Publications by authors named "Svein Aarseth"

12 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Doctors and social media.

Authors:
Svein Aarseth

Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen 2019 Sep 23;139(13). Epub 2019 Sep 23.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4045/tidsskr.19.0448DOI Listing
September 2019

The ethics of aesthetics.

Authors:
Svein Aarseth

Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen 2019 02 25;139(4). Epub 2019 Feb 25.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4045/tidsskr.18.0907DOI Listing
February 2019

The troubling duty to inform.

Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen 2018 09 3;138(13). Epub 2018 Sep 3.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4045/tidsskr.18.0463DOI Listing
September 2018

Rådet for legeetikk.

Authors:
Svein Aarseth

Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen 2017 Jan 24;137(2):88. Epub 2017 Jan 24.

Leder Rådet for legeetikk.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4045/tidsskr.16.1131DOI Listing
January 2017

Paperless migrants and Norwegian general practitioners.

Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen 2016 06 7;136(10):911-3. Epub 2016 Jun 7.

Avdeling for allmennmedisin Institutt for helse og samfunn Universitetet i Oslo.

Background: In Norway, the rights of paperless migrants are restricted. We wished to investigate the extent to which Norwegian general practitioners give treatment to this group and their grounds for doing so, as well as to identify the health problems that were presented.

Material And Method: In 2010, an online questionnaire was distributed to 3 994 general practitioners who were members of the Norwegian Medical Association.

Results: Altogether 1 027 GPs responded. Of these, 237 (23 %) reported to have treated paperless migrants. Mental problems, pregnancy-related issues and respiratory ailments were the most frequently reported reasons for contact. Of the 237 GPs who reported to have treated paperless migrants, altogether 166 (70 %) stated that they would continue to receive these patients.

Interpretation: The fact that most of the GPs who had treated paperless migrants would continue to receive this patient group and thus provide health services beyond this group’s entitlements, we regard as a wish to comply with the Code of Ethics for Norwegian doctors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4045/tidsskr.14.1304DOI Listing
June 2016

Children in Norway who have no right to medical treatment--do they exist?

Authors:
Svein Aarseth

Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen 2016 03 15;136(5):447-8. Epub 2016 Mar 15.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4045/tidsskr.16.0111DOI Listing
March 2016

[Re: Circumcision of boys].

Authors:
Svein Aarseth

Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen 2016 Jan 12;136(1):10. Epub 2016 Jan 12.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4045/tidsskr.15.1306DOI Listing
January 2016

[Payment for unused time].

Authors:
Svein Aarseth

Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen 2015 Apr 21;135(7):662. Epub 2015 Apr 21.

Rådet for legeetikk Den norske legeforening.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4045/tidsskr.14.1620DOI Listing
April 2015

Encouraging adolescents to contact their GP: a community-based trial.

Br J Gen Pract 2014 May;64(622):e262-7

Department of General Practice, Institute of Health and Society, University of Oslo, Norway.

Background: Adolescents, especially males, often fail to see their GP.

Aim: To determine whether an informative letter could enhance the accessibility and utilisation of healthcare facilities and services.

Design And Setting: A community-based trial in one town in Oslo, using a retrospective control group.

Method: GPs in one town in Oslo sent a personal, informative letter at the beginning of 2008 and 2009 to individuals in their practice population who were turning 16 years of age that year. The pooled data for the same year for each surgery were collected. Retrospective data from 1990 and 1991 served as controls for the intervention groups of data collected in 2006 and 2007 respectively. An International Classification of Primary Care-2 diagnosis was given for each contact.

Results: The proportion of adolescents in contact with a GP increased from 59% in the control group to 69% in the intervention group (P<0.001). For the males, the increase was from 54% to 72% (P<0.001). This reduced sex differences in healthcare seeking. For diagnoses mentioned in the informative letter the incidence rose from 38% in the control group to 55% in the intervention group (P<0.001). For the females, there was a non-significant increase in the proportion in contact with the GP, from 63% to 66% in control and intervention groups, respectively. The most frequent contact reasons were respiratory disorders, followed by general and unspecified complaints, skin disorders, musculoskeletal disorders, and psychological disorders. This pattern did not change because of the intervention.

Conclusion: An information letter about health problems and health rights (such as the protection of the adolescent's privacy) seems to enhance the accessibility and utilisation of GPs, as measured by contact rate, particularly for males.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3399/bjgp14X679688DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4001132PMC
May 2014

[Good intentions--hard realities].

Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen 2002 Feb;122(6):651-2

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February 2002
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