Publications by authors named "Pekka T Jaatinen"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

How does a shortage of physicians impact on the job satisfaction of health centre staff?

Scand J Prim Health Care 2008 ;26(4):248-50

Department of Family Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Turku, Sweden.

Objective: The aim was to determine how a shortage of physicians at Finnish health centres has affected the job satisfaction of the entire staff.

Methods: A questionnaire was posted to 2848 employees working with patients at health centres in the Finnish provinces of Satakunta and Varsinais-Suomi. The information concerning the shortage of physicians at health centres was taken from research undertaken by the Finnish Medical Association in October 2003. The health centres were divided into four groups according to the severity of the shortage.

Results: The questionnaire was returned by 1447 employees. The staff at health centres with the most severe shortage of physicians were less satisfied with the management of the organization. Employees at health centres with a minor shortage of physicians were more satisfied with the quality of services in their operational unit. The shortage of physicians had no impact on staff satisfaction regarding the operation of their work unit, the strain of dealing with issues within their work environment, feelings of stress, the strain of working under pressure that they experienced, or interest in finding a new job.

Conclusion: The majority of healthcare employees are satisfied and motivated in their work. The shortage of physicians has only a slightly negative impact on their satisfaction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02813430802497117DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3406643PMC
December 2008

Waist circumference home measurement--a device to find out patients in cardiovascular risk.

Eur J Public Health 2009 Jan 16;19(1):95-9. Epub 2008 Oct 16.

Central Satakunta Health Federation of Municipalities, Harjavalta, Finland.

Background: New strategies are needed to prevent the global epidemic of diabetes and subsequent rise in cardiovascular diseases. We describe a community-based, two-stage screening strategy using home waist circumference measurement and a risk factor questionnaire as a primary screening tool.

Methods: We mailed a tape for measurement of waist and a risk factor questionnaire to every inhabitant aged 45-70 years living in the rural town of Harjavalta in Finland. Thereafter we performed an oral glucose tolerance test, anthropometric variables and blood pressure of subjects having at least one risk factor for type 2 diabetes or cardiovascular disease. People with previously known diabetes or vascular disease were excluded.

Results: Seventy-three percent (2085/2856) of the invited inhabitants participated, and 84% of the respondents had at least one pre-specified risk factor. Waist circumference >or=80 cm in women and >or=94 cm in men (n = 1168), positive metabolic syndrome criteria of the International Diabetes Federation (n = 681) or the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score questionnaire >or=12 points (n = 697) identified 95, 92 and 63% of the new cases of type 2 diabetes and 84, 75 or 62% of pre-diabetes, respectively.

Conclusion: The International Diabetes Federation criteria for elevated waist circumference are very sensitive but lack specificity in diagnosing glucose disorders. The criteria for metabolic syndrome and the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score questionnaire are more efficient tools for the selection of patients for further risk stratification in general practise.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/ckn090DOI Listing
January 2009

Common training for students at the academic health centre.

J Interprof Care 2007 Dec;21(6):687-9

Satakunta Hospital District, Pori Health Service Office, Pori, Finland.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13561820701412533DOI Listing
December 2007

Networking family counselling services. Developing psychosocial support for school children.

J Interprof Care 2005 Jun;19(3):294-5

Satakunta Hospital District, Satakunta, Finland.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13561820500138644DOI Listing
June 2005

Teleconsultations: who uses them and how?

J Telemed Telecare 2002 ;8(6):319-24

Primary Health-Care Centre, Northwest Satakunta, Finland.

A literature survey was carried out to identify papers describing teleconsulting applications. From 1259 potentially relevant articles identified through Medline, 128 articles were selected for review. The majority of these had been published in the Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare (50 articles, or 39%). We analysed different user groups, equipment and implementation issues, and the type of connections. In 101 studies (79%) the teleconsultations were between doctors, in 11 they were between patient and doctor, in seven between patient and nurse, and in nine between nurse and doctor. Studies of consultations between patients and health-care professionals were thus quite rare. Surgery was the most common specialty in which teleconsultation was described. The teleconsultations were realtime or mainly realtime in 72% of articles. In 39% of studies the primary focus was on videoconferencing. The most common means of connection was by ISDN digital lines (38%). There were very few mentions of how to ensure data protection or to maintain patient confidentiality. We conclude that, for the majority of teleconsultation needs, asynchronous communication is the most flexible and cost-effective approach. Realtime videoconferencing can be justified only in particular circumstances.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1258/135763302320939194DOI Listing
April 2003

Teleconsultation as a replacement for referral to an outpatient clinic.

J Telemed Telecare 2002 ;8(2):102-6

Primary Health-Care Centre in Northwest Satakunta, Noormarkku, Finland.

We conducted a randomized case control study of referrals from a primary care centre in Finland. All the consultations and referrals from seven general practitioners (GPs) dealt with by internists and surgeons at Satakunta Central Hospital in Pori and geriatricians at Satalinna Hospital in Harjavalta over five months were included. For patients in the control group, a conventional referral letter was sent to the hospital outpatient clinic. For patients in the intervention group, the GPs had to decide whether they wanted an electronic consultation with the hospital or wanted to refer the patient (i.e. to transfer responsibility for treatment). Communication with the hospital specialist was then via a secure Web-based system. Ninety-three patients consented to participate in the study. None refused, although there were 15 non-attenders. Satisfaction data were collected from questionnaires completed by the patients and doctors. All the patients treated by teleconsultation said that they wanted the same procedure in future and 63% of the control group said they would prefer a teleconsultation next time. The doctors quickly learned to exploit the telemedicine model successfully. The responsibility for treatment was maintained in the health centre in 52% of cases using teleconsultation, without any visit to hospital being required. The GPs and the hospital doctors agreed on the follow-up treatment. Telereferral increased the possibility of the GP maintaining responsibility for the treatment. The reduced number of hospital visits in the telemedicine model should produce significant cost savings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1258/1357633021937550DOI Listing
June 2002
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