Publications by authors named "Pascale Duff"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Trans10,cis15 18:2 Isolated from Beef Fat Does Not Have the Same Anti-Adipogenic Properties as Trans10,cis12-18:2 in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes.

Lipids 2016 11 3;51(11):1231-1239. Epub 2016 Sep 3.

Lacombe Research and Development Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lacombe, Alberta, Canada.

During ruminal biohydrogenation of α-linolenic acid, a non-conjugated non-methylene interrupted dienoic acid is formed containing a t10 double bond, namely t10,c15-18:2. The present study was designed to examine whether t10,c15-18:2 would exert similar anti-adipogenic effects compared to t10,c12-18:2 in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated with 35 or 70 µM of LNA, t10,c12-18:2, t10,c15-18:2, or bovine serum albumin (BSA) vehicle control for 120 h. Cellular triacylglycerol and protein were quantified using commercial colorimetric kits. Cells were analyzed for fatty acid composition and gene expression using gas chromatography and quantitative PCR, respectively. Trans10,cis12-18:2 decreased (P < 0.05) the adipocyte triacylglycerol (TAG) content, which was mainly related to a reduction in saturated fatty acids (SFA; e.g., 16:0 and 15:0) and cis monounsaturated fatty acids (c-MUFA; e.g., c9-16:1 and c9-18:1). Trans10,cis12 also decreased (P < 0.05) the expression of genes related to fatty acid synthesis (ACACA, FASN), delta-9 desaturation (SCD1), fatty acid elongation (ELOVL5), and fatty acid uptake (LPL) and upregulated (P < 0.05) the expression of the rate-liming enzyme involved in fatty acid β-oxidation (CPT1). In contrast, LNA and t10,c15-18:2 did not affect the gene expression and cellular content of the TAG, SFA, c-MUFA, or SCD1 indices in adipocytes. Our findings suggest that t10,c15-18:2, despite having structural similarity to t10,c12-18:2 (presence of a trans-10 double bond), does not exert anti-adipogenic effects in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11745-016-4192-3DOI Listing
November 2016

A 10-18:1 enriched fraction from beef fed a barley grain-based diet induces lipogenic gene expression and reduces viability of HepG2 cells.

Biochem Biophys Rep 2016 Sep 27;7:84-90. Epub 2016 May 27.

Lacombe Research and Development Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lacombe, Alberta, Canada.

Beef fat is a natural source of fatty acids, and is typically enriched with either 10-18:1 or 11-18:1. Little is known about the bioactivity of individual -18:1 isomers, and the present study compared the effects of 9-18:1, ()9-18:1 and -18:1 fractions isolated from beef fat enriched with either 10-18:1 (HT10) or 11-18:1 (HT11). All 18:1 isomers resulted in reduced human liver (HepG2) cell viability relative to control. Both 9-18:1 and HT11were the least toxic, 9-18:1had dose response increased toxicity, and HT10 had the greatest toxicity (<0.05). Incorporation of 18:1 isomers was 1.8-2.5 fold greater in triacylglycerol (TG) than phospholipids (PL), whereas Δ9 desaturation products were selectively incorporated into PL. Culturing HepG2 cells with 9-18:1 and HT10 increased (<0.05) the Δ9 desaturation index (9-16:1/16:0) compared to other fatty acid treatments. HT10 and 9-18:1 also increased expression of lipogenic genes (FAS, SCD1, HMGCR and SREBP2) compared to control (<0.05), whereas 9-18:1 and HT11 did not affect the expression of these genes. Our results suggest effects of HT11 and 9-18:1 were similar to BSA control, whereas HT10 and -9 18:1 (i.e. the predominant fatty acid isomer found in partially hydrogenated vegetable oils) were more cytotoxic and led to greater expression of lipogenic genes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbrep.2016.05.018DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5613299PMC
September 2016

Pigs fed camelina meal increase hepatic gene expression of cytochrome 8b1, aldehyde dehydrogenase, and thiosulfate transferase.

J Anim Sci Biotechnol 2014 Jan 3;5(1). Epub 2014 Jan 3.

AAFC-Lacombe, 6000 C&E Trail, Lacombe, AB, Canada T4L 1 W1.

Camelina sativa is an oil seed crop which can be grown on marginal lands. Camelina seed oil is rich in omega-3 fatty acids (>35%) and γ-tocopherol but is also high in erucic acid and glucosinolates. Camelina meal, is the by-product after the oil has been extracted. Camelina meal was fed to 28 d old weaned pigs at 3.7% and 7.4% until age 56 d. The camelina meal supplements in the soy based diets, improved feed efficiency but also significantly increased the liver weights. Gene expression analyses of the livers, using intra-species microarrays, identified increased expression of phase 1 and phase 2 drug metabolism enzymes. The porcine versions of the enzymes were confirmed by real time PCR. Cytochrome 8b1 (CYP8B1), aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (Aldh2), and thiosulfate transferase (TST) were all significantly stimulated. Collectively, these genes implicate the camelina glucosinolate metabolite, methyl-sulfinyldecyl isothiocyanate, as the main xeniobiotic, causing increased hepatic metabolism and increased liver weight.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/2049-1891-5-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3901634PMC
January 2014

Fortification of pork loins with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and its effect on flavour.

J Anim Sci Biotechnol 2013 Nov 20;4(1):46. Epub 2013 Nov 20.

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lacombe Research Centre, 6000 C&E Trail, Lacombe T4L 1 W1AB, Canada.

Pork is traditionally low in docosahexanoic acid (DHA, C22:6n-3) and deficient in omega-3 fats for a balanced human diet. DHA as triglycerides was commercially prepared from the microalgae Schizochytrium and injected into fresh pork loins. Treatments of a mixed brine control (CON), 3.1% sunflower oil in mixed brine (SF) and a 3.1% DHA oil in mixed brine (DHA) were injected into pork loins at 10 mL/100 g and grilled at 205°C. After cooking, the CON and SF pork loins contained 0.03 to 0.05 mg DHA/g of pork and the DHA injected loins contained approximately 1.46 mg DHA/g. This also changed the fatty acid profile of omega-6: omega-3 from, 5 to 1 in the CON pork, to a ratio of 1.7 to 1 in DHA pork. The appearance, odor, oxidation rates and sensory taste, as judged by a trained panel, determined the DHA injected meat to be, 'slightly desirable' and gave lower 'off flavour' scores, relative to the CON and SF injected pork. Pork can be fortified with DHA oil to 146 mg/100 g serving, which would meet half the recommended daily omega 3 fatty acid requirements for adult humans and would be desirable in taste.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/2049-1891-4-46DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4222727PMC
November 2013

Production of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) enriched bacon.

J Agric Food Chem 2010 Jan;58(1):465-72

Lacombe Research Center, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lacombe, Alberta, Canada T4L 1W1.

North American consumers interested in improving their health through diet perceive red meat as a source of too much saturated and unhealthy fat in the diet. The purpose of this trial was to produce bacon enriched with the long-chain omega-3 fatty acid, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). In this 25 day study, pigs were fed a standard finisher diet of canola, pea, corn, and barley, mixed with DHA, added in the form of alga biomass. Bacon content of DHA was increased to 97 mg/100 g when 1 g of DHA was added to a kilogram of feed. The pigs fed the highest diet level of alga biomass, containing 0.29% DHA, produced bacon with approximately 3.4 mg of DHA/g and 1.2% of the fat as omega-3 fatty acids. Feed to gain was significantly improved, and carcass quality was unaffected. However, problems of off-odors and off-flavors were reported in the bacon from the taste panel survey. Polyunsaturated fat and potential unsaturated fat oxidation as indicated by malonaldehyde levels were significantly higher in the pigs fed the higher concentrations of DHA.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf9028078DOI Listing
January 2010
-->