Publications by authors named "Marcelina Strzępek-Gomółka"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Schrenk from Kazakhstan-Natural Source of Bioactive Compounds with Cosmetic Significance.

Molecules 2021 Apr 28;26(9). Epub 2021 Apr 28.

Independent Laboratory of Natural Products Chemistry, Department of Pharmacognosy, Medical University of Lublin, 1 Chodzki Str., 20-093 Lublin, Poland.

Plants belonging to the genus are known for their high content of bioactive molecules and broad spectrum of healing and cosmetic activities.  Schrenk is a wild-type species abundant in the mountainous regions of Kazakhstan. The phytochemical composition as well as the bioactivity of  extracts have not been fully investigated to date. In this study, various parts of plant, collected in Almaty region, Kazakhstan, were used to prepare five hydroalcoholic extracts (R1-R5). The extracts were compared for the content of phytochemicals and selected biological activities, which are important for the potential cosmetic application of . Extract R3, prepared from flower buds, showed the most significant antioxidant and tyrosinase inhibitory potential, decreasing the monophenolase and diphenolase activities of tyrosinase. Extract R3 showed also collagenase inhibitory activity and cytotoxicity against human melanoma cells A375, being less cytotoxic for noncancerous skin keratinocytes HaCaT. Analysis of fractions E and F, obtained from R3 extracts, revealed that quercetin, kaempferol, rutin, and their derivatives are more likely responsible for the tyrosinase inhibitory properties of extracts.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/molecules26092578DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8124526PMC
April 2021

Species as Sources of Active Phytochemicals for Dermatological and Cosmetic Applications.

Oxid Med Cell Longev 2021 25;2021:6643827. Epub 2021 Mar 25.

Department of Pharmacognosy, Medical University of Lublin, Chodźki 1, 20-093, Poland.

spp. is well known for its broad range of applications and long history of use in traditional medicine around the world. Health benefits of extracts result from the multitude of secondary metabolites identified in the plants from this genus that include flavonoids, phenolic acids, terpenes, guaianolides, phytosterols, fatty acids, and organic acids. The properties of several extracts meet also the expectations of a vividly developing cosmetic market. An increasing number of studies on the dermatological properties of spp. are observed in the recent years, with L. being the most studied and used representative of the genus. There is strong scientific evidence showing that also other yarrow species might be rich sources of effective cosmetic ingredients, with skin calming and rejuvenating properties, wound healing activity, and anti-inflammatory potential. Several extracts and isolated compounds were also shown to display significant tyrosinase inhibitory, antioxidant, and antimicrobial properties and thus are interesting candidates for active ingredients of medications and cosmetic products protecting the skin from the harmful impact of environmental stressors. The aim of this review is to collect the current information on the composition and cosmeceutical significance of different species.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2021/6643827DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8018854PMC
May 2021

Identification of Mushroom and Murine Tyrosinase Inhibitors from Afan. Extract.

Molecules 2021 Feb 11;26(4). Epub 2021 Feb 11.

Chair and Department of Pharmacognosy, Medical University in Lublin, Chodźki 1, 20-093 Lublin, Poland.

Growing scientific evidence indicates that is a valuable source of active ingredients with potential cosmetic applications. However, the data on its composition and pharmacological properties are still insufficient. This study aims to optimize the extraction procedure of the plant material, evaluate its phytochemical composition, and compare anti-tyrosinase potential of extracts obtained by various methods. In order to identify compounds responsible for the tyrosinase inhibitory activity of , the most active anti-tyrosinase extract was fractionated by column chromatography. The fractions were examined for their skin lightening potential by mushroom and murine tyrosinase inhibitory assays and melanin release assay. HPLC-ESI-Q-TOF-MS/MS analysis of the total extract revealed the presence of several phenolic acids, flavonoids, flavonoid glucosides, and carboxylic acid. Among them, fraxetin-8--glucoside, quercetin--glucopyranose, schaftoside/isoschaftoside, gmelinin B, 1,3-dicaffeoylquinic acid (1,3-DCQA), and ferulic acid were found in the fractions with the highest skin lightening potential. Based on obtained qualitative and quantitative analysis of the fractions, it was assumed that the caffeoylquinic acid derivatives and dicaffeoylquinic acid derivatives are more likely responsible for mushroom tyrosinase inhibitory activity of extracts and fractions. Ferulic acid was proposed as the most active murine tyrosinase inhibitor, responsible also for the reduced melanin release from B16F10 murine melanoma cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/molecules26040964DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7917799PMC
February 2021

L. and Afan. Hydroglycolic Extracts-Bioactive Ingredients for Cosmetic Use.

Molecules 2020 Jul 24;25(15). Epub 2020 Jul 24.

Department of Pharmacognosy, Medical University of Lublin, Chodźki 1, 20-093 Lublin, Poland.

Studies on hydroglycolic (HG) extracts of (AB)-a less investigated representative of the genus-were performed to determine their potential for cosmetic applications compared to the well-known (AM). Three types of water:polyethylene glycol extracts (1:1, 4:1, 6:1 /) were obtained from both species and analyzed for their composition by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-Q-TOF-MS) and assayed for their biological activities. The study led to the identification of 11 metabolites from different natural product classes with the highest share corresponding to 5-caffeoylquinic acid, axillarin, coumaroylquinic acid isomers and 3-caffeoylquinic acid. The highest antiradical capacity in DPPH and ABTS scavenging assays was shown for HG 4:1 of AB and AM extracts. HG 1:1 extracts from both species inhibited monophenolase and diphenolase activity of tyrosinase, whereas AB HG 4:1 extract showed significant monophenolase inhibition. The highest sun protection factor (SPF) was determined for AM HG 4:1 extract, equal to 14.04 ± 0.17. The AB extracts were cytotoxic for both human keratinocytes HaCaT and A375 melanoma, however HG 1:1 and 4:1 extracts were more cytotoxic for cancer than for noncancerous cells. In conclusion, AB HG 1:1 and 4:1 extracts display significant potential as active cosmetic ingredients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/molecules25153368DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7436264PMC
July 2020