Publications by authors named "Stephen Aaron"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Multiorgan Failure From Cryoglobulinemic Vasculitis Following Intravenous Immunoglobulin Replacement Therapy.

J Clin Rheumatol 2016 Dec;22(8):441-443

Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/RHU.0000000000000455DOI Listing
December 2016

Multifaceted support for a new medical school in Nepal devoted to rural health by a Canadian Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry.

Glob J Health Sci 2012 Sep 10;4(6):109-18. Epub 2012 Sep 10.

University of Alberta, Alberta, Canada.

Nepal and Alberta are literally a world apart. Yet they share a common problem of restricted access to health services in remote and rural areas. In Nepal, urban-rural disparities were one of the main issues in the recent civil war, which ended in 2006. In response to the need for improved health equity in Nepal a dedicated group of Nepali physicians began planning the Patan Academy of Health Sciences (PAHS), a new health sciences university dedicated to the education of rural health providers in the early 2000s. Beginning with a medical school the Patan Academy of Health Sciences uses international help to plan, deliver and assess its curriculum. PAHS developed an International Advisory Board (IAB) attracting international help using a model of broad, intentional recruitment and then on individuals' natural attraction to a clear mission of peace-making through health equity. Such a model provides for flexible recruitment of globally diverse experts, though it risks a lack of coordination. Until recently, the PAHS IAB has not enjoyed significant or formal support from any single international institution. However, an increasing number of the international consultants recruited by PAHS to its International Advisory Board are from the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada (UAlberta). The number of UAlberta Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry members involved in the project has risen to fifteen, providing a critical mass for a coordinated effort to leverage institutional support for this partnership. This paper describes the organic growth of the UAlberta group supporting PAHS, and the ways in which it supports a sister institution in a developing nation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5539/gjhs.v4n6p109DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4777003PMC
September 2012

Takayasu's arteritis progression on anti-TNF biologics: a case series.

Clin Rheumatol 2011 May 11;30(5):703-6. Epub 2011 Jan 11.

Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, 562 HMRC University of Alberta, T6G 2S2, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.

Takayasu's arteritis (TA) is a rare granulomatous vasculitic disease that affects the aorta and its major branches. Recent studies have suggested that anti-TNFα biological therapies are highly effective in treating TA refractory to conventional immunosuppressive therapy. We describe two patients with TA: one with progressive TA despite management with two different anti-TNFα agents, infliximab and adalimumab, and another who developed TA while treated with infliximab for the management of pre-existing Crohn's disease. From our observations, we believe that a multicentered randomized study should be designed to assess the extent of resistance to these agents when different therapeutic doses are employed for managing TA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10067-010-1658-1DOI Listing
May 2011

Scrotal involvement in an adult with Henoch-Schönlein purpura.

Clin Rheumatol 2013 Mar 9;32 Suppl 1:S93-5. Epub 2010 Sep 9.

Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Alberta Hospital, 562 Heritage Medical Research Center, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2S2.

Henoch-Schönlein purpura is a systemic vasculitis of unknown etiology usually affecting the pediatric age group and characterized by the clinical triad of non-thrombocytopenic palpable purpura, abdominal pain, and arthritis. There also may be varying degrees of renal involvement. The findings of scrotal involvement are not as well recognized. We describe a case of acute scrotal swelling as part of a 37-year-old male's presentation of Henoch-Schönlein purpura, a presentation that has not been reported in this age group.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10067-010-1555-7DOI Listing
March 2013

Moving up the pyramid: assessing performance in the clinic.

Authors:
Stephen Aaron

J Rheumatol 2009 Jun;36(6):1101-3

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.090085DOI Listing
June 2009

Opioids and chronic pain.

CMAJ 2003 Oct;169(9):902, 904; author reply 904

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC219619PMC
October 2003

A six-month randomized, controlled, double-blind, dose-response comparison of intravenous pamidronate (60 mg versus 10 mg) in the treatment of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug-refractory ankylosing spondylitis.

Arthritis Rheum 2002 Mar;46(3):766-73

University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.

Objective: To determine the safety and efficacy of intravenous (IV) pamidronate treatment in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients who have had a suboptimal response to nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

Methods: Pamidronate at 60 mg was compared with pamidronate at 10 mg rather than placebo in view of the high incidence of transient arthralgias upon first IV exposure to the drug. The drug were given monthly for 6 months in a randomized double-blind, controlled trial. The inclusion criterion was active disease (Bath AS Disease Activity Index [BASDAI] of > or = 4 or morning stiffness of > or = 45 minutes) despite stable NSAID therapy. The primary outcome measure was the BASDAI, and secondary outcomes included the Bath AS Functional Index (BASFI), Bath AS Global Index (BASGI), Bath AS Metrology Index (BASMI), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP) level, and percentage of patients achieving a reduction of > or = 25% in the BASDAI. Outcome assessments were done at -2, 0, 12, and 24 weeks, and analysis was by intent to treat.

Results: Eighty-four AS patients (67 men and 17 women; mean age 39.6 years and mean disease duration 15.1 years) were enrolled. Dosage groups were well matched at baseline for demographics, disease activity, and functional indices. At 6 months, the mean BASDAI had decreased by 2.22 (34.5%) in the 60-mg group and by 0.93 (15%) in the 10-mg group (P = 0.002). Significantly greater reductions in the 60-mg group were also noted for the BASFI (P < 0.001), BASGI (P = 0.01), and BASMI (P = 0.03). Significantly more patients achieved a reduction of > or = 25% in the BASDAI in the 60-mg group versus the 10-mg group (63.4% versus 30.2%; P = 0.004). Differences in ESR/CRP were not significant (NS). Withdrawals included 9 (20.9%) from the 10-mg group and 3 (7.3%) from the 60-mg group (P NS). Adverse events were confined to transient arthralgias/myalgias after the first IV infusion, occurring in 68.3% and 46.5% of patients in the 60-mg and 10-mg groups, respectively (P NS).

Conclusion: Pamidronate has dose-dependent therapeutic properties in AS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/art.10139DOI Listing
March 2002
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