Dr. Robert John Zagar, PhD MPH - Juvenile Division Circuit Court of Cook County, ART LLC, Chicago School of Professional Psychology - Psychologist, General Manager, Professor

Dr. Robert John Zagar

PhD MPH

Juvenile Division Circuit Court of Cook County, ART LLC, Chicago School of Professional Psychology

Psychologist, General Manager, Professor

Chiago, Illinois | United States

Main Specialties: Abdominal Radiology, Adolescent Medicine, Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, Child Abuse Pediatrics, Child Neurology, Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics, Geriatric Psychiatry, Neurology, Pediatrics, Preventive Medicine, Psychiatry, Public Health, Statistics

Additional Specialties: Forensic neuropsychology

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0003-0029-7396


Top Author

Dr. Robert John Zagar, PhD MPH - Juvenile Division Circuit Court of Cook County, ART LLC, Chicago School of Professional Psychology - Psychologist, General Manager, Professor

Dr. Robert John Zagar

PhD MPH

Introduction

Robert’s research resulted in US Presidential executive decisions freeing 6,800 federal nonviolent prisoners by commutation and pardon, US Supreme Court decision (Miller v Alabama, Graham v Florida) causing the re-sentencing of 2,500 juveniles with life sentences without parole, an Act of Congress on predictive analytics for military and veterans, and the recent Illinois bill signed by Governor Rauner reforming the prison system.. After Dr. Zagar gave Mayor Daley “Predicting and Preventing Homicide a Cost Effective Empirical Approach from Infancy to Adulthood,” the entire February 2009 issue of Psychological Reports, volume 104, 1-377, the University of Chicago opened a Crime Lab to coordinated city policy. Robert shared his research with Cook County President Preckwinkle 25 September 2011 resulting in a 56% reduction in Cook County prisoners. Dr. Zagar testified before the. U.S. House of Representatives Judiciary Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism and Homeland Security 24 July 2012 on how his predictive algorithm saved 324 lives and $2.089B from 2009 to present in Chicago resulting in over 130 million in USDOJ and Chicago Public Safety Funds. Over the past decade 640 lives have been saved and 147,243 high risk youth were served with what is now known as the Summer Plus Program. In 2018, 32,223 youth got jobs, mentors and anger management. After Drs. Garbarino and Zagar shared their 2016 paper with Pope Francis he ordered all pedophile moving bishops to be removed by canonical court hearing. In February 2019 the Vatican organized a conference for "The Protection of Minors in the Church." President Trump after reading Dr. Zagar's work began speaking about violence as a "mental health issue," obtaining the NRA endorsement and reforming the justice system the First Step Act, which will release 53,000 over the next decade. Dr. Zagar is a registered clinical and certified school psychologist on National Register of Health Care Psychology Providers, a probation officer of the “first” Juvenile Court (1899) if Cook County. As an economist, Robert designed Mitsubishi plant and Illinois Labor Unemployment Compensation Act Lawyer Rewrite Committee human resources selection, and Motorola work sharing programs. Robert taught at Northwestern, Illinois at Chicago, Argosy, Barry, DePaul, and Lewis Universities, Chicago, Illinois and Forest Schools of Professional Psychology, and Calumet College. For three decades Robert is an expert witness in competency, crime, custody, personal injury, presentencing, workman’s compensation, among others. Before his doctorate he performed 1,000 neuropsychological exams. Robert completed a doctorate from Northwestern University in research design and statistics (the best program in the world), a bachelor’s from University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, a master’s from Illinois Institute of Technology, and University of Illinois at Chicago, NIMH national service award fellowships in sleep disorders at Rush University Medical School, and prevention at University of Illinois Medical Center, 2 years of pre-medical sciences at DePaul, and 2 years basic medical sciences at Barry Universities. Robert served on the American Psychological Association Youth Violence Committee and on the international example of how to deal with pedophilia, the Chicago Archdiocese Committee for Clergy Abuse. He is the son of a U.S. Navy Seal who served behind enemy lines in China during WWII and US Navy Wave. Robert was born at Great Lakes Navy Base Hospital. His wife Agatha, an actress, banker and teacher, is from Poland. They are both members of the University Club of Chicago and Holy Name Cathedral parish.

Primary Affiliation: Juvenile Division Circuit Court of Cook County, ART LLC, Chicago School of Professional Psychology - Chiago, Illinois , United States

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Research Interests:


View Dr. Robert John Zagar’s Resume / CV

Education

Jan 2018
Barry University
2 years basic med
Basic medical sciences
Jun 1983
De Paul University
2 years pre-med
Pre-medical sciences
Jan 1982
University of Illinois at Chicago
Jun 1981
University of Illinois Health Sciences Center School of Public Health
M.P.H.
Public Health
Jan 1981
Northwestern University
Jun 1980
Northwestern University
Ph.D.
Research Design
Dec 1975
Illinois Institute of Technology
M.S.
Psychology
Jan 1975
Illinois Institute of Technology Institute of Psychology
Dec 1973
University of Wisconsin
B.A.
Psychology
Jan 1973
University of Wisconsin Milwaukee
BA

Publications

70Publications

205Reads

1148Profile Views

1PubMed Central Citations

Can the WRAT-4 Math Computation Subtest Predict Final Grade In College-level Science

Review of European Studies; Vol. 10, No. 4; 2018

Review of European Research

Can the WRAT-4 Math Computation Subtest Predict Final Grade In College-level Science

Robert John Zagar, Ph.D., M.P.H., Juvenile Division, Circuit Court of Cook County

Joseph W. Kovach, Psy.D., Calumet College of St. Joseph

Ahmed Lakhani, Ph.D., Calumet College of St. Joseph

Tracy Stone, M.S., Calumet College of St. Joseph

Ishup Singh, B.A., Calumet College of St. Joseph

Mariana Portela, B.S., Calumet College of St.  Joseph

Bernie Berroa, B.A., Calumet College of St. Joseph

Abstract

Seventy-one, freshman through senior undergraduate college students 28 males and 43 females, M age =22.34 yr., SD = 4.20 in 5 different science classes were administered the Wide Range Achievement Test Fourth Edition (WRAT-4) Math Computation Subtest. Predictive validity coefficients were calculated relative to the criterion of the final class grade. The validity coefficient for the pre-course WRAT score was statistically significant. The WRAT-4 Math subtest can be used by instructors to examine performance on specific items to judge the appropriateness of a student’s placement in either entry-level or advanced science courses. However, high school grades are also a good predictor of completing the college curriculum and should be used along with math computation skills scores. Also motivation to complete college level science courses and socioeconomic status may be covariates in predicting college science final grade and eventual graduation from college.

Key Words: Math computation, prediction, college science course final grade

            Discovering the factors related to why students drop out of college science courses is an important goal nationwide. With the current shortage of engineers and scientists, college science dropout is a costly liability requiring recruiting foreign trained engineers and scientists. Given the high failure rate of foreign trained engineers and scientists, preparing more native born engineers and scientists is a high priority. Students have increased lifetime earnings potential upon graduation from college, with improved standard of living and increased productivity and efficiency. Retaining more science student has been studied intensively, but with little improvement in graduation rates. Given that student engagement and interest is the single most important factor in staying in college science courses (Tinto, 2006), and that college math is one of the more difficult endeavors in the college (Parker, 2004), proficiency in algebra and math, staying in a science college curriculum, and graduation seem to be linked (Madison, Linde, Decker, Rigsby, Dingman, and Stegman, 2015; Renaissance, 2017; 2018). 

The United States teaches more math and science than other countries globally and rich American students perform equally compared to other nation’s students (Brown and Brown, 2007). Attitude towards math and math test performance predict college math course success (Chen, Bai, Battista, Qin, Chen, Evans and Menon, 2018). Math skills and math course grades predict college science course success (Irman, Nasor, and Hayati, 2012; Hudson and Rottman, 1981). High school and college math and science grades plus ability tests predict college science course success (Malo, 1976; Nordstrom, 1990; Creech and Sweeder, 2012; Pembridge and Verleger, 2013; Flurry, 2015; Hodara and Lewis, 2017; Schaffhauser, 2017). Socioeconomic status, namely sufficient funds to complete college determine graduation.

If reliable and valid objective information concerning math achievement predictive of success in college science courses were available, progress could be made toward correct placement and better retention of college engineering and science students. This will not only benefit the college science student, but also assist college admission committees' selections of those best suited for science careers in curricula where math is crucial and college science faculty for planning purposes. Historically, some colleges admit by qualified open admission those applicants who do not have course prerequisites. The goal of this paper is to determine whether a math computation achievement test could predict college science course grade confirming prior research.  

                                    Methods

 Participants: Data were gathered from a convenience sample of 71 undergraduate science students (28 men, 43 women) with a M age= 22.34 (S.D. =4.20) years old at Calumet College of Saint Joseph. The sample was made of 17 African American students, 37 White American, 16 Hispanic American, and 1 Asian American student. All research participants were admitted to college through conventional qualified open admissions processes. See Table 1.

TABLE 1

Demographic Characteristics of 71 College Science Students

 

%

n 

 

Male

39

28

 

Female

61

43

 

Race

African American

24

17

 

 Asian American

 White American

 1     

52    

1

37

 

 Hispanic American

23

16 

 

 Age, M age yr.S.D.age yr.

22.34

 4.20

 

 

 

 

 

Measures: The Wide Range Achievement Test-Fourth Edition (WRAT– 4) Math Computation Subtest (Wilkinson and Robertson, 2004). Test-retest reliability was .87 for the two alternate forms used. The WRAT–4 assesses basic academic skills necessary for effective learning, communication, and thinking, including performing basic math calculations. The WRAT–4 contains subtests of Letter and Word Recognition, Sentence Comprehension, Spelling, and Math Computation; only the latter was administered in this study. Math Computation evaluates the person’s performing basic arithmetic skills through counting, identifying numbers, solving simple oral problems, and calculating written math problems in addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, fractions, decimals, and algebra. It is based on a representative national sample of over 3,000 persons, aged 5 to 94 years, selected according to a stratified national sampling procedure with proportionate allocation controlled for age, gender, ethnicity, geographical region, and educational attainment as an index of socioeconomic status.  The WRAT–4 has scaled scores, percentiles, stanines, normal curve equivalents, Rasch ability scaled scores, age-based, and grade-based norms, increasing the usefulness of the tests in Grades K-12. The age-based norms start at five years and extend to a maximum age of 94 years. With easy administration and scoring, a significant amount of information is gained from a relatively brief investment of testing time. The alternate forms can be used interchangeably with comparable results or combined into a single examination. Administration time for five to seven-year-olds is 15 to 20 minutes, and for 8 years and older, 30 to 45 minutes. The WRAT–4 allows for collecting initial data, screening large groups, diagnosis of specific learning disorders, evaluating cognitive disorders, pre- and post-testing, assessing academic progress, and determining minimal proficiency for educational and/ or vocational settings. For the WRAT–4 Math Computation Subtest, Cronbach's α = .87. Concurrent validity with the Wechsler Individual Achievement Test Second Edition (WIAT–II) has been reported as r = .92 (p < .01; Wechsler, 2001).

Grades: Raw test scores on the WRAT–4 Math Computation Subtest were obtained. At the end of the semester, final grades were calculated by the course instructor and submitted, in accordance with the course syllabus and college catalogue.

Procedures: The WRAT–4 Math Computation subtest was administered soon after the course began. Participants' science course grades were compared with the results of the WRAT–4 Math Computation Subtests. Scores from the WRAT–4 Math Computation Subtest met the assumptions of multiple regression analysis, namely, being normally distributed with statistically significant (p < .01) homogeneity of variance. The math computation scores were subjected to simple regression analysis, with the final numerical course grade as the criterion.

Results

As shown in Table 2, correlations and beta coefficients are consistent with the fact that the WRAT–4 Math Computation Subtest was a statistically significant predictor of success in these college science courses. WRAT–4 Math Computation Subtest scores accounted for a statistically significant (p < .01) proportion of the criterion variance (8.3%). The mean pre-course WRAT–4 Math Computation Subtest raw score for the group of students who passed was 43.26 (SD = 5.29), and for those who failed 30.14 (SD = 3.76) (t = 3.62, p < .01).

 

TABLE 2

Coefficients for Variable Entered Hierarchically Into Regression Analysis to Predict

Final College Science Grade

Standardized Unstandardized

Correlation

                         Model                                 Coefficients                  Coefficients               t                 p

 

 

B

SE  

 β

 

 

Model 1

(Constant)

59.03

7.89

 

7.49

.01

 

WRAT-4 Math

 0.66

 0.18

.42

3.62

.01

Note In Model 1, the WRAT–4 Math Computation score was used as a predictor or independent variable. The dependent variable (to be predicted) was the final college science grade.

                                                            Discussion

The results of this study are consistent with the hypothesis that the WRAT–4 Math Computation Subtest is a valid predictor of passing a college level science course. However, given that overall high school grades have a correlation coefficient of .37 with college grades (Zwick and Sklar, 2005), as compared with the .42 found in this study, continued use of the WRAT–4 Math Computation Subtest as a screening test for students taking different college level science courses seems warranted if used along with high school grades. Since the university already uses an objective test at admission for verbal and math achievement, perhaps adding another test may be redundant. Although the WRAT–4 Math Computation Subtest only takes 10 to 15 minutes to administer in the science course and its cost is minimal, its overall simple prediction of a pass/fail outcome is as good as high school grades, which both explain approximately 40% of the variance in completing college level science classes successfully (Zwick and Sklar, 2005).

Since the WRAT–4 Math Computation Subtest material is similar to what is learned in high school curricula, the individual's ability to perform basic math skills through counting, identifying numbers, solving simple oral problems, and calculating written math problems in addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, fractions, decimals, and algebra, is of qualitative value for instructors, who can examine the test booklets to see if individual college students can perform such problems. Thus, the instructor can act as a safeguard by assigning additional practice on specific types of problems, or offering tutoring to individual students, or explaining to students the value of moving to a lower level class. Perhaps also math and science college instructors might wish to use Khan academy to supplement skills already learned in high school or early college classes since the 10 to 20 minute youtube.com vignettes are easy to understand and students can repeat the lessons online as many times as needed to understand the basic concepts since some pupils are quick learners and others require repetition. The major limitation of this study was the small, non-random sample. The findings here may not generalize to all American science college students. Predicting college success is challenging, but some of the problems associated with admitting unprepared students may be ameliorated by allowing instructors to use additional testing and to advise specific students to obtain tutoring or take preparatory classes or watch Khan Academy youtube.com vignettes tailored to their level of success as shown on objective math tests.


References

Brown, A.S. & Brown, L.L. (2007). What Are Science & Math Test Scores Really Telling U.S.? The Best of Tau Beta Pi, winter, 13-17. Retrieved at: https://www.tbp.org/pubs/Features/W07Brown.pdf

Chen, L., Bai, S.R., Battista, C., Qin, S., Chen, T., Evans, T.M., & Menon, V. (2018). Positive attitude towards math supports early academic success: behavioral evidence and neurocognitive mechanisms, Developmental Psychology. doi: 10.1177/0956797617735528

Creech L.R, & Sweeder R.D. (2012). Analysis of student performance in large-enrollment life science courses. CBE Life Science Education, 11, 386–391

Hodara, M., & Lewis, K. (2017) How well does high school grade point average predict college performance by student urbanicity and timing of college entry? Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education (February). Retrieved at: https://edexcellence.net/articles/do-grades-or-test-scores-better-predict-new-students%E2%80%99-success-in-credit-bearing-college

Hudson, H. T. and Rottman, R.M. (1981). Correlation between performance in physics and prior mathematics knowledge, Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 18, 291-294. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrarywiley.com/doi/10.1002/tea.3660180403/abstract

Imran, A., Nasor, M., & Hayati, F. (2012). Relating Grades of Math and Science Courses with Students’ Performance in a Multi-Disciplinary Engineering Program – A Gender Inclusive Case Study. Procedia-Social and Behavioral Sciences, 46, 3989-3992.

Madison, B.L, Linde, C.S., Decker, B.R., Rigsby, E.M., Dingman, S.W., & Stegman, S.E. (2015). A Study of Placement and Grade Prediction in First College Mathematics Courses, PRIMUS, 25:2, 131-157, DOI: 10.1080/10511970.2014.921653

Malo, D.D. (1976). Relationships between course performance and student backgrounds I in an introductory soil science course. Journal of Agronomic Education, 6, 20-24/

Nordstrom, B. H. (1989). Predicting Performance in Freshman Chemistry, (p. 15).

Parker, M. (2004) Placement, retention, and success: a longitudinal study of mathematics and retention. Journal of General Education, 54, 22-40.

Pembridge, J.J. & Verleger, M.A. (2013). First-Year Math and Physics Courses and their Role in Predicting Academic Success in Subsequent Courses, 120nd American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference and Exposition, Atlanta, Georgia. Retrieved at: file:///C:/ /Downloads/Pembridge_Verleger_ASEE_2013%20(1).pdf

Renaissance. (2017). Trends in student outcome measures: The role of individualized math practice. Wisconsin Rapids, WI: Author.

Renaissance. (2018). Math milestones: The critical role of math achievement in student success. Author. Retrieved at: https://www.renaissance.com/2018/03/22/blog-math-milestones-critical-role-math-achievement-student-success/

Schaffhauser, D. (2017). GPA Versus Exam Scores: What's Better in Predicting College Success? The Journal. March, 9. Retrieved at: https://thejournal.com/articles/2017/03/09/gpa-versus-exam-scores.aspx

Tinto, V. (2006) Research and practice of student retention: what's next? Journal of College Student Retention, 8, 1-19.

Wechsler, D. (2001) Wechsler Individual Achievement Test manual. New York: Psychological Corp.

Wilkinson, G. S., & Robertson, G. J. (2004) Wide Range Achievement Test Fourth Edition (WRAT–4) professional manual. Lutz, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources, Inc.

Zwick, R., & Sklar, J. C. (2005) Predicting college grade and degree completion using high school grades and SAT scores. American Educational Research Journal, 42, 439-464.

 

TABLE 3

Summary of Hierarchical Regression Analysis for Final College Science Grade

Model

R 

 R 2

Adjusted

 R 2

 SE of Estimate

Change  R 2 Change

 

Statistics

 

 F

Change

 df 1             df 2

 p

1

.37

.175

.162

7.60

.175

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17 Reads

Predicting and Preventing Homicide: A Cost Effective Empirical Approach from Infancy to Adulthood

Psychological Reports 2009, 104, 1-3777

Psychological Reports

A special issue of a peer reviewed scientific journal was created because Zagar & colleagues studies on violence & homicide among abused infants, children, youth, & homicidal or sex offending youth & adults required full commentary from authors & coauthors. Implications for psychology, physiology, economics, criminology are of interest to business, human resources, police, military, nuclear power, and airlines. The focus is on reducing violence, saving lives and reducing costs related to the criminal justice system, incarceration, & the pain & suffering of victims. The 14 articles are written as a book with how to find a killer, what works to prevent murder, & how much homicide costs. Practical applications for screening & fitness for duty are covered.

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February 2009
14 Reads

Asking the right questions to find teenage killers

Page 4

Syllabus and Proceedings of the American Psychiatric Association Annual Meeting

3 groups of 1001 each, teen murderers, nonviolent delinquents, & controls matched by age, gender, race & SES were examined for criminally violent relatives, physical abuse, gang membership, alcohol-drug abuse, weapons, prior arrests, neurologic disorders, truancy, & school problems. Bayesian probabilities, odds, logistic regression & discriminant analyses were done. Murderers often had only 1 parent, violent relatives, physical abuse, gang membership, alcohol-drug abuse, doubling their chance of killing. Adding weapons, arrests, neurologic disease, truancy, school problems tripled to quadrupled their chances. With more risks, odds rise. True positive rates for killers was 100% while false positive was 95%. Murderers had the most risks, while nonviolent delinquents most and controls the least. Early onset killers had lower IQ, multiple arrests compared with late onset murderers. A developmental, neurologic, economic and psychosocial vulnerability model is proposed.

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May 2000
14 Reads

Adolescents in Turmoil: Part IV: Chapter 14 Adolescents Who Kill: Are There More Medical Risks?

Praeger Westport Connecticut London

101 adolescent murderers were matched with 101 nonviolent delinquents & examined; 10 statistical tests resulted in similar results. Killers had more injuries from physical abuse, retardation, allergy, hyperactivity, visual loss, epilepsy, jaundice, headaches, insomnia& syncope than controls. Murders had criminally violent families, physically abusive parents, gang membership, alcohol & substance abuse, weapon access, prior arrests, neurological disorders including retardation, truancy, suspension, expulsion & school underachievement. Poor socialization and risk combined to limit access to family networks and labor markets. Earlier interventions are cheaper & more effective.

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August 1998
11 Reads

Juvenile Murderers

International Society for Adolescent Psychiatry Third National Convention

101 juvenile murderers were matched with 101 nonviolent delinquents on age, race, sex & SES & examined. Using discriminant analyses, t-tests & nonparametric tests homicidal teens had more criminally violent families, weapon possession, gang membership, prior arrests, conduct disorder, truancy, suspension, expulsion, alcohol & substance abuse, severe learning difficulties, mental retardation, epilepsy, medical disorders, hyperactivity, & underachievement.

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June 1992
12 Reads

101 Adolescents Who Kill

Ontario Psychologist

Homicidal adolescents had more criminal families, gang membership, alcohol abuse, learning difficulty, retardation, & epilepsy than nonviolent delinquent controls when 101 were compared using discriminant analyses, t-tests & nonparametric tests.

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May 1992
80 Reads

Medical, Family and Scholastic Conditions Among Delinquents

Journal of Clinical Psychology

Medical, family & scholastic conditions were evaluated among 1962 delinquents using multivariate & univariate analyses of variance with post hoc tests. Findings supported a developmental bio-psychosocial model of delinquency. Orphaned or 1 parent delinquents with nervous system or neonatal conditions, retardation or hyperactivity committed assault.

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May 1991
9 Reads

Homicidal Adolescents: A Replication

Psychological Reports

30 homicidal delinquents were matched with 30 nonviolent delinquents on age, race, sex & SES and received examinations. Data were evaluated with step wise discriminant analysis with prior functions developed on a sample of 70 homicidal delinquents. Criminally violent families, gang participation, alcohol abuse and severe learning difficulties were present among homicidal. Juvenile murderers lived among criminally violent families learning aggression early in childhood. Cognitive & perceptual deficits associated with epilepsy & CNS conditions led to school year difficulties. During adolescence gang participation & alcohol abuse added to earlier risk factors.

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December 1990
20 Reads

Adolescents WHo Kill

Journal of Clinical Psychology

71 delinquent murderers were matched with 71 nonviolent delinquents on age, sex, race & SES and examined. Groups were compared with stepwise discriminant analyses, matched pairs two tailed t & nonparametric tests. Killers had criminally violent families, gang membership, severe educational difficulties & alcohol abuse.

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July 1990
18 Reads

Developmental and Disruptive Behavior Disorders Among Delinquents

Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry

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January 1989
19 Reads

Managing out-patient rehabilitation facilities: a resource dependency perspective.

J Health Hum Resour Adm 1986 ;8(4):393-410

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October 1986
5 Reads

Organizational Variation & Environmental Uncertainty in Rehabilitation

Journal of Human Health Resources Administration

Consistent with resource dependency considerable variation in organizational market, technology & structure among rehabilitation facilities exists. Threats & opportunities in larger political economic environment including government economy & professional groups not local market conditions or intra industry competition dominated managerial planning. Managers at hospital based & freestanding facilities borrowed perceived successful strategies from one another to increase chances of acquiring additional patients & financial support in this competitive market place. Freestanding organizations intended to move closer to the medical arena of hospital based facilities to maximize reimbursement & referrals while hospital based facilities adopted the freestanding facilities marketable concept of "rehabilitation" to maximized revenues.

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March 1986
11 Reads

Developmental Analysis of the Wechsler Memory Scale

Journal of Clinical Psychology

Memory is one of the central intellectual functions characteristic of human behavior. Factor analytic studies of the Wechsler Memory Scale were contradictory due to the confounding effects of subject age & sex. Principal component analyses with oblique rotations resulted in a 2 factor structure in 16 independent and random samples of male & females from 13-39, 40-59, 60-88

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June 1984
13 Reads

Clinical exercise trial for stroke patients.

Arch Phys Med Rehabil 1983 Aug;64(8):364-7

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August 1983
6 Reads
2.565 Impact Factor

Clinical Exercise Trial for Stroke Patients

Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

Effectiveness of traditional & facilitation approaches to therapeutic exercise in 42 stroke patients who were classified by CT scan 7 medically fit for a nonrestrictive program by neurological exam were administered the Barthel Index and manual muscle test. Lack of differences were due to heterogeneity of the stroke population, small sample size & measurements used.

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August 1983
11 Reads

Effect of Time of Day on Problem Solving Abilty and Classroom Behavior

Psychology in the Schools

43 behaviorally disturbed, learning disabled & minimally brain damaged children with a mean age of 10 years 4 months were selected from 4 suburban special education classes and given equivalent forms of Stroop Color Word Test, Kagan Matching Familiar Figures Test, Porteus Mazes & Wechsler Digit Span Test. Data collection was counterbalanced so that half were tested morning then afternoon while another half afternoon then morning. Behavior observations were recorded for 8 30 second trials during morning & following afternoon. Repeated measures multivariate & univariate analyses of variance were followed by correlational analyses. Problem solving was more efficient in morning while disruptive behavior occurred more frequently in afternoon. Students are more aroused in mornings and their attention improved increasing mental efficiency. All pupils showed more interference, off task, noncompliance & minor motor movement in afternoons. (This was mentioned in Phi Delta Kappa in 1983.)

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July 1983
11 Reads

Analysis of a Short Test Battery for Children

Journal of Clinical Psychology

Exploratory hierarchical structure of mental abilities was performed with principal component factor & hierarchical cluster analyses on the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children Revised, Peabody Individual Achievement Test, Berry Developmental Test of Visual Motor Integration & Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test with 182 children with a mean age of 10.83 years resulting in general intelligence, attention, academic achievement & perceptual eye hand coordination domains.

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July 1983
10 Reads

Vocational Interests and Personality

Journal of Occupational Psychology

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March 1983
11 Reads

Psychological Test Evaluation and Chronic Intractable Pain

Journal of Neurological and Orthopaedic Surgery

Psychological testing including the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory was performed on 54 hospitalized patients with diagnosis of chronic intractable or low back pain & were divided into 4 groups: functional low back pain, organic low back pain, mixed low back pain & organic pain at other sites than low back. Groups were compared on MMPI scales including low back (Lb) and Pichot's DOR to ascertain important differences. No significant differences existed among pain groups. Extreme caution in use of MMPI scales with low back pain patients is suggested.

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November 1982
14 Reads

Personality Factors as Predictors of Grade Point Average & Graduation from Nursing School

Educational and Psychological Measurement

From 570 female nursing students in a 3 year hospital based diploma program predictive validity coefficients were determined for ACT composite score, 10 subscales of the Edwards Personal Preference Schedule & 3 scales of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (Lie, Faking, Psychopathic Deviate) relative to criterion measure of grade point average through graduation or withdrawal. Validity coefficient of .35 for the ACT was statistically significant (p<.01). Multiple correlation coefficient of .377 was not significantly higher than zero ordered coefficient afforded by the ACT alone. Stepwise discriminant yielded parallel results of multiple regression analyses. Personality scales hold little promise as predictive variables of academic success in a 3 year diploma nursing program relative to which criterion measures such as GPA confound academic & patient care activities.

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June 1982
11 Reads

Transcutaneous electrical neurostimulation in functional pain.

Spine (Phila Pa 1976) 1981 Mar-Apr;6(2):185-8

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November 1981
3 Reads
2.297 Impact Factor

Time of Day as Related to Problem Solving Ability and Classroom Behavior

Dissertation Abstracts International

43 behaviorally disturbed, learning disabled & minimally brain damaged children with a mean age of 10 years 4 months were selected from 4 suburban special education classes and given equivalent forms of Stroop Color Word Test, Kagan Matching Familiar Figures Test, Porteus Mazes & Wechsler Digit Span Test. Data collection was counterbalanced so that half were tested morning then afternoon while another half afternoon then morning. Behavior observations were recorded for 8 30 second trials during morning & following afternoon. Problem solving was more efficient in morning while disruptive behavior occurred more frequently in afternoon. Students are more aroused in mornings and their attention improved increasing mental efficiency. (This was mentioned in Phi Delta Kappa in 1983.)

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June 1981
13 Reads

Evaluation of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation

Journal of Psychosomatic Research

Transcutaneous electrical neuro-stimulation (TENS) was applied to 15 nonsurgical low back paint patients with functional pain with 40% having significant relief (50% or better). However, TENS did not last longer than 2 months. TENS was applied to 24 postsurgical chronic intractable low back pain of psychosomatic origin with similar results.

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March 1981
11 Reads

Structure of a Psychodiagnostic Test Battery for Children

Journal of Clinical Psychology

Principal component & hierarchical cluster analyses were used on the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children Revised, Ravens Progressive Matrices, Wide Range Achievement, Wepman Auditory Discrimination, Gray Oral Reading & Huelsman Word Discrimination Tests with 213 children with a mean age of 11.17 years. Domains were general intelligence, auditory & visual learning, academic achievement & auditory discrimination.

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January 1980
11 Reads

Structure of a Neuropsychological Test Battery

Journal of Clinical Psychology

Principal component & hierarchical cluster analyses were used on the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children Revised, Ravens Progressive Matrices, Wide Range Achievement, Wepman Auditory Discrimination, Gray Oral Reading & Huelsman Word Discrimination Tests with 213 children with a mean age of 11.17 yrs. Domains were general intelligence, auditory & visual learning, academic achievement & auditory discrimination.

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January 1980
11 Reads

The effects of age and sex on the factor structure of the Wechsler Memory Scale.

Authors:
J Arbit R Zagar

J Psychol 1979 Jul;102(2d Half):185-90

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00223980.1979.9923486DOI Listing
July 1979
5 Reads

Effect of Age and Sex on the Factor Structure of the Wechsler Memory Scale

Journal of Psychology

Memory is one of the central intellectual functions characteristic of human behavior. Factor analytic studies of the Wechsler Memory Scale were contradictory due to the confounding effects of subject age & sex. Principal component analyses with oblique rotations resulted in a 2 factor structure in 16 independent and random samples of male & females from 13-39, 40-59, 60-88

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April 1979
13 Reads

Psychometrics of a Neuropsychological Test Battery

Journal of Clinical Psychology

Factor linear & hierarchical cluster nonlinear analyses were compared on a battery of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence & Memory Scale, Graham Kendal Memory for Designs & Bender Visual Motor Gestalt Tests with results discussed in the theory of verbal & performance ability & working memory.

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April 1978
10 Reads

Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in chronic back pain

6, 185-188

Spine

Transcutaneous electrical neuro-stimulation (TENS) was applied to 15 nonsurgical low back paint patients with functional pain with 40% having significant relief (50% or better). However, TENS did not last longer than 2 months. TENS was applied to 24 postsurgical chronic intractable low back pain of psychosomatic origin with similar results.

View Article
14 Reads