sudden cardiac death in chest pain patients from Northern Argentina.

PLoS One 2012 6;7(9):e43228. Epub 2012 Sep 6.

Department of Cardiology, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway.

Background: Several studies have shown an association between vitamin D deficiency and cardiovascular risk. Vitamin D status is assessed by determination of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] in serum.

Methods: We assessed the prognostic utility of 25(OH)D in 982 chest-pain patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome (ACS) from Salta, Northern Argentina. 2-year follow-up data including all-cause mortality, cardiac death and sudden cardiac death were analyzed in quartiles of 25(OH)D, applying univariate and multivariate analysis.

Results: There were statistically significant changes in seasonal 25(OH)D levels. At follow-up, 119 patients had died. The mean 25(OH)D levels were significantly lower among patients dying than in long-term survivors, both in the total population and in patients with a troponin T (TnT) release (n = 388). When comparing 25(OH)D in the highest quartile to the lowest quartile in a multivariable Cox regression model for all-cause mortality, the hazard ratio (HR) for cardiac death and sudden cardiac death in the total population was 0.37 (95% CI, 0.19-0.73), p = 0.004, 0.23 (95% CI, 0.08-0.67), p = 0.007, and 0.32 (95% CI, 0.11-0.94), p = 0.038, respectively. In patients with TnT release, the respective HR was 0.24 (95% CI, 0.10-0.54), p = 0.001, 0.18 (95% CI, 0.05-0.60), p = 0.006 and 0.25 (95% CI, 0.07-0.89), p = 0.033. 25(OH)D had no prognostic value in patients with no TnT release.

Conclusion: Vitamin D was shown to be a useful biomarker for prediction of mortality when obtained at admission in chest pain patients with suspected ACS.

Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01377402.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0043228PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3435385PMC
May 2013

B-type natriuretic peptide and high sensitive C-reactive protein predict 2-year all cause mortality in chest pain patients: a prospective observational study from Salta, Argentina.

BMC Cardiovasc Disord 2011 Sep 29;11:57. Epub 2011 Sep 29.

Department of Cardiology, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway.

Background: Several mechanisms are involved in the pathophysiology of the Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS). We have addressed whether B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) in admission samples may improve risk stratification in chest pain patients with suspected ACS.

Methods: We included 982 patients consecutively admitted with chest pain and suspected ACS at nine hospitals in Salta, Northern Argentina. Total and cardiac mortality were recorded during a 2-year follow up period. Patients were divided into quartiles according to BNP and hsCRP levels, respectively, and inter quartile differences in mortality were statistically evaluated applying univariate and multivariate analyses.

Results: 119 patients died, and the BNP and hsCRP levels were significantly higher among these patients than in survivors. In a multivariable Cox regression model for total death and cardiac death in all patients, the hazard ratio (HR) in the highest quartile (Q4) as compared to the lowest quartile (Q1) of BNP was 2.32 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.24-4.35), p = 0.009 and 3.34 (95% CI, 1.26-8.85), p = 0.015, respectively. In the TnT positive patients (TnT > 0.01 ng/mL), the HR for total death and cardiac death in Q4 as compared to Q1 was 2.12 (95% CI, 1.07-4.18), p = 0.031 and 3.42 (95% CI, 1.13-10.32), p = 0.029, respectively.The HR for total death for hsCRP in Q4 as compared to Q1 was 1.97 (95% CI, 1.17-3.32), p = 0.011, but this biomarker did not predict cardiac death (p = 0.21). No prognostic impact of these two biomarkers was found in the TnT negative patients.

Conclusion: BNP and hsCRP may act as clinically useful biomarkers when obtained at admission in a population with suspected ACS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2261-11-57DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3199275PMC
September 2011
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