Publications by authors named "Natnita Mattawanon"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Comparison of HIV-Positive Incidence Among Transgender Women and Men Who Have Sex with Men at Stand-Alone and Mobile Voluntary Counseling and Testing Facilities in Chiang Mai Province, Thailand.

AIDS Patient Care STDS 2021 04;35(4):116-125

Department of Statistics, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand.

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is still a major cause of death in Thais and new cases of infection are still emerging among the key population comprising men who have sex with men (MSM), sex workers and their clients, and transgender women (TGW) and people who inject drugs. The objective of this study was to compare the incidence of HIV infection between MSM and TGW who were tested at stand-alone and mobile HIV voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) centers and to identify factors associated with HIV-positive individuals from the two services. We conducted an observational study using MSM and TGW individuals with unknown HIV status from the databases at a stand-alone center and a mobile VCT belonging to the MPlus in Chiang Mai province, Thailand. Factors associated with HIV-positive status were identified using logistic regression model. HIV VCT data were obtained for 6971 individuals at both MPlus center and mobile care unit. Among 3033 and 3938 clients tested at each facility, respectively, 168 (5.6%) and 101 (2.6%) clients were HIV positive. Individuals tested at the stand-alone centers were at a 1.91-fold higher risk of being HIV positive compared with those tested at the mobile VCT unit. Individuals who were 20-24 or >24 years old, sex workers, or sexually transmitted infection positive were more likely to be HIV positive. Our results show the beneficial effect of mobile HIV VCT facilities that enable testing of more of the at-risk population. Developing mobile VCT activities that attract a particular target population is needed to be able to reach the 90-90-90 goals. This study was approved by the Ethics Committee of the Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University (0BG-2562-06418).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/apc.2020.0258DOI Listing
April 2021

Fertility preservation options in transgender people: A review.

Rev Endocr Metab Disord 2018 09;19(3):231-242

Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Lipids, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA.

Gender affirming procedures adversely affect the reproductive potential of transgender people. Thus, fertility preservation options should be discussed with all transpeople before medical and surgical transition. In transwomen, semen cryopreservation is typically straightforward and widely available at fertility centers. The optimal number of vials frozen depends on their reproductive goals and treatment options, therefore a consultation with a fertility specialist is optimal. Experimental techniques including spermatogonium stem cells (SSC) and testicular tissue preservation are technologies currently under development in prepubertal individuals but are not yet clinically available. In transmen, embryo and/or oocyte cryopreservation is currently the best option for fertility preservation. Embryo cryopreservation requires fertilization of the transman's oocytes with a donor or partner's sperm prior to cryopreservation, but this limits his future options for fertilizing the eggs with another partner or donor. Oocyte cryopreservation offers transmen the opportunity to preserve their fertility without committing to a male partner or sperm donor at the time of cryopreservation. Both techniques however require at least a two-week treatment course, egg retrieval under sedation and considerable cost. Ovarian tissue cryopreservation is a promising experimental method that may be performed at the same time as gender affirming surgery but is offered in only a limited amount of centers worldwide. In select places, this method may be considered for prepubertal children, adolescents, and adults when ovarian stimulation is not possible. Novel methods such as in-vitro activation of primordial follicles, in vitro maturation of immature oocytes and artificial gametes are under development and may hold promise for the future.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11154-018-9462-3DOI Listing
September 2018

Short-Term Isoflavone Intervention in the Treatment of Severe Vasomotor Symptoms after Surgical Menopause: A Case Report and Literature Review.

Case Rep Obstet Gynecol 2015 29;2015:962740. Epub 2015 Oct 29.

Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand.

Isoflavones are soy phytoestrogens that potentially exert various favorable effects in postmenopausal women, for example, alleviating vasomotor episodes, attenuating bone loss, and stimulating vaginal epithelial maturation. There has, however, been lack of consensus regarding those therapeutic effects. Most clinical studies of isoflavones have been conducted with women who had undergone natural menopause, but not those who had undergone surgical menopause. This study reports on a 51-year-old woman who presented with severe vasomotor episodes after undergoing a hysterectomy and a bilateral oophorectomy due to hypermenorrhea secondary to myoma uteri. She refused hormone therapy due to fear of adverse drug reactions so was treated with oral soy isoflavones (two capsules twice daily, equivalent to at least 100 mg daily dose) for 8 weeks. The number and severity of hot flushes and her menopause-specific quality of life dramatically improved from baseline values. The serum bone resorption marker (beta C-telopeptide) decreased markedly, while vaginal epithelial maturation improved slightly, suggesting the potential of isoflavones in attenuating bone loss and stimulating vaginal maturation. The intervention did not adversely affect the hormonal profile (FSH, LH, and estradiol) and liver or renal functions. Thus, isoflavones could be an option for women experiencing severe vasomotor episodes after surgical menopause.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/962740DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4641951PMC
November 2015