Publications by authors named "Martine Grosos Aabye"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Diabetes is associated with lower tuberculosis antigen-specific interferon gamma release in Tanzanian tuberculosis patients and non-tuberculosis controls.

Scand J Infect Dis 2014 May 12;46(5):384-91. Epub 2014 Mar 12.

Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen , Denmark.

Background: Diabetes is increasingly common in TB endemic regions and plays a role as a possible risk factor for increased progression from latent TB infection (LTBI) to active TB disease. Although the pathophysiological mechanisms are not fully understood, the immune system is weakened in diabetes patients and therefore the validity of interferon gamma release assays (IGRA) may be compromised. The aim of the present study was to assess the association between diabetes and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) antigen-specific interferon gamma (IFN-γ) release in a TB endemic area among culture-confirmed TB patients and non-TB controls.

Methods: Culture-confirmed pulmonary TB patients (n = 187) and healthy non-TB neighbourhood controls (n = 190) from Mwanza, Tanzania were tested for the presence of circulating T cells recognizing Mtb antigens using an IGRA. The diabetes status of all participants was assessed using a standard oral glucose tolerance test. The impact of diabetes on the performance of the IGRA was estimated using robust linear and logistic regression.

Results: Compared to normal glucose tolerance, diabetes was associated with reduced levels of Mtb-specific IFN-γ. Increasing levels of fasting blood glucose (B - 0.3, 95% confidence interval - 0.6 to - 0.03, p = 0.033) was negatively associated with IFN-γ. Although TB patients had higher specific and lower unspecific mitogen IFN-γ responses compared to non-TB controls, the association between diabetes and IFN-γ did not depend on TB status.

Conclusion: Diabetes is associated with lower levels of Mtb antigen-specific IFN-γ, and the validity of IFN- γ tests for LTBI may be questionable in individuals with diabetes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00365548.2014.885657DOI Listing
May 2014

[Research training is inadequate among future medical doctors].

Ugeskr Laeger 2012 Oct;174(43):2624-7

PUFF, c/o Studenterhuset Panum, Nørre Allé 8, Copenhagen.

This questionnaire survey investigated interest and activity in pregraduate research among 643 medical students at the Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences at the University of Copenhagen. We find, that although the students show great interest and motivation for research, very few have actual research experience. The students described suboptimal research training, lack of tutoring and facilitation as well as of career counselling. Also, conditions for pregraduate research activities are unequal among the faculties of health sciences in Denmark.
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October 2012

The role of diabetes co-morbidity for tuberculosis treatment outcomes: a prospective cohort study from Mwanza, Tanzania.

BMC Infect Dis 2012 Jul 27;12:165. Epub 2012 Jul 27.

Department of Human Nutrition, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark.

Background: Due to the association between diabetes and pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), diabetes may threaten the control of TB. In a prospective cohort study nested in a nutrition trial, we investigated the role of diabetes on changes in anthropometry, grip strength, and clinical parameters over a five months follow-up period.

Methods: Among pulmonary TB patients with known diabetes status, we assessed anthropometry and clinical parameters (e.g. haemoglobin) at baseline and after two and five months of TB treatment. A linear mixed-effects model (repeated measurements) was used to investigate the role of diabetes during recovery.

Results: Of 1205 TB patients, the mean (standard deviation) age was 36.6 (13.0) years, 40.9% were females, 48.9% were HIV co-infected, and 16.3% had diabetes. TB patients with diabetes co-morbidity experienced a lower weight gain at two (1.3 kg, CI95% 0.5; 2.0, p = 0.001) and five months (1.0 kg, CI95% 0.3; 1.7, p = 0.007). Similarly, the increase in the level of haemoglobin was lower among TB patients with diabetes co-morbidity after two (Δ 0.6 g/dL, CI95% 0.3; 0.9 p < 0.001) and five months (Δ 0.5 g/dL, CI95% 0.2; 0.9 p = 0.004) of TB treatment, respectively.

Conclusion: TB patients initiating TB treatment with diabetes co-morbidity experience delayed recovery of body mass and haemoglobin, which are important for the functional recovery from disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2334-12-165DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3462148PMC
July 2012

Diabetes is a risk factor for pulmonary tuberculosis: a case-control study from Mwanza, Tanzania.

PLoS One 2011 30;6(8):e24215. Epub 2011 Aug 30.

Department of Human Nutrition, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark.

Background: Diabetes and TB are associated, and diabetes is increasingly common in low-income countries where tuberculosis (TB) is highly endemic. However, the role of diabetes for TB has not been assessed in populations where HIV is prevalent.

Methods: A case-control study was conducted in an urban population in Tanzania among culture-confirmed pulmonary TB patients and non-TB neighbourhood controls. Participants were tested for diabetes according to WHO guidelines and serum concentrations of acute phase reactants were measured. The association between diabetes and TB, and the role of HIV as an effect modifier, were examined using logistic regression. Since blood glucose levels increase during the acute phase response, we adjusted for elevated serum acute phase reactants.

Results: Among 803 cases and 350 controls the mean (SD) age was 34.8 (11.9) and 33.8 (12.0) years, and the prevalence of diabetes was 16.7% (95% CI: 14.2; 19.4) and 9.4% (6.6; 13.0), respectively. Diabetes was associated with TB (OR 2.2, 95% CI: 1.5; 3.4, p<0.001). However, the association depended on HIV status (interaction, p = 0.01) due to a stronger association among HIV uninfected (OR 4.2, 95% CI: 1.5; 11.6, p = 0.01) compared to HIV infected (OR 0.1, 95% CI: 0.01; 1.8, p = 0.13) after adjusting for age, sex, demographic factors and elevated serum acute phase reactants.

Conclusion: Diabetes is a risk factor for TB in HIV uninfected, whereas the association in HIV infected patients needs further study. The increasing diabetes prevalence may be a threat to TB control.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0024215PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3166171PMC
December 2011
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