Publications by authors named "Manya J Hendriks"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Swiss neonatal caregivers express diverging views on parental involvement in shared decision-making for extremely premature infants.

Acta Paediatr 2021 Mar 3. Epub 2021 Mar 3.

Department of Neonatology, University Hospital Zurich, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.

Aim: Due to scarce available national data, this study assessed current attitudes of neonatal caregivers regarding decisions on life-sustaining interventions, and their views on parents' aptitude to express their infant's best interest in shared decision-making.

Methods: Self-administered web-based quantitative empirical survey. All 552 experienced neonatal physicians and nurses from all Swiss NICUs were eligible.

Results: There was a high degree of agreement between physicians and nurses (response rates 79% and 70%, respectively) that the ability for social interactions was a minimal criterion for an acceptable quality of life. A majority stated that the parents' interests are as important as the child's best interest in shared decision-making. Only a minority considered the parents as the best judges of what is their child's best interest. Significant differences in attitudes and values emerged between neonatal physicians and nurses. The language area was very strongly associated with the attitudes of neonatal caregivers.

Conclusion: Despite clear legal requirements and societal expectations for shared decision-making, survey respondents demonstrated a gap between their expressed commitment to shared decision-making and their view on parental aptitude to formulate their infant's best interest. National guidelines need to address these barriers to shared decision-making to promote a more uniform nationwide practice.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/apa.15828DOI Listing
March 2021

Correction to: Decision-making at the limit of viability: differing perceptions and opinions between neonatal physicians and nurses.

BMC Pediatr 2020 Jan 31;20(1):47. Epub 2020 Jan 31.

Department of Neonatology, University Hospital Zurich, Frauenklinikstrasse 10, 8091, Zürich, Switzerland.

After publication of our article [1] it was brought to our attention that we did not have permission to reproduce the questionnaire in Additional File 1.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12887-019-1890-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6993516PMC
January 2020

Correction to: decision-making at the limit of viability: differing perceptions and opinions between neonatal physicians and nurses.

BMC Pediatr 2018 07 9;18(1):226. Epub 2018 Jul 9.

Department of Neonatology, University Hospital Zurich, Frauenklinikstrasse 10, 8091, Zürich, Switzerland.

After publication of the original article [1], the corresponding author noticed the given names and family names of the members included in the Swiss Neonatal End-of-Life Study Group were incorrectly reverted.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12887-018-1204-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6038305PMC
July 2018

Decision-making at the limit of viability: differing perceptions and opinions between neonatal physicians and nurses.

BMC Pediatr 2018 02 22;18(1):81. Epub 2018 Feb 22.

Department of Neonatology, University Hospital Zurich, Frauenklinikstrasse 10, 8091, Zürich, Switzerland.

Background: In the last 20 years, the chances for intact survival for extremely preterm infants have increased in high income countries. Decisions about withholding or withdrawing intensive care remain a major challenge in infants born at the limits of viability. Shared decision-making regarding these fragile infants between health care professionals and parents has become the preferred model today. However, there is an ongoing ethical debate on how decisions regarding life-sustaining treatment should be reached and who should have the final word when health care professionals and parents do not agree. We designed a survey among neonatologists and neonatal nurses to analyze practices, difficulties and parental involvement in end-of-life decisions for extremely preterm infants.

Methods: All 552 physicians and nurses with at least 12 months work experience in level III neonatal intensive care units (NICU) in Switzerland were invited to participate in an online survey with 50 questions. Differences between neonatologists and NICU nurses and between language regions were explored.

Results: Ninety six of 121 (79%) physicians and 302 of 431(70%) nurses completed the online questionnaire. The following difficulties with end-of-life decision-making were reported more frequently by nurses than physicians: insufficient time for decision-making, legal constraints and lack of consistent unit policies. Nurses also mentioned a lack of solidarity in our society and shortage of services for disabled more often than physicians. In the context of limiting intensive care in selected circumstances, nurses considered withholding tube feedings and respiratory support less acceptable than physicians. Nurses were more reluctant to give parents full authority to decide on the course of action for their infant. In contrast to professional category (nurse or physician), language region, professional experience and religion had little influence if any on the answers given.

Conclusions: Physicians and nurses differ in many aspects of how and by whom end-of-life decisions should be made in extremely preterm infants. The divergencies between nurses and physicians may be due to differences in ethics education, varying focus in patient care and direct exposure to the patients. Acknowledging these differences is important to avoid potential conflicts within the neonatal team but also with parents in the process of end-of-life decision-making in preterm infants born at the limits of viability.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12887-018-1040-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5822553PMC
February 2018

In Response.

J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs 2018 05 15;47(3):416-417. Epub 2018 Feb 15.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jogn.2018.02.002DOI Listing
May 2018

Fragile lives with fragile rights: Justice for babies born at the limit of viability.

Bioethics 2018 03 25;32(3):205-214. Epub 2018 Jan 25.

There is an inconsistency in the ways that doctors make clinical decisions regarding the treatment of babies born extremely prematurely. Many experts now recommend that clinical decisions about the treatment of such babies be individualized and consider many different factors. Nevertheless, many policies and practices throughout Europe and North America still appear to base decisions on gestational age alone or on gestational age as the primary factor that determines whether doctors recommend or even offer life-sustaining neonatal intensive care treatment. These policies are well intentioned. They aim to guide doctors and parents to make decisions that are best for the baby. That is an ethically appropriate goal. But in relying so heavily on gestational age, such policies may actually do the babies a disservice by denying some babies treatment that might be beneficial and lead to intact survival. In this paper, we argue that such policies are unjust to premature babies and ought to be abolished. In their place, we propose individualized treatment decisions for premature babies. This would treat premature babies as we treat all other patients, with clinical decisions based on an individualized estimation of likelihood that treatment would be beneficial.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bioe.12428DOI Listing
March 2018

Sources of distress for physicians and nurses working in Swiss neonatal intensive care units.

Swiss Med Wkly 2017 3;147:w14477. Epub 2017 Aug 3.

Department of Neonatology, Perinatal Centre, University Hospital Zurich, University of Zurich, Switzerland.

Background: Medical personnel working in intensive care often face difficult ethical dilemmas. These may represent important sources of distress and may lead to a diminished self-perceived quality of care and eventually to burnout.

Aims Of The Study: The aim of this study was to identify work-related sources of distress and to assess symptoms of burnout among physicians and nurses working in Swiss neonatal intensive care units (NICUs).

Methods: In summer 2015, we conducted an anonymous online survey comprising 140 questions about difficult ethical decisions concerning extremely preterm infants. Of these 140 questions, 12 questions related to sources of distress and 10 to burnout. All physicians and nurses (n = 552) working in the nine NICUs in Switzerland were invited to participate.

Results: The response rate was 72% (398). The aspects of work most commonly identified as sources of distress were: lack of regular staff meetings, lack of time for routine discussion of difficult cases, lack of psychological support for the NICU staff and families, and missing transmission of important information within the caregiver team. Differences between physicians' and nurses' perceptions became apparent: for example, nurses were more dissatisfied with the quality of the decision-making process. Different perceptions were also noted between staff in the German- and French- speaking parts of Switzerland: for example, respondents from the French part rated lack of regular staff meetings as being more problematic. On the other hand, personnel in the French part were more satisfied with their accomplishments in the job. On average, low levels of burnout symptoms were revealed, and only 6% of respondents answered that the work-related burden often affected their private life.

Conclusions: Perceived sources of distress in Swiss NICUs were similar to those in ICU studies. Despite rare symptoms of burnout, communication measures such as regular staff meetings and psychological support to prevent distress were clearly requested.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4414/smw.2017.14477DOI Listing
June 2018

"You Can Only Give Warmth to Your Baby When It's Too Late": Parents' Bonding With Their Extremely Preterm and Dying Child.

Qual Health Res 2017 Dec 30;27(14):2100-2115. Epub 2017 Jul 30.

1 University Hospital of Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland.

This study on end-of-life decisions in extremely preterm babies shows that the parents under study experience a multitude of stressors due to the immediate separation after birth, the alienating setting of the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), the physical distance to the child, medical uncertainties, and upcoming decisions. Even though they are considered to be parents (assigned parenthood), they cannot act as primary caregivers. Instead, they depend on professional instructions for access and care. Embodied parenthood can be experienced only at the end-of-life, that is, during the dying trajectory and after the child's death. Professionally supporting parents during this compressed process (from assigned and distant to embodied parenthood) contributes fundamentally to their perception of being a family and supports their mourning. This calls for the further establishment of palliative and bereavement care concepts in neonatology.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1049732317721476DOI Listing
December 2017

End-of-Life Decision Making for Parents of Extremely Preterm Infants.

J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs 2017 Sep - Oct;46(5):727-736. Epub 2017 Jul 24.

Objective: To explore parental attitudes and values in the end-of-life decision-making process of extremely preterm infants (gestational age < 28 weeks).

Design: Hermeneutically oriented qualitative research design with in-depth interviews.

Setting: Level III NICU in Switzerland.

Participants: Purposive sample of seven couples, five mothers, and one father (20 parents).

Methods: Qualitative content analysis was used to categorize and interpret themes from parents' narratives.

Results: Parents described factors that affected the decision-making process in satisfactory or unsatisfactory ways. Transparent information, empathy, and honesty enhanced communication between parents and the health care team. Lack of transparent information and continuous support decreased satisfaction. The level of involvement in decisions differed by setting. Most parents made decisions regarding lung maturation and/or initiation of care in the delivery room. Parent participation in the NICU was experienced differently. Contrary to the hospital's ethical model, few parents recalled being involved in the decision-making process. Some parents experienced a dissociative state of mind that hindered their involvement, whereas others felt actively involved.

Conclusions: Our results suggest the need for careful and continuous professional evaluation of parents' wishes about involvement in the decision-making process, along with descriptions of medical facts and treatment options. A lack of attentive listening and dialogue may cause paternalistic decision trajectories.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jogn.2017.06.006DOI Listing
May 2018

Exploring societal solidarity in the context of extreme prematurity.

Swiss Med Wkly 2017 7;147:w14418. Epub 2017 Mar 7.

Institute of Biomedical Ethics and History of Medicine, University of Zurich, Switzerland.

Question: Extreme prematurity can result in long-term disabilities. Its impact on society is often not taken into account and deemed controversial. Our study examined attitudes of the Swiss population regarding extreme prematurity and people's perspectives regarding the question of solidarity with disabled people.

Methods: We conducted a nationwide representative anonymous telephone survey with 1210 Swiss residents aged 18 years or older. We asked how people estimate their own personal solidarity, the solidarity of their social environment and the solidarity across the country with disabled persons. Spearman's correlation calculations were used to assess if a correlation exists between solidarity and setting financial limits to intensive care and between solidarity and withholding neonatal intensive care.

Results: According to 36.0% of the respondents intensive medical care should not be withheld from extremely preterm infants, even if their chances for an acceptable quality of life were poor. For 28.8%, intensive care should be withheld from these infants, and 26.9% held an intermediate position depending on the situation. A total of 31.5% were against setting a financial limit to treatment of extremely preterm newborns with an uncertain future quality of life, 34.2% were in favour and 26.9% were deliberating. A majority (88.8%) considered their solidarity toward disabled people as substantial; the solidarity of their personal environment and of the society at large was estimated as high by 79.1% and 48.6%, respectively.

Conclusions: The Swiss population expressed a high level of solidarity which may alleviate some pressure on parents and health care providers in the decision-making process in neonatal intensive care units. In addition, there was no relationship between solidarity and people's willingness to pay for the care or withholding treatment of extremely preterm babies.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4414/smw.2017.14418DOI Listing
October 2017

Attitudes towards decisions about extremely premature infants differed between Swiss linguistic regions in population-based study.

Acta Paediatr 2017 Mar 22;106(3):423-429. Epub 2016 Dec 22.

Department of Neonatology, Perinatal Centre, University Hospital Zurich, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.

Aim: Studies have provided insights into the different attitudes and values of healthcare professionals and parents towards extreme prematurity. This study explored societal attitudes and values in Switzerland with regard to this patient group.

Methods: A nationwide trilingual telephone survey was conducted in the French-, German- and Italian-speaking regions of Switzerland to explore the general population's attitudes and values with regard to extreme prematurity. Swiss residents of 18 years or older were recruited from the official telephone registry using quota sampling and a logistic regression model assessed the influence of socio-demographic factors on end-of-life decision-making.

Results: Of the 5112 people contacted, 1210 (23.7%) participated. Of these 5% were the parents of a premature infant and 26% knew parents with a premature infant. Most participants (77.8%) highlighted their strong preference for shared decision-making, and 64.6% said that if there was dissent then the parents should have the final word. Overall, our logistic regression model showed that regional differences were the most significant factors influencing decision-making.

Conclusion: The majority of the Swiss population clearly favoured shared decision-making. The context of sociocultural demographics, especially the linguistic region in which the decision-making took place, strongly influenced attitudes towards extreme prematurity and decision-making.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/apa.13680DOI Listing
March 2017