Publications by authors named "Sietske Aalbersberg"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Hamstrings co-activation in ACL-deficient subjects during isometric whole-leg extensions.

Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc 2009 Aug 15;17(8):946-55. Epub 2009 May 15.

Research Institute Move, Faculty of Human Movement Sciences, VU University Amsterdam, Van der Boechorststraat 9, 1081 BT Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

It has been reported that anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-deficient subjects increase the level of hamstrings activation and this has been interpreted as a means to cope with increased anterior tibial laxity in the knee. This study aimed to establish to what extent co-activation strategies in ACL-deficient subjects are load level and knee angle dependent. Eleven chronic ACL-deficient and 15 control subjects were positioned in a range of postures and asked to exert a feedback controlled vertical ground reaction force (GRF; 30, 60% and maximum), while horizontal forces were not constrained. Surface electromyography of the leg muscles and GRF were measured. In postures with the knee over and in front of the ankle, ACL-deficient subjects generated, respectively, 2.4 and 5.1% MVC more hamstrings activation than control subjects. Enhanced hamstrings co-activation in ACL-deficient subjects was more apparent in extended than in flexed knee angles. For both ACL-deficient and control subjects, hamstrings co-activation was larger in males than in females. It is concluded that ACL-deficient subjects show a task dependent increase in hamstrings co-activation, but its clinical significance remains to be shown.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00167-009-0802-4DOI Listing
August 2009

Orientation of tendons in vivo with active and passive knee muscles.

J Biomech 2005 Sep;38(9):1780-8

Institute for Fundamental and Clinical Human Movement Sciences, Faculty of Human Movement Sciences, Vrije Universiteit, Van der Boechorststraat 9, 1081 BT Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Tendon orientations in knee models are often taken from cadaver studies. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of muscle activation on tendon orientation in vivo. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images of the knee were made during relaxation and isometric knee extensions and flexions with 0 degrees , 15 degrees and 30 degrees of knee joint flexion. For six tendons, the orientation angles in sagittal and frontal plane were calculated. In the sagittal plane, muscle activation pulled the patellar tendon to a more vertical orientation and the semitendinosus and sartorius tendons to a more posterior orientation. In the frontal plane, the semitendinosus had a less lateral orientation, the biceps femoris a more medial orientation and the patellar tendon less medial orientation in loaded compared to unloaded conditions. The knee joint angle also influenced the tendon orientations. In the sagittal plane, the patellar tendon had a more anterior orientation near full extension and the biceps femoris had an anterior orientation with 0 degrees and 15 degrees flexions and neutral with 30 degrees flexions. Within 0 degrees to 30 degrees of flexion, the biceps femoris cannot produce a posterior shear force and the anterior angle of the patellar tendon is always larger than the hamstring tendons. Therefore, co-contraction of the hamstring and quadriceps is unlikely to reduce anterior shear forces in knee angles up to 30 degrees . Finally, inter-individual variation in tendon angles was large. This suggests that the amount of shear force produced and the potential to counteract shear forces by co-contraction is subject-specific.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbiomech.2004.09.003DOI Listing
September 2005

Co-contraction during static and dynamic knee extensions in ACL deficient subjects.

J Electromyogr Kinesiol 2005 Aug;15(4):349-57

Institute for Fundamental and Clinical Human Movement Sciences, Faculty of Human Movement Sciences, Vrije Universiteit, 1081 BT Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Co-contraction of the muscles is proposed in the literature as one of the strategies that anterior cruciate ligament deficient (ACLD) subjects can use to compensate the loss of ACL function. This study examined the response of ACLD and control subjects to different shear forces in isometric and slow-dynamic knee extensions. Twelve chronic ACLD and 10 control subjects performed submaximal positioning and slow-dynamic knee extensions (between 45 degrees and 5 degrees of knee flexion) with two external flexion moments both applied at two distances on the lower leg. The shear force was controlled by changing the moment arm without changing the moment. Electromyographic data were collected from knee flexor and extensor muscles. In the analysis of variance, no significant effect of subject group was found in positioning or slow-dynamic tasks across all muscles. The effect of knee angle was significantly different between the subject groups for biceps femoris in positioning and for rectus femoris in slow-dynamic tasks, but these effects were very small and will not have a great impact on the resulting shear forces. There was no interaction between moment arm and subject group. Therefore, the hypothesis that ACLD subjects increase co-contraction in situations with an increased shear load in positioning and slow-dynamic knee extensions could not be confirmed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jelekin.2004.12.005DOI Listing
August 2005

Are hamstrings activated to counteract shear forces during isometric knee extension efforts in healthy subjects?

J Electromyogr Kinesiol 2004 Jun;14(3):307-15

Institute for Fundamental and Clinical Human Movement Sciences, Faculty of Human Movement Sciences, Vrije Universiteit, Van der Boechorststraat 9, 1081 BT Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

The hamstring muscles have the potential to counteract anterior shear forces at the knee joint by co-contracting during knee extension efforts. Such a muscle recruitment pattern might protect the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) by reducing its strain. In this study we investigated to what extent co-activation of the knee flexors during extension efforts is compatible with the hypothesis that this co-activation serves to counteract anterior tibial shear forces during isometric knee extension efforts in healthy subjects. To this aim, it is investigated whether co-activation varies with the required knee extension moment, with the knee joint angle, and with the position of the external flexing force relative to the knee joint. With unaltered moment and muscle activation, distal positioning of the flexing force on the tibia causes higher resultant (muscular plus external) forward shear forces at the knee as compared to proximal positioning. In ten subjects, knee flexor and extensor EMG was measured during a quasi-isometric positioning task for a range (5-50 degrees) of knee flexion angles. It was found that the co-activation of the knee flexors increased with the extension moment, but this increase was less than proportional (p<0.001). The extension moment increased 2.7 to 3.4 times, whereas the activation of Biceps Femoris and Semitendinosus increased only a factor 1.3 to 2.0 (joint angle dependent). Furthermore, a strong increase in co-activation was seen near full extension of the knee joint. The position of the external extension load on the tibia did not affect the level of co-contraction. It is argued that these results do not suggest a recruitment pattern that is directed at reduction of anterior shear forces in the knee joint during sub-maximal isometric knee extension efforts in healthy subjects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jelekin.2004.01.003DOI Listing
June 2004
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