Publications by authors named "Tatjana Zabelina"

61 Publications

Risk factors for outcome after allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with advanced phase CML.

Bone Marrow Transplant 2021 Jul 30. Epub 2021 Jul 30.

University Medical Center Hamburg Eppendorf, Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, Hamburg, Germany.

Allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) remains the only curative option for patients with advanced chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, outcome is dismal and of short follow-up. The objective of the study was to determine long-term outcome and risk factors in patients with a history of CML Blast Crisis (BC; n = 96) or accelerated phase (n = 51) transplanted between 1990 and 2018. At transplant, patients had a median age of 39 (range 7-76) years and were in ≥CP2 (n = 70), in AP (n = 40) or in BC (n = 37) with a diagnosis-HSCT interval of median 1.9 (range 0.3-24.4) years. Overall survival (OS) amounted 34% (95% CI 22-46) and progression-free survival (PFS) 26% (95% CI 16-36) at 15 years. Adverse risk factors for OS and PFS were low CD34 count in the graft, donor age (>36 years) and BC. Cumulative incidence of Non-Relapse Mortality (NRM) was 28% (95% CI 18-38) and of relapse (RI) 43% (95% CI 33-53) at 15 years. PB-HSCT and HSCT after 2008 were favorable prognostic factors for NRM, while family donor and patient age >39 years were independently associated with higher RI. HSCT resulted in long-term OS in patients with advanced CML. OS was improved in non-BC patients, with donors ≤36 years and with higher CD34 dose in the graft.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41409-021-01410-xDOI Listing
July 2021

Axicabtagene ciloleucel in vivo expansion and treatment outcome in aggressive B-cell lymphoma in a real-world setting.

Blood Adv 2021 06;5(11):2523-2527

Department of Stem Cell Transplantation.

Data on the association between chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T-cell kinetics and patient outcome in the nontrial setting are missing, mainly due to the lack of broadly available CAR-T-cell diagnostic quantification tools. We performed prospective quantification of axicabtagene ciloleucel (axi-cel) in 21 patients treated for aggressive B-cell lymphoma at our clinic. Median peak CAR-T-cell count was 16.14 CAR-T cells/µL. Patients with 16.14/μL or higher peak CAR-T cells (strong expanders) had more day-30 objective responses (91% vs 40%, P = .02). In univariate analysis, peak CAR-T cell ≥ 16.14 (P < .001), normal platelet counts at start of lymphodepletion (P < .001), no prior stem cell transplant (P = .04), and peak CAR-T cells as continuous variable (P = .03) were associated with better progression-free survival (PFS). After adjusting for platelet counts and prior stem cell transplantation, peak CAR-T cells below median was still associated with shorter PFS (relative risk, 0.15, 95% confidence interval, 0.04-0.59, P = .007). Low platelet counts also maintained significant impact on PFS. Our data demonstrate association of axi-cel levels and outcome in a nontrial setting and for the first time use a cutoff to segregate weak and strong expanders with respective outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/bloodadvances.2020003959DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8238487PMC
June 2021

Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Patients with Lower-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2020 11 24;26(11):2047-2052. Epub 2020 Jul 24.

Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. Electronic address:

The indication for allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) in patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is controversial. Here we report 60 patients with a low risk (n = 32) or intermediate risk (n = 28) classification according to the revised International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS-R) who underwent allogeneic SCT with a reduced-intensity conditioning (n = 45) or myeloablative conditioning (n = 15) regimen from an HLA-identical sibling (n = 9), a matched unrelated donor (n = 36), or a mismatched unrelated donor (n = 15). The rates of grade II-IV and grade III-IV acute graft-versus-host disease were 32% and 7%, respectively, resulting in a transplantation-related mortality (TRM) of 17% at 3 years. The cumulative incidence of relapse at 5 years was only 7%, resulting in a 5-year disease-free survival of 72% and overall survival (OS) of 79%. Transplantation from a fully matched donor resulted in significantly improved OS at 5 years (91% versus 70%). Allogeneic SCT in lower-risk MDS (IPSS-R low or intermediate risk) from an HLA-matched donor resulted in excellent OS with a low risk of relapse.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2020.07.018DOI Listing
November 2020

Glucagon-like peptide 2 for intestinal stem cell and Paneth cell repair during graft-versus-host disease in mice and humans.

Blood 2020 09;136(12):1442-1455

Department of Medicine I, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Center University of Freiburg (MCUF).

Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a life-threatening complication after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT). Although currently used GVHD treatment regimens target the donor immune system, we explored here an approach that aims at protecting and regenerating Paneth cells (PCs) and intestinal stem cells (ISCs). Glucagon-like-peptide-2 (GLP-2) is an enteroendocrine tissue hormone produced by intestinal L cells. We observed that acute GVHD reduced intestinal GLP-2 levels in mice and patients developing GVHD. Treatment with the GLP-2 agonist, teduglutide, reduced de novo acute GVHD and steroid-refractory GVHD, without compromising graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effects in multiple mouse models. Mechanistically GLP-2 substitution promoted regeneration of PCs and ISCs, which enhanced production of antimicrobial peptides and caused microbiome changes. GLP-2 expanded intestinal organoids and reduced expression of apoptosis-related genes. Low numbers of L cells in intestinal biopsies and high serum levels of GLP-2 were associated with a higher incidence of nonrelapse mortality in patients undergoing allo-HCT. Our findings indicate that L cells are a target of GVHD and that GLP-2-based treatment of acute GVHD restores intestinal homeostasis via an increase of ISCs and PCs without impairing GVL effects. Teduglutide could become a novel combination partner for immunosuppressive GVHD therapy to be tested in clinical trials.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood.2020005957DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7498363PMC
September 2020

Predicted Indirectly ReCognizable HLA Epitopes (PIRCHE) Are Associated with Poorer Outcome after Single Mismatch Unrelated Donor Stem Cell Transplantation: A Study of the Cooperative Transplant Study Group (KTS) of the German Group for Bone Marrow and Stem Cell Transplantation (DAG-KBT).

Transfus Med Hemother 2019 Oct 29;46(5):370-375. Epub 2019 Aug 29.

Hematology and Oncology, Medical Center, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.

There is no established standard for selection of mismatched unrelated donors. Indirect recognition of HLA mismatches can be predicted using the model of "Predicted Indirectly ReCognizable HLA Epitopes" (PIRCHE). We performed a multicenter retrospective study evaluating the impact PIRCHE on outcome after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) from single mismatched (HLA 9/10 matched) unrelated donors. The study cohort included 424 adult recipients of HLA 9/10 matched unrelated donor transplants (9/10 MUD), treated for AML or MDS at 6 transplant centers across Germany. Detection of PIRCHE was associated with lower overall survival (OS) (47 vs. 57%, = 0.04), higher non-relapse mortality (NRM) (32 vs. 20%, = 0.05), and higher incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) (49 vs. 31%, = 0.04) at 2 years. Cumulative incidence of acute GVHD grade 2-4 at 6 months was not significantly different (30 vs. 23%, = 0.2). OS for 9/10 MUD with no PIRCHE was similar to 10/10 MUD (57 vs. 55%). In multivariate analysis, PIRCHE retained negative impact on OS (RR 1.5, 95% CI 1.0-2.1, = 0.03) and NRM (RR 1.7, 95% CI 1.0-2.9, = 0.03). To the best of our knowledge, for the first time, we show the association of PIRCHE and survival outcome after allo-HSCT. The PIRCHE model, if validated in an independent cohort, may allow selection of permissible HLA mismatches that enable improved transplant outcome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000502389DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6876613PMC
October 2019

Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for myelofibrosis patients aged ≥65 years.

Eur J Haematol 2019 Oct 5;103(4):370-378. Epub 2019 Aug 5.

Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.

Introduction: Myelofibrosis (MF) is a disease of elderly with median age of 65 years at diagnosis. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (ASCT) currently is the only potentially curative option, although associated with treatment-related morbidity and mortality. Development of reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens enabled transplant to be performed successfully in older patients.

Objectives And Methods: To evaluate outcome of transplantation among elderly patients (≥65 years), we conducted retrospective analysis of results in 45 patients transplanted between 2002 and 2018 at the University Medical Center Hamburg. Median age at ASCT was 67 years (r: 65-74). The majority of patients (n = 43) received busulfan plus fludarabine RIC regimen and were classified as DIPSS intermediate-2 or high risk at time of transplantation.

Results: After a median follow-up of 4 years, 6-year estimated progression-free survival and overall survival were 60% and 64%, respectively. Cumulative incidence of non-relapse mortality was 21% at 1 year. Cumulative incidence of relapse at 6 years was 10%. Patients with Sorror score 3 or less had a significant better survival (73% vs 25%, P = .009).

Conclusion: Reduced intensity conditioning regimen followed by ASCT in older patients with myelofibrosis is a curative treatment option. Outcome is more favorable in patients with no or minimal comorbidities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ejh.13294DOI Listing
October 2019

Reduced intensity allogeneic stem cell transplantation for younger patients with myelofibrosis.

Br J Haematol 2019 08 15;186(3):484-489. Epub 2019 May 15.

Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.

Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) is a curative procedure for myelofibrosis. Elderly people are mainly affected, limiting the feasibility of myeloablative regimens. The introduction of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) made alloSCT feasible for older patients. Nevertheless, the incidence of myelofibrosis is not negligible in young patients, who are theoretically able to tolerate high-intensity therapy. Very few data are available about the efficacy of RIC-alloSCT in younger myelofibrosis patients. This study included 56 transplanted patients aged <55 years. Only 30% had a human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-matched sibling donor, the others were transplanted from a fully-matched (36%) or partially-matched (34%) unrelated donor. All transplants were conditioned according the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation protocol: busulfan-fludarabine + anti-thymocyte globulin, followed by ciclosporin and mycophenolate. One patient experienced primary graft failure. Incidence of graft-versus-host disease grade II-IV was 44% (grade III/IV 23%). One-year non-relapse mortality was 7% and the 5-year cumulative incidence of relapse was 19%. After a median follow-up of 8·6 years, the estimated 5-year progression-free survival and overall survival (OS) was 68% and 82%, respectively. Patients with fully-matched donor had a 5-year OS of 92%, in contrast to 68% for those with a mismatched donor (P = 0·03). The most important outcome-determining factor is donor HLA-matching. In conclusion, RIC-alloSCT ensures optimal engraftment and low relapse rate in younger myelofibrosis patients, enabling the possibility of cure in this group.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjh.15952DOI Listing
August 2019

Relative Impact of HLA Matching and Non-HLA Donor Characteristics on Outcomes of Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2018 12 24;24(12):2558-2567. Epub 2018 Jul 24.

Department of Hematology and Oncology, Eberhard Karls University Tubingen, Tubingen, Germany.

Increasing donor-recipient HLA disparity is associated with negative outcomes of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), but its comparative relevance amid non-HLA donor characteristics is not well established. We addressed this question in 3215 HSCTs performed between 2005 and 2013 in Germany for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Donors were HLA-matched related (MRD; n = 872) or unrelated (10/10 MUD, n = 1553) or HLA-mismatched unrelated (<10/10 MMUD, n = 790). Overall survival (OS) was similar after MRD compared with 10/10 MUD HSCT, reflecting opposing hazards of relapse (hazard ratio [HR], 1.32; P < .002) and nonrelapse mortality (HR, .63; P < .001). After UD HSCT, increasing HLA disparity was associated with inferior OS (HR, 1.21 [P < .02] and HR, 1.57 [P < .001] for 9/10 and ≤8/10 MMUD, respectively, compared with 10/10 MUD). Among non-HLA donor characteristics, age, sex mismatching (male recipient-female donor), and cytomegalovirus (CMV) mismatching (positive recipient-negative donor) impacted OS. Multivariate subgroup analysis showed that OS was similar after HSCT from the youngest 9/10 MMUD (<30 years) compared with the oldest 10/10 MUD (>40 years) (HR, 1.18; P = .25) and also in male patients transplanted from female 10/10 MUD compared with male 9/10 MMUD (HR, .89; P = .46). In contrast, OS of CMV-positive patients tended to be better with CMV-negative 10/10 MUDs compared with CMV-positive 9/10 MMUDs (HR, 1.31; P = .04). Because of low patient numbers in subgroups, definite conclusions and establishment of a hierarchy among HLA matching and non-HLA donor characteristics could not be made. Our data suggest that the impact of donor age and sex mismatch but not CMV mismatch on outcome of allogeneic HSCT may be comparable with that of single HLA disparity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2018.06.026DOI Listing
December 2018

Peritransplantation Ruxolitinib Prevents Acute Graft-versus-Host Disease in Patients with Myelofibrosis Undergoing Allogenic Stem Cell Transplantation.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2018 10 22;24(10):2152-2156. Epub 2018 May 22.

Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.

JAK inhibition by ruxolitinib is approved for treating myelofibrosis and also has shown efficacy in treating steroid-resistant acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). In 12 patients with myelofibrosis (median age, 63 years; range, 43 to 71 years) who were treated with ruxolitinib and underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation (ASCT), ruxolitinib was continued (2 × 5 mg daily) until stable engraftment. No graft failure was observed, and leukocyte engraftment was achieved after a median of 12 days (range, 11 to 18 days). One patient developed fever of unknown origin after discontinuation of ruxolitinib; otherwise, no withdrawal syndrome was observed. Overall, only 1 patient each experienced acute GVHD grade I or II, resulting in an 8% incidence of acute GVHD grade II-IV at day +100, with no nonrelapse mortality. Complete chimerism was achieved in 11 patients after a median of 40 days, and molecular clearance of the underlying driver mutation was noted in 10 patients after a median of 32 days. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation occurred in 5 patients (41%), 1 of whom had CMV colitis as well, but all resolved after ganciclovir treatment. In 2 patients, ruxolitinib had to be discontinued on day 17 and day 18 after ASCT due to cytopenia after engraftment. Levels of inflammatory cytokines IL-8, IL-10, IL-6, TNFR2, INF-α, and INF-β were reduced after ruxolitinib treatment. After day +100, 4 patients developed acute GVHD (1 with grade I, 2 with grade II, and 1 with grade III) after tapering of cyclosporine, and all patients were alive at a median follow-up of 17 months (range, 12 to 18 months).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2018.05.023DOI Listing
October 2018

Impact of Molecular Genetics on Outcome in Myelofibrosis Patients after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2017 Jul 4;23(7):1095-1101. Epub 2017 Apr 4.

Department of Hematology, Hemostasis, Oncology and Stem Cell Transplantation, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.

Molecular genetics may influence outcome for patients with myelofibrosis. To determine the impact of molecular genetics on outcome after allogeneic stem cell transplantation, we screened 169 patients with primary myelofibrosis (n = 110), post-essential thrombocythemia/polycythemia vera myelofibrosis (n = 46), and myelofibrosis in transformation (n = 13) for mutations in 16 frequently mutated genes. The most frequent mutation was JAK2V617F (n = 101), followed by ASXL1 (n = 49), calreticulin (n = 34), SRSF2 (n = 16), TET2 (n = 10), U2AF1 (n = 11), EZH2 (n = 7), MPL (n = 6), IDH2 (n = 5), IDH1 (n = 4), and CBL (n = 1). The cumulative incidence of nonrelapse mortality (NRM) at 1 year was 21% and of relapse at 5 years 25%. The 5-year rates progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were and 56%, respectively. In a multivariate analysis CALR mutation was an independent factor for lower NRM (HR, .415; P = .05), improved PFS (HR, .393; P = .01), and OS (HR, .448; P = .03). ASXL1 and IDH2 mutations were independent risk factors for lower PFS (HR, 1.53 [P = .008], and HR, 5.451 [P = .002], respectively), whereas no impact was observed for "triple negative" patients. Molecular genetics, especially CALR, IDH2, and ASXL1 mutations, may thus be useful to predict outcome independently from known clinical risk factors after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for myelofibrosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2017.03.034DOI Listing
July 2017

Outcome after Transplantation According to Reduced-Intensity Conditioning Regimen in Patients Undergoing Transplantation for Myelofibrosis.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2016 07 10;22(7):1206-1211. Epub 2016 Mar 10.

Biologie Cellulaire, Saint-Louis Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France.

Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the sole curative option for myelofibrosis. Many transplantation recipients receive a reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimen owing to age or comorbidities; however, there is little published evidence to guide the choice of RIC regimen. In this study, we compared outcomes in patients who received 1 of 2 frequently used RIC regimens for patients with myelofibrosis: fludarabine-busulfan (FB) and fludarabine-melphalan (FM). A total of 160 patients underwent a RIC allograft procedure (FB group, n = 105; FM group, n = 55). We have developed a complex statistical model involving weighting and adjustment to permit comparison between these 2 groups. After weighting, the incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was 62% in the FM group and 31% in the FB group (P = .001), and the corresponding incidence of chronic GVHD was 49% and 53%, respectively. The 7-year progression-free survival was were 52% in the FM group versus 33% in the FB group, and the 7-year overall survival rate 52% in the FM group versus 59% in the FB group. Nonrelapse mortality (NRM) was 43% in the FM group and 31% in the FB group. Multivariable analyses revealed no significant differences in PFS between the 2 groups; however, the relapse rate was significantly lower in the FM group (hazard ratio, 9.21; P = .008), whereas a trend toward reduced NRM was seen in the FB group (hazard ratio, 0.51; P = .068). In conclusion, both regimens appear to be efficient in mediating disease control and can be used to successfully condition patients with myelofibrosis. The FM regimen appears to induce more NRM than the FB regimen, but with augmented control of disease, leading to comparable overall survival rates for both regimens.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2016.02.019DOI Listing
July 2016

Correlation of somatic mutations with outcome after FLAMSA-busulfan sequential conditioning and allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes.

Eur J Haematol 2016 Sep 15;97(3):288-96. Epub 2016 Feb 15.

Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.

Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is a curative treatment option for myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Little is known about the prognostic impact of mutations, for example, in TP53 specifically after allo-HSCT. We here describe the prognostic impact of mutations in a panel of 19 genes analyzed by amplicon-based next-generation-sequencing in a uniformly treated patient cohort. Sixty-two patients with a median age of 61 yr suffered from MDS with 0-20% bone marrow blasts. International Prognostic Score was intermediate 1 (15%) and higher (79%). Conditioning uniformly was performed using a sequential approach in which FLAMSA chemotherapy was followed by Busulfan-based conditioning. Patients mostly were transplanted from an unrelated donor (77%), and 36% of patients received a graft from a mismatched donor. Median number of mutations was 2 (range 0-6). RUNX1, GATA2, TET2, and CEBPA were the genes most frequently found mutated. TP53, a factor previously reported to confer adverse prognostic impact after allogeneic stem cell transplantation, was mutated in samples from eight patients, one of which showed a silent mutation. With an estimated 5-yr overall/disease-free survival of 48 ± 7%/41 ± 7%, none of the mutations analyzed showed a prognostic impact in this analysis of the largest uniformly treated cohort thus far. This especially holds true for patients with a mutation in TP53.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ejh.12724DOI Listing
September 2016

Prognostic factors for survival of patients with newly diagnosed chronic GVHD according to NIH criteria.

Ann Hematol 2015 Oct 24;94(10):1727-32. Epub 2015 Jul 24.

Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Center Hamburg, Martinistr. 52, 20246, Hamburg, Germany,

Chronic graft versus host disease (cGvHD) is the most common cause of late morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We retrospectively evaluated the impact of NIH classification on outcome of patients at our center. Primary endpoint was overall survival at 5 years. Two hundred one patients with cGVHD according to NIH were included. Platelets <100,000/μl on day of diagnosis of cGvHD (HR 2.97, 95 % CI 1.7-5.3, p < 0.001), female donor (HR 1.78, 95 % CI 1.0-3.2, p = 0.05), and reduced intensity conditioning (HR 1.95, 95 % CI 1.0-3.8, p = 0.05) impacted overall survival. Non-relapse mortality (NRM) was higher for patients with low vs. high platelets: 26 % (95 % CI 14-40) vs. 6 % (95 % CI 2-10), p < 0.001, and tended to be higher for female vs. male donor: 14 % (95 % CI 7-23) vs. 7 % (95 % CI 3-13), p = 0.08. Relapse tended to be higher for recipients of reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) vs. myeloablative conditioning (MAC): 33 % (95 % CI 23-43) vs. 20 % (95 % CI 10-31), p = 0.06. After excluding patients with myeloma and lymphoma, IgG serum levels at diagnosis of cGvHD of 122 patients were correlated with survival. IgG levels above normal were associated with worse 2-year overall survival (OS), p = 0.04, compared to normal or low IgG levels. Platelet count at diagnosis remains the most valid prognostic factor for survival of patients with cGvHD even in the era of NIH grading. High IgG level at diagnosis of cGVHD represents a potential negative prognostic parameter that deserves further investigation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00277-015-2452-6DOI Listing
October 2015

Atovaquone for Prophylaxis of Toxoplasmosis after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

Acta Haematol 2015 5;134(3):146-54. Epub 2015 May 5.

Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.

Toxoplasmosis and infections by other opportunistic agents such as Pneumocystis jirovecii constitute life-threatening risks for patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) has been well established for post-transplant toxoplasmosis and pneumocystis prophylaxis, but treatment may be limited due to toxicity. We explored atovaquone as an alternative and compared it with TMP-SMX regarding toxicity and efficacy during the first 100 days after transplantation in 155 consecutive adult stem cell recipients. Eight patients with a prior history of TMP-SMX intolerance received atovaquone as first-line prophylaxis. TMP-SMX was used for 141 patients as first-line strategy, but 13 patients (9.2%) were later switched to atovaquone due to TMP-SMX toxicity or gastrointestinal symptoms. No active toxoplasmosis or active P. jirovecii infection developed under continued prophylaxis with either TMP-SMX or atovaquone. However, for reasons of TMP-SMX and/or atovaquone toxicity, 7 patients were unable to tolerate any efficacious toxoplasmosis prophylaxis and therefore obtained inhalative pentamidine as P. jirovecii prophylaxis but no toxoplasmosis prophylaxis. Importantly, 2 of these patients developed severe toxoplasmosis. In summary, atovaquone appears as a valid alternative for at least some post-transplant patients who cannot tolerate TMP-SMX. This should be further confirmed by multicenter trials.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000380757DOI Listing
December 2015

Impact of allogeneic stem cell transplantation on survival of patients less than 65 years of age with primary myelofibrosis.

Blood 2015 May 17;125(21):3347-50; quiz 3364. Epub 2015 Mar 17.

Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology, University Hospital, Ospedale di Circolo, Varese, Italy.

Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT) is the only curative option for patients with primary myelofibrosis (PMF), but information on its net advantage over conventional therapies is lacking. Using ad hoc statistical analysis, we determined outcomes in 438 patients <65 years old at diagnosis who received allogenic SCT (n = 190) or conventional therapies (n = 248). Among patients at low risk per the Dynamic International Prognostic Scoring System (DIPSS) model, the relative risk of death after allogenic SCT vs those treated with nontransplant modalities was 5.6 (95% CI, 1.7-19; P = .0051); for intermediate-1 risk it was 1.6 (95% CI, 0.79-3.2; P = .19), for intermediate-2 risk, 0.55 (95% CI, 0.36-0.83; P = .005), and for high risk, 0.37 (95% CI, 0.21-0.66; P = .0007). Thus, patients with intermediate-2 or high-risk PMF clearly benefit from allogenic SCT. Patients at low risk should receive nontransplant therapy, whereas individual counseling is indicated for patients at intermediate-1 risk.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood-2014-10-608315DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4440886PMC
May 2015

Dynamic of bone marrow fibrosis regression predicts survival after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for myelofibrosis.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2014 Jun 1;20(6):812-5. Epub 2014 Mar 1.

Institute of Pathology, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany.

We correlate regression of bone marrow fibrosis (BMF) on day 30 and 100 after dose- reduced allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) in 57 patients with primary or post-essential thrombocythemia/polycythemia vera myelofibrosis with graft function and survival. The distribution of International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) risk score categories was 1 patient with low risk, 5 patients with intermediate-1 risk, 18 patients with intermediate-2 risk, and 33 patients with high risk. Before allo-SCT, 41 patients (72%) were classified as XXX [myclofibrosis (MF)]-3 and 16 (28%) were classified as MF-2 according to the World Health Organization criteria. At postengraftment day +30 (±10 days), 21% of the patients had near-complete or complete regression of BMF (MF-0/-1), and on day +100 (±20 days), 54% were MF-0/-1. The 5-year overall survival rate at day +100 was 96% in patients with MF-0/-1 and 57% for those with MF-2/-3 (P = .04). There was no difference in BMF regression at day +100 between IPSS high-risk and low/intermediate-risk patients. Complete donor cell chimerism at day +100 was seen in 81% of patients with MF-0/-1 and in 31% of those with MF-2/-3. Patients with MF-2/-3 at day +100 were more likely to be transfusion-dependent for either RBCs (P = .014) or platelets (P = .018). Rapid BMF regression after reduced-intensity conditioning allo-SCT resulted in a favorable survival independent of IPSS risk score at transplantation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2014.02.019DOI Listing
June 2014

Serum albumin level predicts survival of patients with gastrointestinal acute graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

Ann Hematol 2014 May 19;93(5):855-61. Epub 2013 Nov 19.

Clinic for stem cell transplantation, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistr. 52, 20245, Hamburg, Germany,

In a retrospective single-centre study, we analysed the prognostic impact of factors identifiable at initial diagnosis of acute GVHD (aGVHD). We retrospectively analysed 495 adult patients of whom 308 (62 %) developed acute GVHD (I-IV) and were included in further analysis. Gut aGVHD was diagnosed in 163/308 cases (53 %). Conditioning was myeloablative conditioning (MAC) in 123 (39.9 %) and reduced intensity (RIC) in 185 (60.1 %) patients. Median serum albumin level at diagnosis of aGVHD was 34 g/l, which was used as cut-off for low vs. normal albumin levels. In patients with gut aGVHD, low albumin level at the time of diagnosis of aGVHD was associated with poorer overall survival (OS) which was 52 vs. 67 % at 1 year and 40 vs. 61 % at 3 years, p = 0.015. In patients with only skin aGVHD, 1- and 3-year OS of patients with low vs. normal albumin levels were 72 vs. 72 % and 59 vs. 57 %, respectively, p = 0.69. In multivariate analysis of patients with gut aGVHD, low serum albumin level ≤34 g/l (relative risk (RR) 2.13, p = 0.003), gut aGVHD grades 3-4 (RR 2.70, p = 0.001), RIC (RR 1.84, p = 0.024), matched unrelated donor (RR 1.86, p = 0.18) and mismatched unrelated donor (RR 2.76, p = 0.03) retained negative impact on OS. Subgroup analysis revealed that impact of albumin was restricted to patients with gut aGVHD after RIC. Low serum albumin levels are associated with poorer OS in patients with gut but not skin aGVHD after RIC but not MAC allogeneic stem cell transplantation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00277-013-1957-0DOI Listing
May 2014

Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for myelofibrosis with leukemic transformation: a study from the Myeloproliferative Neoplasm Subcommittee of the CMWP of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2014 Feb 4;20(2):279-81. Epub 2013 Nov 4.

Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University Hospital Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany. Electronic address:

Transformed acute myeloid leukemia in myelofibrosis results in a median survival of less than 5 months. We identified 46 of 1048 myelofibrosis patients in the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation registry who received allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute leukemia evolving from myelofibrosis. The cumulative incidence of treatment-related mortality at 1 year was 28% (95% confidence interval, 14 to 42) and of relapse at 3 years was 47% (95% confidence interval, 31 to 63). The 3-year progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 26% and 33%, respectively. The only significant factor for survival was complete remission versus no complete remission before transplantation (69% versus 22%, P = .008); however, complete remission was achieved only in 8 patients. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation can cure myelofibrosis patients transformed to leukemia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2013.10.027DOI Listing
February 2014

Postallogeneic monitoring with molecular markers detected by pretransplant next-generation or Sanger sequencing predicts clinical relapse in patients with myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms.

Eur J Haematol 2014 Mar 21;92(3):189-94. Epub 2013 Nov 21.

Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.

Relapse is the major cause of treatment failure after allogeneic stem-cell transplantation (AHSCT) for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome/myeloproliferative syndrome neoplasms (MDS/MPN). We evaluated the impact of molecular mutations on outcome and the value of molecular monitoring post-transplantation. We screened 45 patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (n = 39 patients, including seven with transformed-acute myeloid leukemia), MDS/MPN unclassifiable (n = 5), and atypical BCR-ABL1-negative CML (n = 1) for mutations in ASXL1, CBL, NRAS, and TET2 genes by molecular genetics including a sensitive next-generation sequencing (NGS) technique. In 36 patients, sufficient DNA was available for molecular analyses. In particular, TET2 and CBL mutations were screened applying amplicon deep sequencing. In 89% of cases, at least one mutation could be detected: ASXL1: n = 18 (50%); CBL: n = 7 (19%); TET2: n = 15 (42%); and NRAS: n = 11 (32%). Survival after AHSCT at 5 yr was 46% (95% CI 28-64%) and was not influenced by any mutation. After a median of 6 months after AHSCT in 33% of the patients, one of the molecular markers was still detectable, resulting in a higher incidence of relapse than in patients with undetectable mutations (50% vs. 15%, P = 0.04). In conclusion, pretransplant molecular mutation analysis can help to detect biomarkers in patients with MPN/MDS, which may be subsequently used as minimal residual disease markers after AHSCT.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ejh.12223DOI Listing
March 2014

Outcome of allogeneic SCT in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in the era of tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy.

Ann Hematol 2013 Apr 19;92(4):487-96. Epub 2012 Dec 19.

Department for Stem Cell Transplantation, University Cancer Center Hamburg (UCCH), Martinistr. 52, 20246, Hamburg, Germany.

The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) led to a dramatic change in the role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) with a rapid decline in the number of patients receiving SCT in first chronic phase (CP1). We evaluated 68 consecutive patients in all phases of CML (male/female = 39:29, 27 in CP1), who received SCT from related/unrelated donors (related/unrelated = 23:45) under myeloablative or reduced intensity conditioning (MAC/RIC = 45:23). Forty-eight patients (71 %) received TKIs pre-SCT, 20 patients post-SCT (29 %). Overall survival (OS) of CP1 patients achieved a plateau of 85 % at 10 months. Relapse-free survival (RFS) of CP1 patients was 85 % at 1 and 2 years, and 81 % at 5 years. Multivariate analysis showed adverse OS and RFS for patients transplanted >CP1 (hazard ratio (HR) = 6.61 and 4.62) and those who had grade III-IV aGvHD (HR = 2.45 and 1.82). Patients with advanced CML had estimated OS of 65 and 47 %; and RFS of 41 and 32 % at 1 and 2 years respectively. Therefore, for patients with advanced CML phases, allogeneic SCT provides an acceptable chance of cure. Transplant research should focus on improving conditioning regimens and post-SCT management for this subgroup of CML patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00277-012-1650-8DOI Listing
April 2013

Impact of high-risk cytogenetics and achievement of molecular remission on long-term freedom from disease after autologous-allogeneic tandem transplantation in patients with multiple myeloma.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2013 Mar 16;19(3):398-404. Epub 2012 Oct 16.

Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.

Within a prospective protocol, the incidence and impact of achievement of molecular remission (mCR) and high-risk cytogenetics was investigated in 73 patients with multiple myeloma (MM) after autologous (auto)-allogeneic (allo) tandem stem cell transplantation (SCT). After induction chemotherapy, patients received melphalan 200 mg/m(2) before undergoing auto-SCT, followed 3 months later by melphalan 140 mg/m(2) and fludarabine 180 mg/m(2) before allo-SCT. Sixteen patients had high-risk cytogenetic features, defined by positive FISH for del(17p13) and/or t(4;14). Overall, 66% of the patients achieved CR or near-CR, and 41% achieved mCR, which was sustained negative (at least 4 consecutive samples negative) in 15 patients (21%), with no significant difference in incidence between the patients with high-risk cytogenetics and others (P = .70). After a median follow-up of 6 years, overall 5-year progression-free survival was 29%, with no significant difference between del 17p13/t(4;14)-harboring patients and others (24% versus 30%; P = .70). The 5-year progression-free survival differed substantially according to the achieved remission: 17% for partial remission, 41% for CR, 57% for mCR, and 85% for sustained mCR. These results suggest that auto-allo tandem SCT may overcome the negative prognostic effect of del(17p13) and/or t(4;14) and that achievement of molecular remission resulted in long-term freedom from disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2012.10.008DOI Listing
March 2013

Risk models predicting survival after reduced-intensity transplantation for myelofibrosis.

Br J Haematol 2012 Apr 27;157(1):75-85. Epub 2012 Jan 27.

Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.

To define a prognostic model for predicting outcome of reduced-intensity allogeneic stem cell transplantation (RIC-ASCT) for myelofibrosis we evaluated 150 homogeneously treated patients and developed a new risk score for overall survival (OS). In a multivariate Cox model for OS, only JAK2 V617F wild-type, age ≥57 years and constitutional symptoms were independently predictive for OS (Hazard Ratio: 2·02; 2·43 and 2·80 respectively). Depending on the presence of one, two or all of these factors, HR of death was 3·08; 4·70 and 16·61 respectively (P < 0·001). This score was compared to the Lille, Cervantes, International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS), dynamic IPSS (DIPSS) and modified European Blood and Marrow Transplantation Group (EBMT) scores. Lille score correlated significantly with OS but discriminated poorly between the intermediate and high-risk groups (5-year OS 56% and 51% respectively). IPSS and DIPSS correlated significantly with OS but differences between intermediate-1 and intermediate-2 groups were not significant (5-year OS 78% vs. 78% and 70%, 60% respectively). Modified EBMT and Cervantes models did not predict OS post-ASCT. In conclusion, a simple model which includes: age, JAK2 V617F-status and constitutional symptoms can clearly separate distinct risk groups and can be used in addition to the Lille model to predict OS after RIC-ASCT for myelofibrosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2141.2011.09009.xDOI Listing
April 2012

The Role of Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation in Relapsed/Refractory Hodgkin's Lymphoma Patients.

Adv Hematol 2011 26;2011:974658. Epub 2010 Oct 26.

Interdisciplinary Clinic for Stem Cell Transplantation, University Cancer Center Hamburg (UCCH), Martinistr. 52, 20246 Hamburg, Germany.

Despite the favorable prognosis of most patients with Hodgkin's Lymphoma (HL), 15-20% of patients remain refractory to chemoradiotherapy, and 20-40% experience relapses following autologous stem cell transplantation (SCT) being used as salvage approach in this situation. Long-term survival of only 20% was reported for patients who failed this option. As some authors suggested the presence of a graft versus HL effect, allogeneic SCT was introduced as a further option. Myeloablative strategies were reported to be able to achieve cure in some younger patients, but high nonrelapse mortality remains a problem. Reduced intensity conditioning, in turn, was found to be associated with high posttransplant relapse rates. As there is currently no standard in the management of HL patients who failed autologous SCT, we here review the literature on allogeneic stem cell transplantation in HL patients with a special focus on the outcomes and risk factors being reported in the largest studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/974658DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2964008PMC
July 2011

Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for myelodysplastic syndromes with bone marrow fibrosis.

Haematologica 2011 Feb 22;96(2):291-7. Epub 2010 Oct 22.

Department for Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Center, Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistraße 52 D-20246, Hamburg, Germany.

Background: Bone marrow fibrosis in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome is associated with a poor outcome, but whether the outcome after allogeneic stem cell transplantation is related to the degree of bone marrow fibrosis is unknown.

Design And Methods: Patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and known bone marrow histology (n=721) who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation were classified according to the degree of bone marrow fibrosis into those without fibrosis (n=483), those with mild or moderate fibrosis (n=199) and those with severe fibrosis (n=39) and analyzed regarding engraftment, treatment-related mortality, relapse and survival.

Results: The degree of fibrosis was not associated with disease status or abnormal cytogenetics. The cumulative incidence of engraftment achieved at day +30 in non-fibrotic patients was 93% and was significantly lower in those with mild or moderate fibrosis (89%) and severe fibrosis (75%) (P=0.009). Neutrophil engraftment occurred later in patients with mild or moderate fibrosis and severe fibrosis than in patients without fibrosis (median 17 versus 20 versus 16 days, respectively; P=0.002). The cumulative incidence of relapse at 3 years was significantly higher in patients with severe fibrosis than in those with a lesser degree of fibrosis or no fibrosis (47% versus 28% versus 27%, respectively; P=0.04), resulting in comparable 3-year disease-free survival rates in patients without fibrosis and in those with mild or moderate fibrosis (42% versus 38%, respectively) but a lower disease-free survival rate in those with severe fibrosis (18%; P=0.002). Severe fibrosis remained an independent factor for reduced survival (hazard ratio, 1.9; P=0.006).

Conclusions: Among patients with myelodysplastic syndromes, only severe fibrosis affects survival after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation while patients with mild or moderate fibrosis have an outcome comparable to that of patients without bone marrow fibrosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3324/haematol.2010.031229DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3031698PMC
February 2011

Viral encephalitis after allogeneic stem cell transplantation: a rare complication with distinct characteristics of different causative agents.

Haematologica 2011 Jan 17;96(1):142-9. Epub 2010 Sep 17.

Medizinische Klinik III (Hämatologie, Onkologie and Transfusionsmedizin), Charité Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin, Germany.

Background: Limited data are available on characteristics of viral encephalitis in patients after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

Design And Methods: We analyzed 2,628 patients after allogeneic stem cell transplantation to identify risk factors and characteristics of viral encephalitis.

Results: Viral encephalitis occurred in 32 patients (1.2%, 95% confidence interval 0.8%-1.6%) and was associated with the use of OKT-3 or alemtuzumab for T-cell depletion (P < 0.001) and an increased mortality (P = 0.011) in comparison to patients without viral encephalitis. Detected viruses included human herpesvirus-6 (28%), Epstein-Barr virus (19%), herpes simplex virus (13%), JC virus (9%), varicella zoster virus (6%), cytomegalovirus (6%) and adenovirus (3%). More than one virus was identified in 16% of the patients. The median onset time was 106 days after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for the total group of 32 patients, but onset times were shortest in those with human herpesvirus-6 encephalitis and longest in those with JC virus-associated progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. The probability of a sustained response to treatment was 63% (95% confidence interval 44%-82%) with a median survival of 94 (95% confidence interval 36-152) days after onset, but significant variation was found when considering different causative viruses. Patients with herpes simplex virus encephalitis had the most favorable outcome with no encephalitis-related deaths.

Conclusions: The use of OKT-3 or alemtuzumab for in vivo T-cell depletion is associated with an increased risk of viral encephalitis after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Different viruses are frequently associated with distinct characteristics such as onset time, response to treatment and outcome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3324/haematol.2010.029876DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3012778PMC
January 2011

Chimerism studies with quantitative real-time PCR in stem cell recipients with acute myeloid leukemia.

Exp Hematol 2010 Dec 17;38(12):1261-71. Epub 2010 Sep 17.

Interdisciplinary Clinic for Stem Cell Transplantation, University of Hamburg, Martinistrasse 52, Hamburg, Germany.

Objective: Chimerism is well-established for surveillance of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), but interpretation of the results and techniques is not standardized.

Materials And Methods: We correlated chimerism in 75 AML patients (38 male, 37 female) who underwent myeloablative (n = 36)/reduced (n = 39) allo-HSCT with the risk of relapse and survival. Chimerism was evaluated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction for donor/recipient specific polymorphisms/Y-specific sequences.

Results: After HSCT, 40 patients (53%) achieved stable complete donor chimerism (≥ 99.0% of donor alleles), while 35 (47%) failed to achieve stable donor chimerism. Thirty-one patients (41%) showed decreasing donor alleles after having first achieved complete donor chimerism. To investigate the kinetics of mixed chimerism, patients were separated whether they showed subsequent increasing or decreasing donor alleles. Subsequent decrease of donor alleles was associated with relapses in 17 of 18 cases (94%), while no patient with subsequent increasing donor alleles relapsed (p < 0.001). Patients with mixed chimerism and increasing donor alleles had better 2-year disease-free survival (85%) than those with decreasing donor alleles (0%; p < 0.001).

Conclusions: The kinetics of mixed chimerism as assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction is an important prognostic predictor in the post-transplantation period of AML patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.exphem.2010.08.006DOI Listing
December 2010

Minimal residual disease diagnostics in patients with acute myeloid leukemia in the post-transplant period: comparison of peripheral blood and bone marrow analysis.

Leuk Lymphoma 2010 Oct;51(10):1837-43

Clinic for Stem Cell Transplantation, University Cancer Center Hamburg, Germany.

Considering the high relapse rates of AML after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant, research aims to improve post-transplant surveillance. To determine the value of peripheral blood (PB) for post-transplant minimal residual disease monitoring, we compared 38 PB and bone marrow (BM) sample pairs in 25 stem cell recipients with NPM1-mutated AML (12 males, 13 females, ages 21-73 years). NPM1A mutation levels and chimerism ratios were determined in non-separated BM/PB. We observed congruent results in 28/38 (74%). In 14/38 sample pairs (37%), BM and PB were negative for the NPM1A mutation. Fourteen sample pairs were positive in BM and PB, albeit at higher mutation levels in the BM in 11 cases (4- to 278-fold). Results were discordant in 10 cases (26%), with weakly positive mutation levels in the BM but negative levels in the PB. Cases with ≥0.2% NPM1A mutation level in BM were always positive in PB. Chimerism was concordant in BM and PB in 21/34 (62%) of sample pairs. In conclusion, MRD monitoring with qPCR for the NPM1 mutation and chimerism from non-separated PB contributes to surveillance in patients with AML in the post-transplant period, but even with highly sensitive qPCR there is a risk of failure to detect the mutation in PB.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/10428194.2010.508822DOI Listing
October 2010

Diagnosis of Toxoplasma gondii infection after allogeneic stem cell transplant can be difficult and requires intensive scrutiny.

Leuk Lymphoma 2010 Aug;51(8):1530-5

Interdisciplinary Clinic for Stem Cell Transplantation, University of Hamburg, Germany.

Infectious complications remain a major problem after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Specifically Toxoplasma gondii infection is a life-threatening condition in immunocompromised patients. In order to highlight the difficulties in obtaining an early and definitive diagnosis, we report three cases of toxoplasmosis after HSCT for hematologic malignancies: two cases of T. gondii retinochoroiditis, and one case of encephalitis. All patients had unrelated donors and received antithymocyte globulin; none had received trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole prophylaxis. Toxoplasmosis occurred early post-transplant and diagnosis was obtained by real-time PCR. In one case, the correct diagnosis could only be established by PCR analysis of a retinal biopsy specimen. Rapid diagnosis--by invasive approaches--and an immediate onset of antiparasite treatment are crucial to avoid disseminated and often lethal Toxoplasma infections in the post-transplant period. Post-transplant prevention strategies and treatment to control advanced infection in this setting are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/10428194.2010.494260DOI Listing
August 2010

Impact of JAK2V617F mutation status, allele burden, and clearance after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for myelofibrosis.

Blood 2010 Nov 20;116(18):3572-81. Epub 2010 May 20.

Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, Hamburg, Germany.

Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (ASCT) after reduced-intensity conditioning has become a reasonable treatment option for patients with advanced myelofibrosis. The role of characteristic molecular genetic abnormalities, such as JAK2V617F on outcome of ASCT, is not yet elucidated. In 139 of 162 myelofibrosis patients with known JAK2V617F mutation status who received ASCT after reduced-intensity conditioning, the impact of JAK2 genotype, JAK2V617F allele burden, and clearance of mutation after ASCT was evaluated. Overall survival was significantly reduced in multivariate analysis in patients harboring JAK2 wild-type (hazard ratio = 2.14, P = .01) compared with JAK2 mutated patients. No significant influence on outcome was noted for the mutated allele burden analyzed either as continuous variable or after dividing into quartiles. Achievement of JAK2V617F negativity after ASCT was significantly associated with a decreased incidence of relapse (hazard ratio = 0.22, P = .04). In a landmark analysis, patients who cleared JAK2 mutation level in peripheral blood 6 months after ASCT had a significant lower risk of relapse (5% vs 35%, P = .03). We conclude that JAK2V617F-mutated status, but not allele frequency, resulted in an improved survival and rapid clearance after allografting reduces the risk of relapse.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood-2009-12-260588DOI Listing
November 2010
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