Publications by authors named "Margaretha Morsink"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Effects of electrically conductive nano-biomaterials on regulating cardiomyocyte behavior for cardiac repair and regeneration.

Acta Biomater 2021 Nov 21. Epub 2021 Nov 21.

Division of Engineering in Medicine, Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Electronic address:

Myocardial infarction (MI) represents one of the most prevalent cardiovascular diseases, with a highly relevant and impactful role in public health. Despite the therapeutic advances of the last decades, MI still begets extensive death rates around the world. The pathophysiology of the disease correlates with cardiomyocyte necrosis, caused by an imbalance in the demand of oxygen to cardiac tissues, resulting from obstruction of the coronary flow. To alleviate the severe effects of MI, the use of various biomaterials exhibit vast potential in cardiac repair and regeneration, acting as native extracellular matrices. These hydrogels have been combined with nano sized or functional materials which possess unique electrical, mechanical, and topographical properties that play important roles in regulating phenotypes and the contractile function of cardiomyocytes even in adverse microenvironments. These nano-biomaterials' differential properties have led to substantial healing on in vivo cardiac injury models by promoting fibrotic scar reduction, hemodynamic function preservation, and benign cardiac remodeling. In this review, we discuss the interplay of the unique physical properties of electrically conductive nano-biomaterials, are able to manipulate the phenotypes and the electrophysiological behavior of cardiomyocytes in vitro, and can enhance heart regeneration in vivo. Consequently, the understanding of the decisive roles of the nano-biomaterials discussed in this review could be useful for designing novel nano-biomaterials in future research for cardiac tissue engineering and regeneration. STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE: This study introduced and deciphered the understanding of the role of multimodal cues in recent advances of electrically conductive nano-biomaterials on cardiac tissue engineering. Compared with other review papers, which mainly describe these studies based on various types of electrically conductive nano-biomaterials, in this review paper we mainly discussed the interplay of the unique physical properties (electrical conductivity, mechanical properties, and topography) of electrically conductive nano-biomaterials, which would allow them to manipulate phenotypes and the electrophysiological behaviour of cardiomyocytes in vitro and to enhance heart regeneration in vivo. Consequently, understanding the decisive roles of the nano-biomaterials discussed in the review could help design novel nano-biomaterials in future research for cardiac tissue engineering and regeneration.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.actbio.2021.11.022DOI Listing
November 2021

Biofabrication of natural hydrogels for cardiac, neural, and bone Tissue engineering Applications.

Bioact Mater 2021 Nov 15;6(11):3904-3923. Epub 2021 Apr 15.

LIBio, Université de Lorraine, Nancy, F-54000, France.

Natural hydrogels are one of the most promising biomaterials for tissue engineering applications, due to their biocompatibility, biodegradability, and extracellular matrix mimicking ability. To surpass the limitations of conventional fabrication techniques and to recapitulate the complex architecture of native tissue structure, natural hydrogels are being constructed using novel biofabrication strategies, such as textile techniques and three-dimensional bioprinting. These innovative techniques play an enormous role in the development of advanced scaffolds for various tissue engineering applications. The progress, advantages, and shortcomings of the emerging biofabrication techniques are highlighted in this review. Additionally, the novel applications of biofabricated natural hydrogels in cardiac, neural, and bone tissue engineering are discussed as well.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bioactmat.2021.03.040DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8080408PMC
November 2021

Synthesis and characterization of C2C12-laden gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA) from marine and mammalian sources.

Int J Biol Macromol 2021 Jul 7;183:918-926. Epub 2021 May 7.

LIBio, Université de Lorraine, F-54000 Nancy, France. Electronic address:

Gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA) is widely used for tissue engineering applications as an extracellular matrix (ECM) mimicking scaffold due to its cost-effectiveness, ease of synthesis, and high biocompatibility. GelMA is widely synthesized from porcine skin gelatin, which labors under clinical, religious, and economical restrictions. In order to overcome these limitations, GelMA can be produced from fish skin gelatin, which is eco-friendly as well. Here, we present a comparative study of the physicochemical (structural, thermal, water uptake, swelling, rheological, and mechanical) and biological (cell viability, proliferation, and spreading) properties of porcine and fish skin GelMA with low and high methacrylation degrees, before and after crosslinking, to check whether fish skin can replace porcine skin as the source of GelMA. Porcine and fish skin GelMA presented similar structural, thermal, and water uptake properties prior to crosslinking. However, subsequent to crosslinking, fish skin GelMA hydrogels exhibited a higher mass swelling ratio and a lower elastic and compressive Young's moduli than porcine skin GelMA hydrogels of similar methacrylation level. Both types of GelMA hydrogels showed great biocompatibility toward encapsulated mouse myoblast cells (C2C12), however, improved cell spreading was observed in fish skin GelMA hydrogels, and cell proliferation was only induced in low methacrylated GelMA. These results suggest that fish skin GelMA is a promising substitute for porcine skin GelMA for biomedical applications and that low methacrylated fish skin GelMA can be used as a potential scaffold for skeletal muscle tissue engineering.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2021.05.040DOI Listing
July 2021

Immune Organs and Immune Cells on a Chip: An Overview of Biomedical Applications.

Micromachines (Basel) 2020 Sep 12;11(9). Epub 2020 Sep 12.

Division of Engineering in Medicine, Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.

Understanding the immune system is of great importance for the development of drugs and the design of medical implants. Traditionally, two-dimensional static cultures have been used to investigate the immune system in vitro, while animal models have been used to study the immune system's function and behavior in vivo. However, these conventional models do not fully emulate the complexity of the human immune system or the human in vivo microenvironment. Consequently, many promising preclinical findings have not been reproduced in human clinical trials. Organ-on-a-chip platforms can provide a solution to bridge this gap by offering human micro-(patho)physiological systems in which the immune system can be studied. This review provides an overview of the existing immune-organs-on-a-chip platforms, with a special emphasis on interorgan communication. In addition, future challenges to develop a comprehensive immune system-on-chip model are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/mi11090849DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7570325PMC
September 2020

New Trends in Drug Delivery Systems for Veterinary Applications.

Pharm Nanotechnol 2021 ;9(1):15-25

University of Tiradentes (Unit), Av. Murilo Dantas, 300, 49010- 390, Aracaju, Brazil.

Background: The veterinary pharmaceutical industry has shown significant growth in recent decades. Several factors contribute to this increase as the demand for the improvement of the quality of life of both domestic and wild animals, together with the need to improve the quality, productivity, and safety of foodstuffs of animal origin.

Methods: The goal of this work was to identify the most suitable medicines for animals that focus on drug delivery routes as those for humans, although they may have different devices, such as collars and ear tags.

Results: Recent advances in drug delivery systems for veterinary use are discussed, both from academic research and the global market. The administration routes commonly used for veterinary medicines are also explored, while special attention is given to the latest technological trends to improve the drug performance, reducing the number of doses, animal stress, and side effects.

Conclusion: Drug delivery system in veterinary decreased the number of doses, side effects, and animal stress that are a small fraction of the benefits of veterinary drug delivery systems and represent a significant increase in profit for the industry; also, it demands investments in research regarding the quality, safety, and efficacy of the drug and the drug delivery systems.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/2211738508666200613214548DOI Listing
October 2021
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