Publications by authors named "Simona Bassi"

17 Publications

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GITMO REGISTRY STUDY ON ALLOGENEIC TRANSPLANTATION IN PATIENTS AGED OVER 60 FROM 2000 TO 2017. IMPROVEMENTS AND CRITICISMS.

Transplant Cell Ther 2021 Nov 21. Epub 2021 Nov 21.

Unit of Haematology and Stem Cell Transplant Centre, "San Camillo" Hospital, Rome, Italy.

Background: Nowadays, allogeneic stem cell transplantation (Allo-SCT) can be offered to patients up to the age of 70-72 years and represents one of the most effective curative treatments for many hematological malignancies.

Objectives: The primary objective of the study is to collect data from the allo-SCTs performed in Italy from 2000 to 2017 in patients over 60 years of age to evaluate the changes in safety and efficacy outcomes as well as their distribution and characteristics over time.

Study Design: The GITMO AlloEld study (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT04469985) is a retrospective, analysis of the allo-SCTs performed 30 Italian transplant Centers on older patients (≥ 60 years) from 2000 to 2017 (n=1,996).

Results: For the purpose of analysis, patients were grouped into three time periods: time A: 2000-2005, n=256 (12%); time B: 2006-2011, n=584 (29%); and time C: 2012-2017, n=1156 (59%). After a median follow-up of 5.6 years, the 5-year Non Relapse Mortality (NRM) remained stable (time A: 32.8%; time B: 36.2%; and time C: 35.0%, p = 0.5); the Overall Survival (OS) improved (time A: 28.4%; time B: 31.8%; and time C: 37.3%, p = 0.012); and the Cumulative Incidence of Relapse (CIR) reduced (time A: 45.3%; time B: 38.2%; time C: 30.0%, p < 0.0001). The 2-year incidence of extensive cGVHD reduced significantly (time A: 17.2%; time B: 15.8%; and time C: 12.2%, p = 0.004). Considering times A and B together (2000-2011), the 2-year NRM was positively correlated to the HCT-CI score; patients with HCT-CI of 0, 1 or 2, or ≥3 had rates of NRM of 25.2%, 33.9%, and 36.1%, respectively, (p < 0.001). Meanwhile, after 2012, the HCT-CI score was not significantlly predictive of NRM.

Conclusions: The study shows that the transplant procedure in elderly patients became more effective over time. Relapse incidence remains the major problem and strategies to prevent it are under investigation (e.g. post-transplant maintenance). Today, the selection of patients aged over 60 could be improved by combining HCT-CI and frailty assessments to better predict NRM.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jtct.2021.11.006DOI Listing
November 2021

Ibrutinib as a bridge to transplant in high-risk chronic lymphocytic leukemia: A case report and review of the literature.

Leuk Res Rep 2017 15;8:21-23. Epub 2017 Nov 15.

Hematology Unit and Transplantion Center, "Guglielmo da Saliceto" Hospital, via Taverna 49, 29100 Piacenza, Italy.

The treatment landscape of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has been challenged by the advent of novel classes of drugs, such as B-cell receptor (BCR)-inhibitors and BCL-2 antagonists. In selected high-risk patients, the choice to start allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHCT) or continue these agents is a matter of debate. Furthermore, published data about the impact on the feasibility of alloHCT and the optimal timing of administration are limited. Here we present a case of relapsed TP53 mutated CLL treated with ibrutinib as a bridge to alloHCT, discussing risks and benefits of different treatment options in a "real life" situation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lrr.2017.11.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5717301PMC
November 2017

Safety and efficacy of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor biosimilars in engraftment after autologous stem cell transplantation for haematological malignancies: a 4-year, single institute experience with different conditioning regimens.

Blood Transfus 2015 Jul 2;13(3):478-83. Epub 2015 Feb 2.

Haematology Unit and Bone Marrow Transplant Centre, "Guglielmo da Saliceto" Hospital, Piacenza, Italy.

Background: Filgrastim biosimilars have recently been introduced into clinical practice. To date biosimilars have demonstrated comparable efficacy and safety as the originator in chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. Published experience in engraftment after autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is limited and concerns relatively few patients.

Materials And Methods: With the aim of assessing the efficacy and the safety of filgrastim biosimilars in post-ASCT bone marrow recovery, we conducted a single institution, retrospective study in 56 lymphoma and myeloma patients who received filgrastim biosimilars (Tevagrastim(®) and Zarzio(®)) at standard doses from day 5. We compared our results with recently published data on the originator. A cost analysis of each biosimilar was performed.

Results: Neutrophil counts recovered in 55 patients. The median number of filgrastim biosimilar vials injected was seven per patient. The median time to neutrophil and platelet recovery was 10 and 12 days, respectively. Twenty-six patients had febrile neutropenia, in half of whom the agent involved was identified. In the cost analysis, the use of Tevagrastim(®) and Zarzio(®) was associated with cost reductions of 56% and of 86%, respectively.

Discussion: Despite differences in CD34+ cell counts and time of starting filgrastim, our results in terms of time to engraftment and median number of vials injected are similar to published data. Comparing our results by single conditioning regimen to recent literature data, the time to engraftment and duration of hospitalisation were equivalent. Significant differences were observed in the incidence of febrile neutropenia, perhaps due to different preventive and prophylactic protocols for infections. Although prospective studies should be performed to confirm our results, filgrastim biosimilars were found to be effective and safe in engraftment after ASCT.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2450/2015.0198-14DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4614302PMC
July 2015

A single dose of Pegfilgrastim versus daily Filgrastim to evaluate the mobilization and the engraftment of autologous peripheral hematopoietic progenitors in malignant lymphoma patients candidate for high-dose chemotherapy.

Transfus Apher Sci 2010 Dec 30;43(3):321-326. Epub 2010 Oct 30.

Haematoncology Division, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy.

Pegfilgrastim has equivalent efficacy to daily G-CSF in enhancing neutrophil recovery after chemotherapy, but conclusive data concerning its use for peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) mobilization are lacking. From 2003 to 2008 we used high-dose chemotherapy in 64 lymphoma patients. At mobilization chemotherapy (ESHAP) the first 26 patients used unconjugated G-CSF, while the remaining 38 patients received Pegfilgrastim. At the time of harvest 25 patients collected stem cells after the use of G-CSF and 36 in the Peg group. No statistical by significant differences were observed in median peripheral CD34+ cells mobilized (77 μL versus 71 μL) and in collected PBSC (12.3 × 10(6)/kg versus 9.4 × 10(6)/kg p = 0.76). In the PEG group all patients collected the target PBSC with a single apheresis with a greater proportion of "optimal" mobilizers (83% versus 64%; p = 0.05). In conclusion a single dose of Pegfilgrastim could be a valid alternative to unconjugated G-CSF to mobilize PBSC in lymphoma patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.transci.2010.10.001DOI Listing
December 2010

Long-term follow-up of patients with follicular lymphoma receiving single-agent rituximab at two different schedules in trial SAKK 35/98.

J Clin Oncol 2010 Oct 9;28(29):4480-4. Epub 2010 Aug 9.

Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Divisione di Ematologia, Milan, Italy.

Purpose: We report the long-term results of a randomized clinical trial comparing induction therapy with once per week for 4 weeks single-agent rituximab alone versus induction followed by 4 cycles of maintenance therapy every 2 months in patients with follicular lymphoma.

Patients And Methods: Patients (prior chemotherapy 138; chemotherapy-naive 64) received single-agent rituximab and if nonprogressive, were randomly assigned to no further treatment (observation) or four additional doses of rituximab given at 2-month intervals (prolonged exposure).

Results: At a median follow-up of 9.5 years and with all living patients having been observed for at least 5 years, the median event-free survival (EFS) was 13 months for the observation and 24 months for the prolonged exposure arm (P < .001). In the observation arm, patients without events at 8 years were 5%, while in the prolonged exposure arm they were 27%. Of previously untreated patients receiving prolonged treatment after responding to rituximab induction, at 8 years 45% were still without event. The only favorable prognostic factor for EFS in a multivariate Cox regression was the prolonged rituximab schedule (hazard ratio, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.39 to 0.88; P = .009), whereas being chemotherapy naive, presenting with stage lower than IV, and showing a VV phenotype at position 158 of the Fc-gamma RIIIA receptor were not of independent prognostic value. No long-term toxicity potentially due to rituximab was observed.

Conclusion: An important proportion of patients experienced long-term remission after prolonged exposure to rituximab, particularly if they had no prior treatment and responded to rituximab induction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1200/JCO.2010.28.4786DOI Listing
October 2010

Rituximab and subcutaneous cladribine in chronic lymphocytic leukemia for newly diagnosed and relapsed patients.

Leuk Lymphoma 2010 Aug;51(8):1485-93

Hematoncology Division, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy.

The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of combined treatment with rituximab and subcutaneous cladribine in patients with newly diagnosed and relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Forty-three patients with active CLL or small lymphocytic lymphoma received rituximab 375 mg/m(2) on day 1 and cladribine 0.1 mg/kg subcutaneously on days 2-6. The treatment was repeated every 4 weeks for a total of four cycles. Sixteen patients were pretreated. The overall response rate was 88% (50% complete remission and 38% partial remission). The median time to treatment failure was 37.9 months. Grade 4 neutropenia developed in 5% of patients. The data indicate that combination therapy with rituximab and cladribine is a valuable and safe treatment for patients with CLL.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/10428194.2010.495799DOI Listing
August 2010

Rituximab in lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin disease.

Oncology 2009 24;76(1):26-9. Epub 2008 Nov 24.

Division of Haematology-Oncology, Department of Medicine, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy.

Background: Lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin disease (LPHD) differs in biology and clinical behaviour from classic Hodgkin disease. Almost 100% of LPHD neoplastic cells express CD20 and thus rituximab could be effective; yet limited data are available.

Patients And Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis on patients with LPHD who were treated with rituximab at our institution to determine the magnitude of benefit offered by this drug.

Results: Seven patients were identified; 4 received the drug as single agent while the rest received it in combination with chemotherapy. All except 2 received the drug in the salvage setting. Response rate was 100% with 6 of 7 patients achieving complete remission. At a median follow-up of 2 years, 4 patients are still disease free while the rest relapsed at a median time of 27 months.

Conclusion: Rituximab is effective in LPHD and should be considered; however, the optimal schedule remains to be determined.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000177953DOI Listing
January 2009

Chronic myeloid leukemia in blast crisis treated with imatinib 600 mg: outcome of the patients alive after a 6-year follow-up.

Haematologica 2008 Dec 6;93(12):1792-6. Epub 2008 Oct 6.

Institute of Hematology and Medical Oncology L. and A. Seràgnoli, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.

Background: Imatinib mesylate is the first line treatment for chronic myeloid leukemia. In patients with advanced phase of the disease, the advent of imatinib significantly increased survival. However, few long-term data, based on large, prospective and controlled trials are available on the outcome of these patients.

Design And Methods: We conducted a phase II trial of imatinib 600 mg daily in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in blast crisis. The return to chronic phase was defined as <15% blasts and <30% blasts plus promyelocytes in blood or bone marrow and <20% peripheral basophils. A complete hematologic response required the normalization of platelet and white cell differential counts and absence of extramedullary involvement. Cytogenetic response was assessed by the standard banding technique and rated as usual.

Results: Ninety-two patients were enrolled (20 with lymphoid blast crisis and 72 with myeloid blast crisis). Forty-six patients (50%) returned to chronic phase, and 24 patients (26%) achieved also a complete hematologic response. Sixteen patients (17%) had a cytogenetic response (9 complete, 1 partial, and 6 minor or minimal). The complete cytogenetic response was subsequently lost by all but two patients between 2 and 12 months after first having achieved it: the median duration of complete cytogenetic response was 7 months. All responses were sustained for a minimum of 4 weeks. The median survival of all the patients was 7 months. After a median observation time of 66 months, seven (8%) patients are alive. Three of these patients are on imatinib treatment (1 in complete hematologic remission, 1 in partial cytogenetic response and 1 in complete cytogenetic remission). Three patients are in complete remission after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. One patient is alive in blast crisis, on therapy with a second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor.

Conclusions: Imatinib was effective and safe in the short-term treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia in blast crisis, but longer-term outcome was not significantly influenced (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00514969).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3324/haematol.13068DOI Listing
December 2008

Impact of age on the outcome of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in late chronic phase: results of a phase II study of the GIMEMA CML Working Party.

Haematologica 2007 Jan;92(1):101-5

Institute of Hematology and Medical Oncology Seràgnoli, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.

To assess the effect of age on response and compliance to treatment in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) we performed a sub-analysis within a phase II trial of the GIMEMA CML Working Party (CML/002/STI571). Since the WHO cut-off age to define an older patient is 65 years, among the 284 patients considered, we identified 226 (80%) younger patients (below 65 years) and 58 (20%) older patients (above 65 years) before starting imatinib. Response rates (hematologic and cytogenetic) were lower in the older age group but the probabilities of progression-free survival and overall survival (median observation time 3 years) were the same. Moreover, among complete cytogenetic responders, no differences were found in the level of molecular response between the two age groups. As might be expected, older patients experienced more adverse events, both hematologic and non-hematologic: this worsened compliance did not, however, prevent a long-term outcome similar to that of younger patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3324/haematol.10239DOI Listing
January 2007

Achieving a major molecular response at the time of a complete cytogenetic response (CCgR) predicts a better duration of CCgR in imatinib-treated chronic myeloid leukemia patients.

Clin Cancer Res 2006 May;12(10):3037-42

Institute of Hematology and Medical Oncology Seràgnoli, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.

Purpose: Most patients with chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) who receive imatinib achieve a complete cytogenetic remission (CCgR) and low levels of BCR-ABL transcripts. CCgR is durable in the majority of patients but relapse occurs in a subset.

Experimental Design: To determine the potential of quantitative reverse transcription-PCR of BCR-ABL to predict cytogenetic relapse, we serially monitored residual disease in 97 CML patients with an imatinib-induced CCgR. Patients with late chronic phase CML after IFN-alpha failure were treated with imatinib (400 mg daily).

Results: During the imatinib median follow-up time of 36 months (range, 12-54 months), disease monitoring occurred by cytogenetics and quantitative PCR. Twenty percent of patients experienced cytogenetic relapse at a median of 18 months after CCgR and a median of 24 months after starting imatinib. None of the possible prognostic factors studied in univariate and multivariate analyses seemed to predict for loss of cytogenetic response but the reduction of BCR-ABL transcript levels at the time of CCgR is an important prognostic factor.

Conclusions: In our study, we showed not only that achieving a major molecular remission at 12 months is predictive of a durable cytogenetic remission but also that patients who achieved a major molecular remission (expressed both as the BCR-ABL/beta2 microglobulin ratio % <0.0005 and as a 3-log reduction from median baseline value) already at the time of first achieving a CCgR have significantly longer cytogenetic remission durations than those without this magnitude of molecular response (P < 0.05).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-05-2574DOI Listing
May 2006

ABL mutations in late chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients with up-front cytogenetic resistance to imatinib are associated with a greater likelihood of progression to blast crisis and shorter survival: a study by the GIMEMA Working Party on Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

J Clin Oncol 2005 Jun 2;23(18):4100-9. Epub 2005 May 2.

Institute of Hematology and Medical Oncology Seràgnoli, University of Bologna, Via Massarenti 9-40138 Bologna, Italy.

Purpose: Point mutations within the ABL kinase domain of the BCR-ABL gene have been associated with clinical resistance to imatinib mesylate in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients. To shed further light on the frequency, distribution, and prognostic significance of ABL mutations, we retrospectively analyzed a homogeneous cohort of late chronic phase CML patients who showed primary cytogenetic resistance to imatinib.

Patients And Methods: Using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (D-HPLC) and sequencing, we screened for ABL mutations in a total of 178 bone marrow and/or peripheral blood samples from 40 late chronic phase CML patients homogeneously treated with imatinib 400 mg/d, who did not reach a major cytogenetic response at 12 months.

Results: Mutations were found in 19 of 40 patients (48%). Mutations were already detectable by D-HPLC at a median of 3 months from the onset of therapy. The presence of a missense mutation was significantly associated with a greater likelihood of subsequent progression to accelerated phase/blast crisis (P = .0002) and shorter survival (P = .001). Patients carrying mutations falling within the P-loop seemed to have a particularly poor outcome in terms of time to progression (P = .032) and survival (P = .045).

Conclusion: Our results show that, irrespective of the hematologic response, monitoring for emerging mutations in the first months of therapy may play a role in detecting patients with worse prognosis, for whom a revision of the therapeutic strategy should be considered.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1200/JCO.2005.05.531DOI Listing
June 2005

Imatinib and pegylated human recombinant interferon-alpha2b in early chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia.

Blood 2004 Dec 19;104(13):4245-51. Epub 2004 Aug 19.

Institute of Hematology and Medical Oncology L. and A. Seràgnoli, University of Bologna, Via Massarenti, 9-40138 Bologna, Italy.

Since interferon-alpha and imatinib (IM; STI571, Glivec, Gleevec) are effective for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), and their mechanisms of action are different, we designed an exploratory study investigating the effects of a standard IM dose (400 mg/d) and a variable pegylated interferon-alpha (PegIFN) dose (50 microg/wk, 100 microg/wk, and 150 microg/wk). The criteria for dose adjustment were designed so as to ensure the delivery of the IM dose and to protect life quality. There were 76 patients with previously untreated Philadelphia (Ph)-positive CML enrolled in the study. There were 3 patients who discontinued IM and 45 patients who discontinued PegIFN. The severity of adverse events increased with increasing PegIFN dose. The IM dose could be administered to the patients who were assigned to receive 50 microg/wk or 100 microg/wk PegIFN but not to those who were assigned to receive 150 microg/wk. The median administered dose of PegIFN ranged between 32 microg/wk and 36 microg/wk. The cytogenetic response was 70% complete (Ph-neg 100%) and 83% major (Ph-neg > 65%). The BCR/ABL transcript was reduced by at least 3 logs in 68% of complete cytogenetic responders. These data of toxicity, compliance, and efficacy may assist in the design and preparation of prospective studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood-2004-03-0826DOI Listing
December 2004

High-dose therapy with autologous transplantation for aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: the Bologna experience.

Leuk Lymphoma 2004 Feb;45(2):321-6

Institute of Hematology and Medical Oncology L. e A. Seràgnoli, University of Bologna, Italy.

Patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) who relapse after initial therapy have a poor prognosis and with standard dose salvage therapy the outlook remains poor. In this work we examine the patient characteristics and outcome of patients with aggressive NHL treated with HDT and autologous transplantation at our Institute from 1982 to 1999. A retrospective analysis was performed examining patient characteristics, prior chemotherapy regimens, pretransplant disease status, HDT regimen, source of stem cells, time for hematopietic recovery, complications of transplantation, response rates, overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS). One hundred and thirty-four patients with aggressive NHL were treated with estimated 10-year OS and RFS rates of 50% and 66%, respectively. Disease status (sensitive vs. refractory) pre-HDT was the most powerful predictive parameter for OS and RFS, at both univariate and multivariate analysis. For the entire cohort, transplant-related mortality was only 3.5% without evidence of second malignancies. Our results confirm that HDT with autologous transplantation is associated with a durable RFS in a remarkable proportion of aggressive NHL patients with very low global early and late toxicity. Improved patient selection, transplant timing, ongoing improvements in supportive care, and selected phase III trials should increase outcomes further.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10428190310001597900DOI Listing
February 2004

Molecular response to imatinib in late chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia.

Blood 2004 Mar 26;103(6):2284-90. Epub 2003 Nov 26.

Institute of Hematology and Medical Oncology L. and A. Serànoli, University of Bologna, Italy.

Imatinib is a tyrosine-kinase inhibitor that binds to ABL proteins and induces cytogenetic remissions in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). In these patients measuring response by molecular techniques is clearly required. We determined the cytogenetic and molecular response (CgR, MR) to imatinib in 191 patients with late chronic-phase Philadelphia-positive (Ph+) CML, previously treated with interferon alpha. MR was assessed with real-time quantitative (TaqMan) reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and was expressed as the ratio between BCR/ABL and beta 2-microglobulin x 100, the lowest level of detectability of the method being 0.00001. A complete CgR (CCgR) was achieved in 85 (44%) of 191 patients and was maintained for 2 years in 67 (79%) of 85 patients. A reduction of the transcript level of more than 2 logs was achieved in all but 9 patients with CCgR versus none of 23 with partial CgR. In the CCgRs the median value of the MR was 0.0008 after 12 months and 0.0001 after 24 months, with the transcript level undetectable in 22 cases. We conclude that in CCgRs the degree of MR may vary from 2 to more than 4 logs, and that there is a progressive decrease of transcript level by time. Only 1 of 22 negative cases has had a relapse as yet.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood-2003-07-2575DOI Listing
March 2004

High-dose therapy with autologous transplantation for Hodgkin's disease: the Bologna experience.

Haematologica 2003 May;88(5):522-8

Institute of Hematology and Medical Oncology, L.e A. Seragnoli, University of Bologna, Italy.

Background And Objectives: In this work we examine the characteristics and outcome of patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) treated with high-dose therapy (HDT) and autologous transplantation at our Institute between 1982 to 2000.

Design And Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed examining patients' characteristics, prior chemotherapy regimens, pre-transplant disease status, HDT regimen, source of stem cells, time for hematopoietic recovery, complications of transplantation, response rates, overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS).

Results: Ninety-seven patients with HD were treated and had estimated 10-year OS and RFS rates of 32% and 60%, respectively. Disease status (sensitive vs. refractory) before HDT was the most powerful predictive parameter for OS and RFS in both univariate and multivariate analyses. The rate of transplant-related mortality in the whole cohort was only 1% whereas the rate of second malignancies was 3%.

Interpretation And Conclusions: Our results confirm that HDT with autologous transplantation is associated with a durable RFS in a remarkable proportion of HD patients and that the procedure has a very low global early and late toxicity.
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May 2003

Risk and early cytogenetic response to imatinib and interferon in chronic myeloid leukemia.

Haematologica 2003 Mar;88(3):256-9

L. and A. Seràgnoli Institute of Hematology and Medical Oncology, St. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna University, via Massarenti 9, 40138 Bologna, Italy.

Background And Objectives: We compared the early cytogenetic response (CgR) to a combination of imatinib mesylate (Glivec, Novartis Pharma, Basel, Switzerland) and a pegylated form of human recombinant interferon-alpha2b (pegIFN-alpha2b, PegIntron, Schering Plough, Kenilworth, New Jersey, USA) with the relative risk, either according to Sokal's or Euro scoring systems.

Design And Methods: Seventy-seven patients with early chronic phase, previously untreated, Ph-positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) received a combination of imatinib mesylate (400 mg/day) and pegIFN-alpha2b (3 consecutive cohorts treated with 50, 100 or 150 mg/weekly). Fifty-seven patients have completed the first 6 months of treatment and are evaluable for CgR.

Results: After 6 months of treatment, the overall major CgR rate was 89% and 90% in low risk patients (Sokal's and Euro, respectively), 76 and 59% in intermediate risk and 23% and 17% in high risk patients. These differences were significant (p=0.0001 for Sokal and 0.001 for e).

Interpretation And Conclusions: For the first time, these data suggest that the early CgR rate to a imatinib mesylate-based regimen is significantly risk-related.
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March 2003
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