Publications by authors named "Natalia E Fares-Otero"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Letter to the Editor: Targeting adverse stress-related consequences of the COVID-19 crisis in individuals with psychotic disorders and childhood maltreatment.

J Psychiatr Res 2021 06 30;138:453-455. Epub 2021 Apr 30.

Department of Psychiatry, Biomedical Research Institute, University Hospital 12 de Octubre (imas12), Faculty of Medicine, Complutense University of Madrid (UCM), Madrid, Spain; CIBERSAM (Biomedical Research Networking Centre in Mental Health), Spain.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2021.04.031DOI Listing
June 2021

How does neighbourhood socio-economic status affect the interrelationships between functioning dimensions in first episode of psychosis? A network analysis approach.

Health Place 2021 May 18;69:102555. Epub 2021 Mar 18.

Department of Psychiatry, Hospital Universitario de La Princesa, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Del Hospital Universitario de La Princesa, IIS Princesa, CIBERSAM, School of Medicine, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain. Electronic address:

The links between psychosis and socio-economic disadvantage have been widely studied. No previous study has analysed the interrelationships and mutual influences between functioning dimensions in first episode of psychosis (FEP) according to their neighbourhood household income, using a multidimensional and transdiagnostic perspective. 170 patients and 129 controls, participants in an observational study (AGES-CM), comprised the study sample. The WHO Disability Assessment Schedule (WHODAS 2.0) was used to assess functioning, whereas participants' postcodes were used to obtain the average household income for each neighbourhood, collected by the Spanish National Statistics Institute (INE). Network analyses were conducted with the aim of defining the interrelationships between the different dimensions of functioning according to the neighbourhood household income. Our results show that lower neighbourhood socioeconomic level is associated with lower functioning in patients with FEP. Moreover, our findings suggest that "household responsibilities" plays a central role in the disability of patients who live in low-income neighbourhoods, whereas "dealing with strangers" is the most important node in the network of patients who live in high-income neighbourhoods. These results could help to personalize treatments, by allowing the identification of potential functioning areas to be prioritized in the treatment of FEP according to the patient's neighbourhood characteristics.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.healthplace.2021.102555DOI Listing
May 2021

The interplay between functioning problems and symptoms in first episode of psychosis: An approach from network analysis.

J Psychiatr Res 2021 04 15;136:265-273. Epub 2021 Feb 15.

Department of Psychiatry, Hospital Universitario de La Princesa, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria del Hospital Universitario de La Princesa, IIS Princesa, CIBERSAM, School of Medicine, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain. Electronic address:

The relationship between psychotic symptoms and global measures of functioning has been widely studied. No previous study has assessed so far the interplay between specific clinical symptoms and particular areas of functioning in first-episode psychosis (FEP) using network analysis methods. A total of 191 patients with FEP (age 24.45 ± 6.28 years, 64.9% male) participating in an observational and longitudinal study (AGES-CM) comprised the study sample. Functioning problems were assessed with the WHO Disability Assessment Schedule (WHODAS), whereas the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) was used to assess symptom severity. Network analysis were conducted with the aim of analysing the patterns of relationships between the different dimensions of functioning and PANSS symptoms and factors at baseline. According to our results, the most important nodes were "conceptual disorganization", "emotional withdrawal", "lack of spontaneity and flow of conversation", "delusions", "unusual thought content", "dealing with strangers" and "poor rapport". Our findings suggest that these symptoms and functioning dimensions should be prioritized in the clinical assessment and management of patients with FEP. These areas may also become targets of future early intervention strategies, so as to improve quality of life in this population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2021.02.024DOI Listing
April 2021

Gender-based violence during COVID-19 outbreak in Spain.

Psychol Med 2020 Dec 7:1-2. Epub 2020 Dec 7.

CIBERSAM (Biomedical Research Networking Centre in Mental Health), Spain.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0033291720005024DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7804072PMC
December 2020

COVID-19: The need for screening for domestic violence and related neurocognitive problems.

J Psychiatr Res 2020 11 23;130:433-434. Epub 2020 Aug 23.

Department of Psychiatry, Biomedical Research Institute, University Hospital 12 de Octubre (imas12), Madrid, Spain; CIBERSAM (Biomedical Research Networking Centre in Mental Health), Spain; Faculty of Medicine, Complutense University of Madrid (UCM), Madrid, Spain.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2020.08.015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7443252PMC
November 2020

Are you angry at me? Negative interpretations of neutral facial expressions are linked to child maltreatment but not to posttraumatic stress disorder.

Eur J Psychotraumatol 2019 11;10(1):1682929. Epub 2019 Nov 11.

Department of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry and Psychosomatic Medicine, University Hospital Zurich, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.

: Individuals with a high prevalence of child maltreatment, e.g. those with borderline personality disorder, tend to see neutral facial expressions as negative. : Our aim was to assess whether this bias is present in individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and whether it is linked to child maltreatment. : Thirty-nine PTSD participants, 44 traumatized and 35 non-traumatized healthy controls watched 300 one-second movies showing 30 neutral and 270 emotional facial expressions, and indicated whether they interpreted each as a neutral or as one of nine emotional expressions. : PTSD individuals did not perform differently than the two control groups in the recognition and interpretation of neutral facial expressions ('s < .300). Higher levels of childhood sexual and emotional abuse, and physical neglect were linked to more interpretations of neutral facial expressions as contempt ( < .043), and (for sexual abuse and physical neglect) to more interpretations of neutral facial expressions as anger (p's < .014). Comparisons of statistical model fits suggested that childhood sexual abuse was the most relevant predictor of recognition accuracy in our sample. Alexithymia, state dissociation, interpersonal trauma, and number of experienced trauma types were not associated with deficits in the interpretation of neutral expressions. : Child maltreatment, especially sexual abuse, may shape the interpretation of neutral facial expressions. Future research should explore whether the observed biases extend to real-life situations. If so, therapists might improve the therapeutic relationship with patients with a history of child maltreatment by paying more attention to their own non-verbal communication and their patients' responses to it. Furthermore, similarly to individuals with high depressive and high social anxiety symptoms, facial expression recognition training might counteract negativity bias in individuals with a history of childhood (sexual and emotional) abuse, and (physical) neglect.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/20008198.2019.1682929DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6853207PMC
November 2019