Publications by authors named "Patricia Hinton Walker"

12 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Battlefield acupuncture: Opening the door for acupuncture in Department of Defense/Veteran's Administration health care.

Nurs Outlook 2016 Sep-Oct;64(5):491-8. Epub 2016 Jul 20.

Defense Veterans Center for Pain Management (DVCIPM), Rockville, MD.

Battlefield acupuncture is a unique auricular acupuncture procedure which is being used in a number of military medical facilities throughout the Department of Defense (DoD). It has been used with anecdotal published positive impact with warriors experiencing polytrauma, post-traumatic stress disorder, and traumatic brain injury. It has also been effectively used to treat warriors with muscle and back pain from carrying heavy combat equipment in austere environments. This article highlights the history within the DoD related to the need for nonpharmacologic/opioid pain management across the continuum of care from combat situations, during evacuation, and throughout recovery and rehabilitation. The article describes the history of auricular acupuncture and details implementation procedures. Training is necessary and partially funded through DoD and Veteran's Administration (VA) internal Joint Incentive Funds grants between the DoD and the VA for multidisciplinary teams as part of a larger initiative related to the recommendations from the DoD Army Surgeon General's Pain Management Task Force. Finally, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences School of Medicine and Graduate School of Nursing faculty members present how this interdisciplinary training is currently being integrated into both schools for physicians and advanced practice nurses at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. Current and future research challenges and progress related to the use of acupuncture are also presented.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.outlook.2016.07.008DOI Listing
May 2017

Faculty and organizational characteristics associated with informatics/health information technology adoption in DNP programs.

J Prof Nurs 2014 Jul-Aug;30(4):292-9. Epub 2014 Jan 28.

Vice President for Policy and Strategic Initiatives and Professor of Nursing, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland; Senior Advisor, TIGER Initiative Foundation.

Nursing informatics/health information technology are key components of graduate nursing education and an accreditation requirement, yet little is known about the extent to which doctor of nursing practice (DNP) curricula include these content domains. The purpose of this descriptive study was to elicit perceptions of DNP program directors relative to (a) whether and how the American Association of Colleges of Nursing's (AACN's) Essential IV standard has been met in their DNP programs; (b) whether the Technology Informatics Guiding Educational Reform Initiative Foundation's Phase II competencies have been integrated in their programs; and (c) the faculty and organizational characteristics associated with the adoption of the AACN's Essential IV. In 2011, an electronic survey was sent to all 138 DNP program directors identified on the AACN Web site with an 81.2% response rate. Findings include variation in whether and how programs have integrated informatics/health information technology content, a lack of informatics-certified and/or master's-prepared faculty, and a perceived lack of faculty awareness of informatics curricular guidelines. DNP program director and dean awareness and support of faculty informatics education, use of informatics competency guidelines, and national policy and stimulus funding support are recommended to promote curricular inclusion and the engagement of nurses in strong informatics practices.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.profnurs.2014.01.004DOI Listing
July 2016

The TIGER continues to ROAR: launching the virtual learning environment!

Nurs Adm Q 2013 Jul-Sep;37(3):266-8

Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland 20814, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAQ.0b013e318295f573DOI Listing
April 2015

The TIGER initiative: a call to accept and pass the baton.

Nurs Econ 2010 Sep-Oct;28(5):352-5

Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD, USA.

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January 2011

Patient safety climate in primary care: age matters.

J Patient Saf 2009 Mar;5(1):23-8

Center for Quality and Safety, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Objective: Safety climate, as a measurement in time of safety culture using a survey instrument, has been explored in inpatient units and among hospitals. Differences have been reported among professional groups in these venues. This study sought to determine if comparable differences exist among professional groups in ambulatory care settings.

Setting: Four US Air Force ambulatory care facilities (clinics) from the Midwestern United States.

Methods: The Safety Attitudes Questionnaire was selected as the research tool because of its published utilization in inpatient venues, its sound psychometrics (Cronbach alpha, 0.74-0.93), and its ambulatory care version.

Results: All 328 available primary care staff from 4 clinics was surveyed yielding 213 responses for a response rate of 65%. There were no significant differences among the professional groups on the total patient safety score or on 5 of the 6 subscales. There were, however, significant differences on total safety scores based on age, not professional group, with staff members younger than 31 years scoring lower on the overall safety score (mean, 64.8; P < 0.001), as compared with the 32- to 41-year age group (mean, 74.3) and those 42- to 63-year age group (mean, 73.8). The youngest age group also had the lowest scores on the subscales of teamwork climate, safety climate, perception of management, and job satisfaction (all subscales P < 0.03). These differences persisted after controlling for professional group.

Conclusions: Growing attention has been given to the demographic groups known in the popular press as Generation Xers and Nexters, but not within the context of enhancing patient safety. Efforts that address the information, training, and job satisfaction needs of these specific age groups have the potential to strengthen health care teams and contribute to a more positive safety climate.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PTS.0b013e318199d4bfDOI Listing
March 2009

Hospital-acquired infections as patient safety indicators.

Annu Rev Nurs Res 2006 ;24:75-99

CNS Nursing Department, NIH Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

Transmission of infection in the hospital has been identified as a patient safety problem adversely affecting patients, visitors, and health care workers. Prevention of infection should not be limited to the hospital epidemiology staff but also must involve the entire multidisciplinary team, including nurses. This chapter reviews the literature related to patient safety of nursing-authored studies of infection control in the hospital. The review indicated that there were key areas of research interest including drug resistance; hand hygiene products, procedures, and surveillance; preoperative skin preparations; health care worker transmission of infection; common procedures associated with an increased risk of transmission; and organizational issues.
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November 2006

The intersection of patient safety and nursing research.

Annu Rev Nurs Res 2006 ;24:3-15

Graduate School of Nursing, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

The individual and collective discussions of the patient safety issue in the United States have mounted from a low roar to a deafening din in the past 10 years. In this chapter the authors (1) discuss the context of patient safety over the past decade and the federal response to the problem, (2) briefly present Reason's theory of human error, which frames much of the safety research, and (3) provide a glossary of terms.
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November 2006

Research issues in preparedness for mass casualty events, disaster, war, and terrorism.

Nurs Clin North Am 2005 Sep;40(3):551-64, x

Graduate School of Nursing, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD 20814, USA.

This article provides a perspective on the types of research questions that might be explored and strategies used in relation to disaster,terrorism, and mass casualty events. Research is addressed in the context of three areas of focus: issues related to the health care provider; issues affecting the patient, individual, family, and community; and issues related to the health care system.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnur.2005.04.008DOI Listing
September 2005

Collaboration: leadership in a global technological environment.

Online J Issues Nurs 2005 Jan 31;10(1). Epub 2005 Jan 31.

Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD, USA.

Although collaboration is not a new idea, new opportunities for collaboration exist in this 21st century global-knowledge and information-driven economy. Technology has reduced time and space while enhancing communication, thereby opening the possibilities of exploring new boundaries in the area of interdisciplinary collaboration. The goal of this article is to assist leaders in changing the language of organizations so that new technologies can enhance collaboration. A systematic approach for leaders to use in assisting assist persons, groups, and organizations in integrating new technologies into their organizations locally and globally is offered, along with a summary of new, and several established, collaboration techniques.
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January 2005

A day in the lives of APNs in the U.S.

Nurse Pract 2003 Oct;28(10):32-9

School of Nursing, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00006205-200310000-00012DOI Listing
October 2003

Outcomes and effectiveness research: capacity building for nurse researchers at the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

Outcomes Manag 2002 Oct-Dec;6(4):146-51

Center for Outcomes and Effectiveness Research, AHRQ, 6010 Executive Boulevard, Suite 300, Rockville, MD 20852, USA.

Several of AHRQ's priority areas including disease prevention, health promotion, primary care, quality of care, service delivery, and patient safety are particularly relevant to nurse researchers. With much national attention focused on nursing-related issues such as staff shortages, training, mandatory overtime, working conditions, and autonomy, it is mandatory that nursing research be conducted to inform healthcare delivery and policy. Nurses also need to contribute to the health services literature so that an even balance of discipline perspective is represented. AHRQ's mandate is represented by the slogan "quality research for quality health care." Although our understanding has expanded of contributors to and determinants of evidence-based practice and the relationship between clinical care and improved outcomes, we have much to learn. Appreciating how and which components of nursing care influence patient outcomes represents an essential area of research in need of development. While clarifying nursing contributions to improved outcomes is not the sole purview of nurse researchers, it is plausible to assume that a clinical background in nursing combined with strong methodological skills can help policy makers and health system leaders understand how nurses can most effectively contribute to outcomes and quality improvement. AHRQ is clearly interested in capacity building of researchers from all relevant disciplines. Nurses, the largest provider of healthcare, need to build capacity and develop a much stronger presence in the health services research community of scholars.
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November 2002
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