Publications by authors named "Robert F Aarstad"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Total laryngectomy and postoperative radiotherapy for T4 laryngeal cancer: a 14-year review.

Am J Otolaryngol 2004 Mar-Apr;25(2):88-93

Department of Radiology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA 71130, USA.

Objective: The most appropriate treatment of locally advanced carcinoma of the larynx remains to be ascertained. Management of T4 laryngeal cancer patients with postoperative radiotherapy after total laryngectomy is generally advocated and not often debated. However, the effects of this combined treatment approach are poorly documented. We reviewed the oncologic outcome and long-term survival of individuals treated by total laryngectomy and postoperative radiotherapy (TLPR) for T4 carcinoma of the larynx.

Methods: Twenty-eight patients with a pathologic diagnosis of T4 laryngeal cancer treated by TLPR during a 14-year period were studied retrospectively. Median follow-up from treatment until the end of observation was 36 months (range 6 to 123 months).

Results: The overall actuarial and disease-free survival rates at 7 years were 43% and 30%, respectively. Local recurrence, regional relapse, and distant metastasis developed in 4%, 4%, and 7% of the cases, respectively. Later esophageal stricture, dental caries, or carotid artery disease in 3 patients (11%) was successfully managed. Multivariate analysis showed patient age, bilateral true vocal cord-anterior commissure involvement by laryngeal cancer (horse-shoe lesion), and any type of treatment failure to be the most predictive variables affecting prognosis.

Conclusion: Long-term disease control and survival is achievable by TLPR with minimal late toxicity in patients with T4 carcinoma of the larynx.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjoto.2003.11.004DOI Listing
September 2004

Salvage treatment of recurrent skin cancer of the midface.

Am J Clin Oncol 2002 Dec;25(6):580-2

Department of Radiology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, Louisiana 71130, USA.

Nine patients with recurrent cutaneous cancers of the midface were treated by definitive surgery (with adjuvant radiotherapy in five individuals). The clinical courses were marked by local and regional relapses in six cases. Although the prognosis may be generally poor, aggressive therapy, as feasible, seems warranted in these patients because death was not typically rapid after reappearance of disease in several patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00000421-200212000-00010DOI Listing
December 2002

Induction chemotherapy followed by concomitant chemoradiation-induced regression of advanced cervical lymphadenopathy in head and neck cancer as a predictor of outcome.

Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2002 Jun;126(6):602-6

Department of Radiology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport 71130, USA.

Objective: We sought to determine whether induction chemotherapy followed by concomitant chemoradiation (ICCR)-induced advanced neck disease regression could predict outcome, especially the need for complete neck dissection in patients with N2-3 stage IV head and neck cancer (HNC).

Methods: A retrospective study of 339 patients evaluated for treatment of stage IV HNC during the years 1988 to 1997 revealed 36 individuals with N2-3 cervical lymphadenopathy who were treated with ICCR. Responses to treatment, patterns of failure, and survival rates were analyzed.

Results: Primary and regional tumor regressions were complete in 21 patients (58%), partial in 9 (25%), and absent in 6 (17%); the corresponding local failure rates were 5%, 44%, and 33% (P < 0.02). The regional failure rates were 24%, 89%, and 83%, respectively (P < 0.001); distant failure rates were 10%, 0%, and 0% (P > 0.99). The estimated 2-year survival rates for complete and partial/nonresponders were 57% and 20%, respectively (P < 0.02).

Conclusion: Patients with advanced regional metastases of HNC who respond completely to ICCR have an excellent chance for survival. However, such ICCR-induced complete regression of regional tumor cannot reliably predict ultimate neck disease control.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1067/mhn.2002.125606DOI Listing
June 2002
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