Publications by authors named "Rune Aakvik"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

[Paracetamol poisoning--occurrence and treatment].

Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen 2006 Jun;126(13):1731-3

Akuttmedisinsk avdeling, Medisinsk divisjon, Ullevål universitetssykehus, 0407 Oslo.

Background: Poisoning with paracetamol is common and potentially serious. We have assessed the incidence of paracetamol poisoning and the hospital's use of serum analyses to monitor the antidotal treatment N-acetyl cysteine.

Material And Methods: All hospital records of ICD-10 diagnoses T4n and T50.9 at the Department of Acute Medicine from July 2001 to July 2004, were retrospectively reviewed. All cases with possible or confirmed paracetamol poisoning were recorded. Liver damage was defined as ALT above 1,000 U/l. Standard European treatment nomogram was used.

Results: Of 869 admissions with acute poisoning, 158 (21%) were caused by paracetamol; of these 120 (76%) were women and 38 (24%) were men. 107 (68%) of the patients were treated with N-acetyl cysteine at admission due to suspected ingestion of more than 10 grams of paracetamol. Treatment was abrupted in 84 (79%) of the patients, as levels of serum paracetamol were below the treatment line in the nomogram. The median time from admission to sampling was 5 hours. Nine patients (6%), who all arrived later than 15 hours after ingesting paracetamol, developed liver damage. One woman died after a sub-acute overdose of paracetamol.

Interpretation: Few patients needed treatment with antidote. The treatment seemed to protect all against liver damage if started early. Liver damage and death was associated with admission later than 15 hours after intake.
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June 2006

[Adder bites in Norway--occurrence and treatment].

Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen 2004 Jul;124(13-14):1779-81

Akuttmedisinsk avdeling, Medisinsk divisjon, Ullevål universitetssykehus, 0407 Oslo.

Background: Adder bites rarely cause severe reactions and when they occur there are specific antivenoms with few side effects that may be used in addition to supportive therapy. The antivenom is manufactured from sheep and consists of Fab fragments.

Material And Methods: Between 1998 and 2002 there were 245 registered calls regarding adder bites to the Norwegian National Poisons Information Centre. We present three patients with adder bites treated with antivenom.

Results And Interpretations: The National Poisons Information Centre had 245 inquiries about adder bites over a five-year period. In 12% of cases the risk of intoxication was considered to be non-existent. Risk of or established mild to moderate reactions were found in 67%; 13% were considered to be in danger of severe reactions; the remaining 8% were unclassified. In severe adder bites, antivenom therapy has documented effect.
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July 2004
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