Publications by authors named "Rafael M Soares"

6 Publications

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Design of a multifaceted strategy based on automated text messaging in patients with recent heart failure admission.

ESC Heart Fail 2021 Sep 18. Epub 2021 Sep 18.

HCor Research Institute, R. Des. Eliseu Guilherme, 147 - Paraíso, São Paulo, 04004-030, Brazil.

Aims: To evaluate a telemonitoring strategy based on automated text messaging and telephone support after heart failure (HF) hospitalization.

Methods And Results: The MESSAGE-HF study is a prospective multicentre, randomized, nationwide trial enrolling patients from 30 clinics in all regions of Brazil. HF patients with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (<40%) and access to mobile phones are eligible after an acute decompensated HF hospitalization. Patients meeting eligibility criteria undergo an initial feasibility text messaging assessment and are randomized to usual care or telemonitoring intervention. All patients receive a HF booklet with basic information and recommendations about self-care. Patients in the intervention group receive four daily short text messages (educational and feedback) during the first 30 days of the protocol to optimize self-care; the feedback text messages from patients could trigger diuretic adjustments or a telephone call from the healthcare team. After 30 days, the frequency of text messages can be adjusted. Patients are followed up after 30, 90, and 180 days, with final status ascertained at 365 days by telephone. Our primary endpoint is the change in N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels after 180 days. Secondary endpoints include changes in NT-proBNP after 30 days; health-related quality of life, HF self-care, and knowledge scales after 30 and 180 days; and a composite outcome of HF hospitalization and cardiovascular death, adjudicated by a blinded and independent committee.

Conclusions: The MESSAGE-HF trial is evaluating an educational and self-care promotion strategy involving a simple, intensive, and tailored telemonitoring system. If proven effective, it could be applied to a broader population worldwide.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ehf2.13516DOI Listing
September 2021

Effect of Intravenous Fluid Treatment With a Balanced Solution vs 0.9% Saline Solution on Mortality in Critically Ill Patients: The BaSICS Randomized Clinical Trial.

JAMA 2021 Aug 10. Epub 2021 Aug 10.

HCor Research Institute, São Paulo, Brazil.

Importance: Intravenous fluids are used for almost all intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Clinical and laboratory studies have questioned whether specific fluid types result in improved outcomes, including mortality and acute kidney injury.

Objective: To determine the effect of a balanced solution vs saline solution (0.9% sodium chloride) on 90-day survival in critically ill patients.

Design, Setting, And Participants: Double-blind, factorial, randomized clinical trial conducted at 75 ICUs in Brazil. Patients who were admitted to the ICU with at least 1 risk factor for worse outcomes, who required at least 1 fluid expansion, and who were expected to remain in the ICU for more than 24 hours were randomized between May 29, 2017, and March 2, 2020; follow-up concluded on October 29, 2020. Patients were randomized to 2 different fluid types (a balanced solution vs saline solution reported in this article) and 2 different infusion rates (reported separately).

Interventions: Patients were randomly assigned 1:1 to receive either a balanced solution (n = 5522) or 0.9% saline solution (n = 5530) for all intravenous fluids.

Main Outcomes And Measures: The primary outcome was 90-day survival.

Results: Among 11 052 patients who were randomized, 10 520 (95.2%) were available for the analysis (mean age, 61.1 [SD, 17] years; 44.2% were women). There was no significant interaction between the 2 interventions (fluid type and infusion speed; P = .98). Planned surgical admissions represented 48.4% of all patients. Of all the patients, 60.6% had hypotension or vasopressor use and 44.3% required mechanical ventilation at enrollment. Patients in both groups received a median of 1.5 L of fluid during the first day after enrollment. By day 90, 1381 of 5230 patients (26.4%) assigned to a balanced solution died vs 1439 of 5290 patients (27.2%) assigned to saline solution (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.97 [95% CI, 0.90-1.05]; P = .47). There were no unexpected treatment-related severe adverse events in either group.

Conclusion And Relevance: Among critically ill patients requiring fluid challenges, use of a balanced solution compared with 0.9% saline solution did not significantly reduce 90-day mortality. The findings do not support the use of this balanced solution.

Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02875873.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jama.2021.11684DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8356144PMC
August 2021

Implementation of a Brazilian Cardioprotective Nutritional (BALANCE) Program for improvement on quality of diet and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events: A randomized, multicenter trial.

Am Heart J 2019 09 21;215:187-197. Epub 2019 Jun 21.

Hospital Universitário Pedro Ernesto, Rio de Janeiro-RJ, Brazil.

Background: Appropriate dietary recommendations represent a key part of secondary prevention in cardiovascular disease (CVD). We evaluated the effectiveness of the implementation of a nutritional program on quality of diet, cardiovascular events, and death in patients with established CVD.

Methods: In this open-label, multicenter trial conducted in 35 sites in Brazil, we randomly assigned (1:1) patients aged 45 years or older to receive either the BALANCE Program (experimental group) or conventional nutrition advice (control group). The BALANCE Program included a unique nutritional education strategy to implement recommendations from guidelines, adapted to the use of affordable and regional foods. Adherence to diet was evaluated by the modified Alternative Healthy Eating Index. The primary end point was a composite of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular death, cardiac arrest, myocardial infarction, stroke, myocardial revascularization, amputation, or hospitalization for unstable angina. Secondary end points included biochemical and anthropometric data, and blood pressure levels.

Results: From March 5, 2013, to Abril 7, 2015, a total of 2534 eligible patients were randomly assigned to either the BALANCE Program group (n = 1,266) or the control group (n = 1,268) and were followed up for a median of 3.5 years. In total, 235 (9.3%) participants had been lost to follow-up. After 3 years of follow-up, mean modified Alternative Healthy Eating Index (scale 0-70) was only slightly higher in the BALANCE group versus the control group (26.2 ± 8.4 vs 24.7 ± 8.6, P < .01), mainly due to a 0.5-serving/d greater intake of fruits and of vegetables in the BALANCE group. Primary end point events occurred in 236 participants (18.8%) in the BALANCE group and in 207 participants (16.4%) in the control group (hazard ratio, 1.15; 95% CI 0.95-1.38; P = .15). Secondary end points did not differ between groups after follow-up.

Conclusions: The BALANCE Program only slightly improved adherence to a healthy diet in patients with established CVD and had no significant effect on the incidence of cardiovascular events or death.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ahj.2019.06.010DOI Listing
September 2019

Atorvastatin for high-risk statin-naïve patients undergoing noncardiac surgery: The Lowering the Risk of Operative Complications Using Atorvastatin Loading Dose (LOAD) randomized trial.

Am Heart J 2017 Feb 9;184:88-96. Epub 2016 Nov 9.

Brazilian Clinical Research Institute (BCRI), São Paulo, Brazil; Duke Clinical Research Institute, Durham, NC.

Preliminary evidence suggests that statins may prevent major perioperative vascular complications.

Methods: We randomized 648 statin-naïve patients who were scheduled for noncardiac surgery and were at risk for a major vascular complication. Patients were randomized to a loading dose of atorvastatin or placebo (80 mg anytime within 18hours before surgery), followed by a maintenance dose of 40 mg (or placebo), started at least 12hours after the surgery, and then 40 mg/d (or placebo) for 7days. The primary outcome was a composite of all-cause mortality, nonfatal myocardial injury after noncardiac surgery, and stroke at 30days.

Results: The primary outcome was observed in 54 (16.6%) of 326 patients in the atorvastatin group and 59 (18.7%) of 316 patients in the placebo group (hazard ratio [HR] 0.87, 95% CI 0.60-1.26, P=.46). No significant effect was observed on the 30-day secondary outcomes of all-cause mortality (4.3% vs 4.1%, respectively; HR 1.14, 95% CI 0.53-2.47, P=.74), nonfatal myocardial infarction (3.4% vs 4.4%, respectively; HR 0.76, 95% CI 0.35-1.68, P=.50), myocardial injury after noncardiac surgery (13.2% vs 16.5%; HR 0.79, 95% CI 0.53-1.19, P=.26), and stroke (0.9% vs 0%, P=.25).

Conclusion: In contrast to the prior observational and trial data, the LOAD trial has neutral results and did not demonstrate a reduction in major cardiovascular complications after a short-term perioperative course of statin in statin-naïve patients undergoing noncardiac surgery. We demonstrated, however, that a large multicenter blinded perioperative statin trial for high-risk statin-naïve patients is feasible and should be done to definitely establish the efficacy and safety of statin in this patient population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ahj.2016.11.001DOI Listing
February 2017

Nutrition, mental health and violence: from pregnancy to postpartum Cohort of women attending primary care units in Southern Brazil--ECCAGE study.

BMC Psychiatry 2010 Aug 31;10:66. Epub 2010 Aug 31.

Graduate Program in Epidemiology, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Rua Ramiro Barcelos, Porto Alegre/RS, Brazil.

Background: Woman's nutritional status, before and during pregnancy, is a strong determinant of health outcomes in the mother and newborn. Gestational weight gain and postpartum weight retention increases risk of overweight or obesity in the future and they depend on the pregestational nutritional status and on food consumption and eating behavior during pregnancy. Eating behavior during pregnancy may be the cause or consequence of mood changes during pregnancy, especially depression, which increases likelihood of postpartum depression. In Brazil, a study carried out in the immediate postpartum period found that one in three women experienced some type of violence during pregnancy. Violence and depression are strongly associated and both exposures during pregnancy are associated with increased maternal stress and subsequent harm to the infant. The main objectives of this study are: to identify food intake and eating behaviors patterns; to estimate the prevalence of common mental disorders and the experience of violence during and after pregnancy; and to estimate the association between these exposures and infant's health and development.

Methods/design: This is a cohort study of 780 pregnant women receiving care in 18 primary care units in two cities in Southern Brazil. Pregnant women were first evaluated between the 16th and 36th week of pregnancy at a prenatal visit. Follow-up included immediate postpartum assessment and around the fifth month postpartum. Information was obtained on sociodemographic characteristics, living circumstances, food intake, eating behaviors, mental health and exposure to violence, and on infant's development and anthropometrics measurements.

Discussion: This project will bring relevant information for a better understanding of the relationship between exposures during pregnancy and how they might affect child development, which can be useful for a better planning of health actions aiming to enhance available resources in primary health care.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-244X-10-66DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2939583PMC
August 2010
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