Publications by authors named "Susan Piggott"

8 Publications

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Minimally Invasive Dentistry: Parent/Carer Perspectives on Atraumatic Restorative Treatments and Dental General Anaesthesia to the Management of Early Childhood Caries.

Front Oral Health 2021 23;2:656530. Epub 2021 Apr 23.

WA Dental Health Services, Perth, WA, Australia.

Parents of children treated under dental general anaesthesia (DGA) have reported feelings of concern and anxiety. This study elicited the views of parents/carers (P/C) of children with early childhood caries (ECC) who participated in a randomised trial (core study) which tested the effectiveness of care under DGA or care using alternative minimally invasive Atraumatic Restorative Treatment and the Hall Technique approaches (ART/HT). P/C of children treated using the ART/HT (test) approach or care under a DGA (control) were interviewed. Focus group semi-structured interviews with P/C were undertaken in community facilities. The transcripts were read and inductively coded into domains to identify emergent themes. The codes were entered into NVivo software to assist data management and were further refined into broad themes. Seven grouped interviews with 14 participants were conducted and one test participant provided a written response. Four groups with eight test participants; two groups with four control participants; and one combined group with one test and one control participant were interviewed. Five broad themes emerged after thematic analysis: (1) Impacts on the child and the family; (2) Child-/family-centred care; (3) Timeliness of care; (4) Affordable care; (5) Accessible care. Impacts were related to that of the effects of the disease, and of the care for the disease. Child-centred/family-centred care (CCC) was a source of appreciation by P/C of both groups when it was experienced. Frustration at the lack of timely care of their child's treatment needs, coupled with the perceived expensiveness of care and difficulties in physically getting to the location for a specialist consultation was expressed by P/Cs in the study. The use of the ART/HT enabled the establishment of a relationship between the clinical team and the child and P/C which was central to the delivery of CCC. P/Cs in the DGA arm of the study expressed dissatisfaction more often with the issues of timely care, cost of care and accessibility of care. P/C of both groups were equally satisfied with the treatment, where treatment had been received in a timely, child-centred manner. The findings suggest that minimally invasive approaches which facilitated CCC are acceptable alternative options to the DGA and should be considered for the management of ECC. ACTRN12616001124426.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/froh.2021.656530DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8757745PMC
April 2021

Painful facial abscess.

J Fam Pract 2021 10;70(8):E5-E8

University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Family Medicine, Denver.

Any case of a chronic nonhealing lesion of the face should include this condition in the differential.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jfp.0287DOI Listing
October 2021

Atraumatic restorative treatments and oral health-related quality of life and dental anxiety in Australian Aboriginal children: A cluster-randomized trial.

Community Dent Oral Epidemiol 2021 Nov 23. Epub 2021 Nov 23.

Australian Research Centre for Population Oral Health, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia.

Objectives: The management of early childhood caries is challenging and the impacts of its treatment on child oral health-related quality of life (COHRQoL) and dental anxiety among Australian Aboriginal children is relatively unknown. The aim of the study was to compare the impact on COHRQoL and dental anxiety after approximately 12 months among Aboriginal children treated for early childhood caries (ECC) using the Atraumatic Restorative Treatment and the Hall Technique (ART/HT: test) or standard care (control).

Methods: Consenting Aboriginal communities in the North-West of Western Australia were randomized into early (test) or delayed (control) intervention for the management of ECC. Children and parents/carers completed a questionnaire at baseline and at follow-up. The questionnaire sought information on COHRQoL using the proxy-reported Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale (ECOHIS) and the self-reported Caries Impacts and Experiences Questionnaire for Children (CARIES-QC). The test group was provided with the ART/HT care at baseline while the control group was advised to seek care through the usual care options available within the community. At follow-up, both groups were offered care using the ART/HT approach. Changes in the mean scores from baseline to follow-up within groups were evaluated using appropriate paired (t-test, Wilcoxon paired test), and between groups with unpaired tests (t-test). Multivariate regression analysis after multiple imputations of missing data used generalized estimating equation (GEE) controlling for clustering within communities.

Results: Twenty-five communities and 338 children (mean age = 3.6 years, sd 1.7) participated in the study (test = 177). One child was excluded from the analysis because of a missing questionnaire and clinical data at baseline and follow-up. At baseline, test group children were older (test = 3.8 years, 95% CI 3.6-4.1;control = 3.3 years, 95% CI 3.1-3.6) and had higher caries experience (test dmft = 4.4, 95% CI 3.8-5.0;control dmft = 3.1, 95% CI 2.5-3.7), but there was no significant difference in COHRQoL or anxiety levels between the groups. At follow-up, parents in the delayed intervention reported worsening of COHRQoL (70% worsening of the family impact section of the ECOHIS and 37% worsening of the total ECOHIS scale), and there was an 8% reduction in child dental anxiety among the early treatment group.

Conclusions: The application of the ART/HT approaches was feasible, effective, and impacted positively on child oral health-related quality of life and child dental anxiety among Aboriginal children in remote communities. The model of care as tested in this study should be further developed for inclusion in main-stream service delivery programmes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdoe.12704DOI Listing
November 2021

Parent perceptions of minimally invasive dental treatment of Australian Aboriginal pre-school children in rural and remote communities.

Rural Remote Health 2021 11 18;21(4):6862. Epub 2021 Nov 18.

Dental Health Services, Health Department of Western Australia, Locked Bag 15, Bentley Delivery Centre ,WA 6983, Australia

Introduction: Aboriginal* children in rural and remote communities in Australia have a higher burden of dental decay and poorer access to dental services than their non-Aboriginal counterparts. In the Kimberley region of Western Australia (WA), Aboriginal children experience six times the rate of untreated dental decay of non-Aboriginal children. Access to dental care is challenged by the availability and appropriate delivery of services in remote locations. This study elicited the experiences and perceptions of parents and carers who participated in a project that tested the minimally invasive atraumatic restorative treatment and the Hall technique approaches (ART-HT) to manage early childhood dental caries among Australian Aboriginal preschool children.

Methods: The core study design was a stepped-wedge, cluster-community-randomised controlled trial. Consenting communities in the Kimberley region of WA were randomised into early and delayed intervention groups. Children were clinically examined at study commencement; the early intervention group was offered dental treatment using the ART-HT approach, and the delayed group was advised to seek dental care from their usual service provider. At the 12-month follow-up, children in both groups were re-examined and offered care using the minimally invasive model of care, and parents and carers were invited to take part in focus group or one-to-one interviews. Semistructured interviews, guided by the yarning approach, were conducted with consenting parents and carers in community locations of convenience to participants. The same open-ended questions were asked of all participants, and the interviews were audio-recorded with permission and transcribed by an independent agency. Thematic analysis was undertaken, the transcripts were coded by NVivo software, and emergent themes were identified and developed.

Results: One-to-one interviews were conducted with 29 parents and carers (10 from five test communities; 19 from eight control communities). Interview participants consisted of 3 males and 26 females. Following thematic analysis, three main themes (and subthemes) were identified: (1) access to care (barriers, service availability, impact on family due to lack of access); (2) experience of care (cultural safety, child-centred care, comprehensiveness of care); (3) community engagement (service information, engagement, oral health education). Structural and system factors as well as geography were identified as barriers by parents and carers in accessing timely and affordable dental care in culturally safe environments; parents and carers also identified the impacts from lack of access to care. They valued comprehensive care delivered within community, underpinned by child- and family-centred care. Of equal importance was the holistic approach adopted through the building of community engagement and trusting relationships.

Conclusion: A high level of satisfaction was reported by parents and carers with their experience of dental care for their children with the minimally invasive approach. Satisfaction was expressed around ease of accessing services delivered in a child- and family-centred manner, and that were well supported by appropriate engagement between service providers, communities and families. The findings from this study suggest a minimally invasive dental care model can be considered effective and culturally acceptable and should be considered in delivering oral health services for young children in rural and remote locations. * The term Aboriginal is inclusive of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.22605/RRH6862DOI Listing
November 2021

Clinical Inquiry: How do oral NSAIDs compare to other oral analgesics right after an acute musculoskeletal injury?

J Fam Pract 2018 02;67(2):110-111

University of Colorado Health Sciences Library, Aurora, CO, USA.

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are at least as effective as other oral analgesics (opioids, acetaminophen) in relieving pain in the first few days after an acute musculoskeletal injury. Evidence also indicates that using NSAIDs results in fewer adverse events than using narcotics (strength of recommendation [SOR]: A, systematic review of randomized controlled trials [RCTs], as well as individual RCTs).
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February 2018

A bump in the groin: Cutaneous actinomycosis.

J Family Community Med 2017 Sep-Dec;24(3):203

Department of Family Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Colorado, Denver, CO 80238, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/jfcm.JFCM_79_17DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5596635PMC
September 2017

Exploring moral distress in potential sibling stem cell donors.

Nurs Ethics 2013 Mar 2;20(2):178-88. Epub 2012 Nov 2.

Virtual University of Uganda, Uganda.

In relation to the phenomenon of moral distress, this article presents two original perspectives. First, the literature to date reflects a focus on moral distress in an occupational context. In this article, however, the impact of moral distress on siblings is explored. Moral distress is considered in a particular context, stem cell donation, but there are clear insights and implications for wider practice, particularly in life-threatening contexts and situations where live donation enhances the potential for survival. Second, the article represents some progress in relation to creating conceptual clarity. It is suggested that in addition to external and internal moral constraints a further classification of constraint emerges, and that this is useful in teasing out the distinction between moral stress and moral distress. The insights drawn from exploring the experiences of these siblings should enhance the ability to pre-empt and ameliorate potential distress and, ultimately, reduce harm.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0969733012452682DOI Listing
March 2013
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