Publications by authors named "S Aaro"

39 Publications

Long-term follow-up of functioning after spinal surgery in patients with Rett syndrome.

Eur Spine J 2009 Apr 23;18(4):506-11. Epub 2009 Jan 23.

Orthopaedic Center, University Hospital, 581 85 Linköping, Sweden.

In a prospective study, 23 consecutive girls with Rett syndrome and neuromuscular scoliosis were evaluated for functioning at a long-term follow-up. The patients had mostly improved, which was confirmed by their parents. Rett syndrome is associated with neuromuscular scoliosis and has a typically long C-shaped thoracolumbar kyphoscoliosis. Prospective long-term follow-up studies related to these patients' total situation are sparse. Most studies focus on the Cobb angle of the scoliosis, whereas parents are mainly concerned about the girls' continued functioning. Twenty-three patients with Rett syndrome and neuromuscular scoliosis were evaluated preoperatively from 1993 to 2002. At follow-up, 19 patients remained in the study. Three patients died (not due to surgery), and one patient could not participate because it was too far to travel. Mean follow-up time was 74 months (range 49-99 months). The assessments comprised the sitting balance, seating supports in wheelchair, weight distribution, time used for rest, care given, and angle of scoliosis. Follow-up questionnaires and two-open-ended questions about the positive and negative effects of surgery were sent to parents. Sitting balance, number of seating supports in wheelchair, weight distribution, time used for rest, and the Cobb angle had all improved after surgery. The parents assessed improvement in seating position, daily activities, time used for rest, and cosmetic appearance. We can conclude that the stabilized spine resulted in sufficient strength to keep the body upright with the possibility of looking around at the surroundings more easily. The girls got better seating position with less need for seating adaptations in the wheelchair and with reduced time needed for resting during the day. Finally we can conclude that the indication for surgery is to get a better posture which lead to less risk of pressure sores, and that un upright position lead to better possibility to easily breath with fewer episodes of pneumonia and a better general health as result. The evidence of positive surgical effects for girls with Rett syndrome is of great importance in indication for surgery in the decision-making process.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00586-008-0876-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2899470PMC
April 2009

Long-term follow-up of functioning after spinal surgery in patients with neuromuscular scoliosis.

Spine (Phila Pa 1976) 2005 Oct;30(19):2145-52

Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.

Study Design: A prospective study of 100 consecutive preoperative patients with neuromuscular scoliosis whose activities and function were evaluated in a long-term follow-up.

Objectives: To evaluate long-term follow-up of functioning in patients with neuromuscular scoliosis.

Summary Of Background Data: Few studies of patients operated for neuromuscular scoliosis are prospective, with long-term follow-up based on assessments of activities and function.

Methods: The follow-up included 82 patients with neuromuscular scoliosis who were evaluated before surgery from 1992 to 1996. The follow-up time was 84.5 months on average. The assessments comprised sitting, angle of scoliosis, lung function, reaching, pain estimation, activities of daily living (ADL), care given, and time used for resting. A follow-up questionnaire as well two open-ended questions about the positive and negative effects of the surgery were sent to the patients/parents.

Results: Improvements after surgery were shown in the Cobb angle, lung function, seating position, ADL, and time used for resting. In a comparison between the 1-year follow-up and the long-term follow-up, there were further improvements in sitting, ADL, and care given but an increased Cobb angle. These results were in line with the assessments reported by patients and relatives. Only minor differences were shown in long-term outcome in subgroups according to understand/not understand verbal instructions. Patient age 21 years or less seemed more improved than those age 22 years and older at the time of surgery.

Conclusions: The comparison of the preoperative and long-term follow-ups showed that patients were mostly improved. Further improvements were shown beyond the 1-year follow-up. The subjective assessments also confirmed the results. The heterogeneity of patients with neuromuscular scoliosis makes it important to evaluate the patients in subgroups and in relation to age.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.brs.0000180403.11757.6aDOI Listing
October 2005

Weight distribution in the sitting position in patients with paralytic scoliosis: pre- and postoperative evaluation.

Eur Spine J 2002 Apr 18;11(2):94-9. Epub 2002 Jan 18.

Department of Orthopaedics, University Hospital, 581 85 Linköping, Sweden.

Patients with paralytic scoliosis spend most of their time in the sitting position. The spinal deformity, pelvic obliquity and uneven weight distribution on the seating surface necessitates frequent seating adaptations in the wheelchair. In this prospective study, 45 wheelchair-bound patients were evaluated preoperatively and 43 postoperatively. The pre- and postoperative evaluation was done by an independent observer. Surgical correction was performed between 1993 and 1996. Assessments included sitting balance on a box; number of seating supports in the wheelchair; weight distribution on the seating surface, measured with a computerized EMED system; Cobb angle; hip dislocation; mediolateral translation of T1 and of the apex vertebra with reference to a perpendicular line drawn upwards from the spinal process of S1; and pelvic obliquity from a line drawn between the most proximal points in the iliac crests. X-rays for the measurement of Cobb angle and pelvic obliquity were performed in sitting position. Reference values for normal weight distribution on the seating surface were obtained for 27 normal subjects and revealed a mean value of 59% of weight supported on one side. A stepwise regression analysis on the preoperative results showed that pelvic obliquity and thoracolumbar/lumbar spinal imbalance explained weight distribution on the seating surface (R(2)=0.45). There were significant improvements in all variables except in sitting balance and imbalance of T1, 1 year postoperatively. When dividing the material into two subgroups, the results showed no significant difference in any of the assessed parameters of the scoliosis, pelvic obliquity, or sitting position between individuals with even (50-59% on one side) and those with uneven (60-100% on one side) weight distribution postoperatively. The results of the assessment showed a significant improvement after surgical correction, but the majority still had pelvic obliquity and uneven weight distribution in a sitting position. The weight distribution on the seating surface preoperatively was explained by thoracolumbar/lumbar spinal imbalance and pelvic obliquity, with R(2)= 0.45. There were no significant differences in any variables in comparisons between individuals with even weight distribution and those with uneven weight distribution. For the group with even weight distribution, however, the mean pelvic obliquity was 6 degrees and in the group with uneven weight distribution the mean pelvic obliquity was 12 degrees. Attention to seating surface and adjustment of seating position is needed for patients with paralytic scoliosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00586-001-0373-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3610498PMC
April 2002

Limited effectiveness of intraoperative autotransfusion in major back surgery.

Eur J Anaesthesiol 2001 Dec;18(12):823-8

Department of Anaesthesia, University Hospital, S-581 85 Linköping, Sweden.

Background And Objective: The efficiency of intraoperative autotransfusion in scoliosis surgery is poorly known but needs to be evaluated, not least because of the large blood losses in these patients. This is a retrospective analysis of transfusion requirements of 43 such patients.

Methods: Records from 43 patients were studied. During surgery, the shed blood was salvaged and washed in an autotransfusion device (AT1000 Autotransfusion Unit) and a suspension of red cells was reinfused.

Results: Fifty-eight per cent of the intraoperative blood loss was salvaged. The total blood loss during the patients' hospital stay was calculated from the haemoglobin balance; 24% of this loss was salvaged by the device. Moreover, 36 of the patients needed allogeneic blood transfusion.

Conclusion: The efficiency of the autotransfusion device was relatively low in relation to the total extravasation, mainly because the postoperative blood loss is substantial.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2346.2001.01005.xDOI Listing
December 2001

Activities and functional assessment 1 year after spinal fusion for paralytic scoliosis.

Eur Spine J 1999 ;8(2):100-9

Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Linköping University, and Spine Center, University Hospital, Sweden.

The results of spinal fusion in patients with paralytic deformities are usually presented as the correction of the deformity. When evaluating the surgical results in such patients, it is advantageous to classify the patients into subgroups because of the varying dysfunction and disabilities. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of spinal fusion in patients with paralytic scoliosis in relation to function in terms of Impairments, activities in terms of Disabilities, and dependence in terms of Handicaps 1 year postoperatively, with emphasis on subgroups. A total of 94 patients with paralytic scoliosis and 18 different diagnoses were evaluated 1 year after surgery. The patients were classified according to whether or not they could understand verbal instructions. The patients were also grouped according to the Scoliosis Research Society classification of diagnoses. A set of instruments was used with the variables classified according to WHO's International Classification of Impairments, Disabilities, and Handicaps (ICIDH). This consists of the patient's/relative's motives for surgery, persistent skin discoloration, ambulating or use of wheelchair, use of a brace, sitting balance, weight distribution on a sitting surface, angle of scoliosis, reaching, pain estimation, activities of daily living (ADL) Klein and Bell, care given, time spent resting, and seating supports. The set of instrument also included a follow-up questionnaire comprising 12 different areas, where the patients/relatives assessed the results of surgery. The study showed that spinal fusion in paralytic scoliosis led to showed improvements in the whole group of patients at the Impairment level in the angle of scoliosis, sitting balance, weight distribution, and reduced number of patients with persistent skin discoloration, and at the Handicap level in reduced time for resting during the day, reduced number of seating supports in the wheelchair, and in the use of a brace. Most of the parameters were unchanged. The results in the subgroups were almost the same as in the whole group, although pain and reaching at the Impairment level, and ADL at the Disability level, could not be measured in the patients who were unable to understand verbal instructions. The subjectively assessed results showed that seating posture was ranked positively irrespective of the motive for surgery. The study showed that the patients with paralytic scoliosis maintained or improved their function and level of independence in terms of Impairment and Handicap 1 year postoperatively. The subjective results assessed by the patients/relatives also showed a positive outcome of surgery. Weight distribution on a seating surface was improved, but still uneven, and with respect to better sitting balance and increasing time sitting in a wheelchair, this can involve a risk for pressure sores and needs further investigation. When introducing outcomes including the Disability level, one must take the importance of homogeneity in the groups into consideration.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3611146PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s005860050137DOI Listing
July 1999
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