Publications by authors named "Manisha Sengupta"

26 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Characteristics of Residential Care Communities by Percentage of Resident Population Diagnosed With Dementia: United States, 2016.

Natl Health Stat Report 2020 12(148):1-8

Introduction-Increasingly, residential care communities (RCCs) are becoming a source of care for older adults with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. Nationally in 2016, 41.9% of RCC residents were diagnosed with dementia. This report examines selected characteristics of RCCs and characteristics of their residents by the prevalence of Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. Methods-Data in this report are from the RCC survey component of the 2016 wave of the biennial National Study of Long-Term Care Providers (NSLTCP), conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics. RCCs were grouped into three categories indicating prevalence of Alzheimer's disease and other dementias in their communities: RCCs with less than 25% of their residents diagnosed with dementia, RCCs with 25%-75% of their residents diagnosed with dementia, and RCCs with more than 75% of their residents diagnosed with dementia. RCC characteristics included bed size, metropolitan statistical area location, provision of mental health services, and staff hours per resident day. Resident characteristics included selected conditions and need for assistance with activities of daily living. Results-Approximately one-quarter of RCCs (25.3%) had more than 75% of their residents diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. More RCCs with over 75% of their residents diagnosed with dementia were in metropolitan statistical areas (90.5%) compared with RCCs with 25%-75% (81.4%) and less than 25% of their residents diagnosed with dementia (76.4%). Aide and activities staff hours per resident day were higher in RCCs with more than 75% of their residents diagnosed with dementia compared with the other dementia prevalence categories. The prevalence of depression and the need for assistance with activities of daily living were higher in RCCs with more than 75% of the residents diagnosed with dementia compared with the other dementia prevalence categories.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
December 2020

Variations Between Adult Day Services Centers in the United States by the Racial and Ethnic Case-Mix of Center Participants.

J Appl Gerontol 2020 Jul 2:733464820934996. Epub 2020 Jul 2.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Hyattsville, MD, USA.

This is the first nationally representative study to identify differences between adult day services centers, a unique home- and community-based service, by racial/ethnic case-mix: Centers were classified as having a majority of participants who were Hispanic, non-Hispanic Black, or non-Hispanic other race/ethnicities and non-Hispanic White. The associations between racial/ethnic case-mix and geographic and operational characteristics of centers and health and functioning needs of participants were assessed using multivariate regression analyses, using the 2014 National Study of Long-term Care Providers' survey of 2,432 centers. Half of all adult day centers predominantly served racial/ethnic minorities, which were more likely to be for-profit, had lower percentages of self-pay revenue, more commonly provided transportation services, and had higher percentages of participants with diabetes, compared with predominantly non-Hispanic White centers. Findings show differences by racial/ethnic case-mix, which are important when considering the long-term care needs of a diverse population of older adults.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0733464820934996DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7775908PMC
July 2020

National Center for Health Statistics Guidelines for Analysis of Trends.

Vital Health Stat 2 2018 Apr(179):1-71

Many reports present analyses of trends over time based on multiple years of data from National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) surveys and the National Vital Statistics System (NVSS). Trend analyses of NCHS data involve analytic choices that can lead to different conclusions about the trends. This report discusses issues that should be considered when conducting a time trend analysis using NCHS data and presents guidelines for making trend analysis choices. Trend analysis issues discussed include: choosing the observed time points to include in the analysis, considerations for survey data and vital records data (record level and aggregated), a general approach for conducting trend analyses, assorted other analytic issues, and joinpoint regression. This report provides 12 guidelines for trend analyses, examples of analyses using NCHS survey and vital records data, statistical details for some analysis issues, and SAS and SUDAAN code for specification of joinpoint regression models. Several an lytic choices must be made during the course of a trend analysis, and the choices made can affect the results. This report highlights the strengths and limitations of different choices and presents guidelines for making some of these choices. While this report focuses on time trend analyses, the issues discussed and guidelines presented are applicable to trend analyses involving other ordinal and interval variables.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
April 2018

Variation in Residential Care Community Resident Characteristics, by Size of Community: United States, 2016.

NCHS Data Brief 2018 02(299):1-8

Residents of residential care communities are persons who cannot live independently but generally do not require the skilled care provided by nursing homes. On any given day in 2016, an estimated 811,500 residents were in residential care communities (1,2). As the population ages, the numbers in residential care communities will likely increase, creating a sizeable group within the long-term care population. This report presents national estimates of selected characteristics of residential care community residents in 2016 and compares them by community size. State-level estimates are available from:
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
February 2018

Long-Term Care Providers and services users in the United States: data from the National Study of Long-Term Care Providers, 2013-2014.

Vital Health Stat 3 2016 Feb(38):x-xii; 1-105

Long-term care services provided by paid, regulated providers are an important component of personal health care spending in the United States. This report presents the most current national descriptive results from the National Study of Long-Term Care Providers (NSLTCP), which is conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). Data presented are drawn from multiple sources, primarily NCHS surveys of adult day services centers and residential care communities (covers 2014 data year); and administrative records obtained from the Centers for Medicare and Medicare Services (CMS) on home health agencies, hospices, and nursing homes (covers 2013 and 2014 data years). This report provides information on the supply, organizational characteristics, staffing, and services offered by paid, regulated providers of long-term care services; and the demographic, health, and functional composition of users of these services. Services users include residents of nursing homes and residential care communities, patients of home health agencies and hospices, and participants of adult day services centers. This report updates "Long-Term Care Services in the United States: 2013 Overview" (available from: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nsltcp/long_term_care_services_2013.pdf), which covered data years 2011 and 2012. In contrast, the title of this report and future reports will reflect the years of the data used rather than the publication year, in this case 2013 through 2014. A forthcoming companion product to this report, "Long-Term Care Providers and Services Users in the United States—State Estimates Supplement: National Study of Long-Term Care Providers, 2013–2014," contains tables and maps showing comparable state estimates for the national findings in this report, and will be available from: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/ nsltcp/nsltcp_products.htm.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
February 2016

Variation in Residential Care Community Resident Characteristics, by Size of Community: United States, 2014.

NCHS Data Brief 2015 Nov(223):1-8

Key Findings: Residents of residential care communities are persons who cannot live independently but generally do not require the skilled care provided by nursing homes. There were 835,200 current residents in residential care communities in 2014 (1,2). "Current residents" refers to those who were living in the community on the day of data collection (as opposed to the total number of residents who lived in the community at some time during the calendar year). This report presents national estimates of selected characteristics of current residents in 2014 and compares these characteristics by community bed size. State-level estimates for these characteristics are available online at: http:// www.cdc.gov/nchs/nsltcp/nsltcp_products.htm.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 2015

Variation in Operating Characteristics of Residential Care Communities, by Size of Community: United States, 2014.

NCHS Data Brief 2015 Nov(222):1-8

Key Findings: Assisted living and similar residential care communities provide services to individuals who cannot live independently but generally do not require the skilled level of care provided by nursing homes. In 2014, there were 30,200 residential care communities nationwide (1). This report presents the most current national estimates of residential care community operating characteristics and compares these characteristics by community bed size. State-level estimates for the characteristics presented in this report are available from http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nsltcp/nsltcp_products.htm.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 2015

Characteristics of residents living in residential care communities, by community bed size: United States, 2012.

NCHS Data Brief 2014 Nov(171):1-8

In 2012, there was a higher percentage of older, female residents in communities with more than 25 beds compared with communities with 4–25 beds. Residents in communities with 4–25 beds were more racially diverse than residents in larger communities. The percentage of Medicaid beneficiaries was higher in communities with 4–25 beds than it was in communities with 26–50 and more than 50 beds. A higher percentage of residents living in communities with 4–25 beds had a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias compared with residents in larger communities. Need for assistance with each of the activities of daily living (ADLs) examined (except walking or locomotion) was substantially higher among residents in communities with 4–25 beds, compared with residents in larger communities. Emergency department visits and discharges from an overnight hospital stay in a 90-day period did not vary across residents by community bed size. This report presents national estimates of residents living in residential care, using data from the first wave of NSLTCP. This brief profile of residential care residents provides useful information to policymakers, providers, researchers, and consumer advocates as they plan to meet the needs of an aging population. The findings also highlight the diversity of residents across the different sizes of residential care communities. Corresponding state estimates and their standard errors for the national figures in this data brief can be found on the NSLTCP website, available from: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nsltcp/nsltcp_products.htm. These national and state estimates establish a baseline for monitoring trends among residents living in residential care.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 2014

Operating characteristics of residential care communities, by community bed size: United States, 2012.

NCHS Data Brief 2014 Nov(170):1-8

In 2012, the majority of residential care communities had 4–25 beds, yet 71% of residents lived in communities with more than 50 beds. A lower percentage of communities with 4–25 beds were chain-affiliated, nonprofit, and in operation 10 years or more, compared with communities with 26–50 and more than 50 beds. Dementia-exclusive care or dementia care units were more common as community size increased. A higher percentage of communities with more than 50 beds screened for cognitive impairment and offered dementia-specific programming compared with communities with 4–25 and 26–50 beds. A higher percentage of communities with more than 50 beds screened for depression compared with communities with 4–25 beds. Compared with communities with 4–25 beds, a higher percentage of communities with 26–50 beds and more than 50 beds provided therapeutic, hospice, mental health, and dental services; but a lower percentage of communities with more than 50 beds provided skilled nursing services than did smaller communities. This report presents national estimates of residential care communities, using data from the first wave of NSLTCP. This brief profile of residential care communities provides useful information to policymakers, providers, researchers, and consumer advocates as they plan to meet the needs of an aging population. The findings also highlight the diversity of residential care communities across different sizes. Corresponding state estimates and their standard errors for the national figures in this data brief can be found on the NSLTCP website at http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nsltcp/ nsltcp_products.htm. These national and state estimates establish a baseline for monitoring trends among residents living in residential care.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 2014

Dementia special care units in residential care communities: United States, 2010.

NCHS Data Brief 2013 Nov(134):1-8

In 2010, 17% of residential care communities had dementia special care units. Beds in dementia special care units accounted for 13% of all residential care beds. Residential care communities with dementia special care units were more likely than those without to have more beds, be chain-affiliated, and be purposely built as a residential care community, and less likely to be certified or registered to participate in Medicaid. Residential care communities with dementia special care units were more likely than those without to be located in the Northeast and in a metropolitan statistical area, and less likely to be in the West. Assisted living and similar residential care communities provide an alternative to nursing homes for individuals with dementia who can no longer live independently. In 2010, about 42% of individuals living in residential care communities had Alzheimer's disease or other dementia. Individuals with dementia can live in residential care communities that have dementia special care units, or in a more traditional setting where these residents are integrated with residents without dementia. Many states require residential care communities with dementia special care units to have certain physical features (e.g., locked door) and specially trained staff to care for residents with dementia. This report compares residential care communities with and without dementia special care units.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 2013

Long-Term Care Services in the United States: 2013 Overview.

Vital Health Stat 3 2013 Dec(37):1-107

Long-term care services include a broad range of services that meet the needs of frail older people and other adults with functional limitations. Long-Term care services provided by paid, regulated providers are a significant component of personal health care spending in the United States. This report presents descriptive results from the first wave of the National Study of Long-Term Care Providers (NSLTCP), which was conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). Data presented in this report are drawn from five sources: NCHS surveys of adult day services centers and residential care communities, and administrative records obtained from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services on home health agencies, hospices, and nursing homes. This report provides information on the supply, organizational characteristics, staffing, and services offered by providers of long-term care services; and the demographic, health, and functional composition of users of these services. Service users include residents of nursing homes and residential care communities, patients of home health agencies and hospices, and participants of adult day services centers.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
December 2013

Trends in length of hospice care from 1996 to 2007 and the factors associated with length of hospice care in 2007: findings from the National Home and Hospice Care Surveys.

Am J Hosp Palliat Care 2014 Jun 6;31(4):356-64. Epub 2013 Jun 6.

1Long-term Care Statistics Branch, Division of Health Care Statistics, National Center for Health Statistics, Hyattsville, MD, USA.

Using the National Home and Hospice Care Surveys, we examined trends in length of hospice care from 1996 to 2007 and the factors associated with length of care in 2007. Results suggest that the increasing average lengths of care over time reflect the increase in the longest duration of care. For-profit ownership is associated with hospice care received for over a year.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1049909113492371DOI Listing
June 2014

Training of home health aides and nurse aides: findings from national data.

Gerontol Geriatr Educ 2012 ;33(4):383-401

Division of Health Care Statistics, National Center for Health Statistics, Hyattsville, Maryland 20782, USA.

Training and satisfaction with training were examined using data from nationally representative samples of 2,897 certified nursing assistants (CNAs) from the National Nursing Assistant Survey and 3,377 home health aides (HHAs) from the National Home Health Aide Survey conducted in 2004 and 2007, respectively. This article focuses on the commonalities and differences in the perceptions of CNAs and HHAs regarding the initial and continuing education they received to prepare them for their job. More than 80% of HHAs and all CNAs received some initial training. Of these, significantly more HHAs compared to CNAs felt that training had prepared them "very well" for their jobs. The two groups also differed in their assessments of the content of the initial training; for example, more CNAs believed that their training was "excellent" in helping them address patients' limitations in activities of daily living compared to HHAs. The vast majority of HHAs and CNAs received continuing education, and about three fourths in each group assessed this training as being "very useful." In light of the increasing demands for HHAs and CNAs with the aging of America, findings from these national studies could be used to inform educational and training initiatives for this critical workforce.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02701960.2012.702167DOI Listing
December 2013

Residential care facilities: a key sector in the spectrum of long-term care providers in the United States.

NCHS Data Brief 2011 Dec(78):1-8

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Health Statistics 3311 Toledo Road, Hyattsville, Maryland 20782, USA.

RCFs in the United States totaled 31,100 in 2010, with 971,900 state-licensed, certified, or registered residential care beds. About one-half of RCFs were small facilities which served one-tenth of all RCF residents. The remaining RCFs were medium-sized facilities (16%) which served about one-tenth of all RCF residents, large facilities (28%) which served about one-half of all RCF residents, and extra large facilities (7%) which housed about three-tenths of all RCF residents. RCFs were predominantly for profit (82%), not part of a chain (62%), and located in an MSA (81%). Small RCFs were more likely to be for profit than larger RCFs. The proportion of chain-affiliated RCFs grew with increasing facility size. Small and extra large RCFs were most likely to be located in an MSA, while medium RCFs were least likely to be in an MSA. RCFs were most commonly located in the West. The mix of facility sizes varied by region. The West had almost twice as many residential care beds per 1,000 persons aged 85 and over as the Northeast (245 to 131). Comparing the supply of RCF beds with nursing home beds (data compiled by Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services) shows that the supply of RCF beds (245) and nursing home beds (203) per 1,000 persons aged 85 and over was relatively comparable in the West, but nursing home beds far outnumbered RCF beds in all other regions. There were about twice as many nursing home beds as RCF beds per 1,000 persons aged 85 and over in the South (325 to 164), Midwest (390 to 177), and Northeast (303 to 131). More research is needed to identify and examine factors that may explain these regional differences in both the supply of residential care beds, including variations in state regulation and financing of different types of LTC providers, and in consumer preferences for different kinds of long-term services and support. RCFs serve primarily a private-pay adult population (6). However, the use of Medicaid financing for services in residential care settings has gradually increased in recent years (7). About 4 out of 10 RCFs had at least one resident who had some or all of their LTC services paid by Medicaid. The percentage of facilities having residents who received LTC services paid by Medicaid varied by facility size. Although nearly all RCFs provided basic health monitoring (96%) and incontinence care (93%), larger RCFs were more likely than smaller RCFs to offer occupational and physical therapy. Larger RCFs were also more likely than small RCFs to provide social services counseling and case management. The provision of skilled nursing services did not vary by facility size. This report presents national estimates of RCFs using data from the first-ever national probability sample survey of RCFs with four or more beds. Findings on differences in selected characteristics and services offered by facility size and on regional variations in the supply of beds provide useful information to policymakers, LTC providers, and consumer advocates as they plan to meet the needs of an aging population. Moreover, these findings establish baseline national estimates as researchers continue to track growth and changes in the residential care industry.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
December 2011

Residents living in residential care facilities: United States, 2010.

NCHS Data Brief 2012 Apr(91):1-8

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Health Statistics 3311 Toledo Road, Hyattsville, Maryland 20782, USA.

In 2010, residential care residents were mostly female, non-Hispanic white, and aged 85 and over, and had a median length of stay of about 22 months. For about 20% of residents—or 137,700 persons—Medicaid paid for at least some long-term care services provided by the RCF. This estimate is similar to that found in a recent study (3). Almost 40% of all residential care residents received assistance with three or more ADL limitations, and over 40% had Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias. These findings suggest a vulnerable population with a high burden of functional and cognitive impairment. Residential care is an important component of the U.S. long-term care system. This report presents national estimates of people living in RCFs, using data from the first-ever national probability sample survey of RCFs with four or more beds. This brief profile of residential care residents may provide useful information to policymakers, providers, and consumer advocates as they plan for the future long-term care needs of older as well as younger adults. In addition, these findings serve as baseline national estimates as researchers continue to track the growth of and changes in the residential care industry.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
April 2012

Design and operation of the 2010 National Survey of Residential Care Facilities.

Vital Health Stat 1 2011 Nov(54):1-131

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, Hyattsville, Maryland 20782, USA.

Objectives: This methods report provides an overview of the National Survey of Residential Care Facilities (NSRCF) conducted in 2010. NSRCF is a first-ever national probability sample survey that collects data on U.S. residential care providers, their staffs and services, and their residents. Included are residential care facilities consisting of assisted living residences; board and care homes; congregate care; enriched housing programs; homes for the aged; personal care homes; and shared housing establishments that are licensed, registered, listed, certified, or otherwise regulated by a state. A survey-specific definition was used to select residential care facilities into the study. This report discusses the need for and objectives of the survey, design process, survey methods, and data availability.

Methods: In 2008, a small pilot study and a pretest were conducted to test and refine the survey protocol, data collection procedures, and questionnaires. NSRCF was conducted between March and November 2010. The survey used a two-stage probability sampling design in which residential care facilities were sampled. Then, depending on facility size, three to six current residents were sampled. In-person interviews were conducted with facility directors and designated staffs; no interviews were conducted with residents. The survey instrument contained a facility screening module, facility- and resident-level modules, a resident sampling module, and a pre-interview worksheet.

Results: National data were collected on 2,302 facilities, and 8,094 current residents. The first-stage facility weighted response rate (for differential probabilities of selection) was 81%. The second-stage resident weighted response rate was 99%. Two public-use files will be released. The facility and resident files include sampling weights to generate national estimates, and design variables to calculate accurate standard errors.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 2011

Racial differences in dementia care among nursing home residents.

J Aging Health 2012 Jun 15;24(4):711-31. Epub 2012 Mar 15.

Long-Term Care Statistics Branch, Division of Health Care Statistics, National Center for Health Statistics, Hyattsville, MD 20782, USA.

Objectives: This article aims to describe potential racial differences in dementia care among nursing home residents with dementia.

Methods: Using data from the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey (NNHS) in regression models, the authors examine whether non-Whites are less likely than Whites to receive special dementia care--defined as receiving special dementia care services or being in a dementia special care unit (SCU)--and whether this difference derives from differences in resident or facility characteristics.

Results: The authors find that non-Whites are 4.3 percentage points less likely than Whites to receive special dementia care.

Discussion: The fact that non-Whites are more likely to rely on Medicaid and less likely to pay out of pocket for nursing home care explains part but not all of the difference. Most of the difference is due to the fact that non-Whites reside in facilities that are less likely to have special dementia care services or dementia care units, particularly for-profit facilities and those in the South.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0898264311432311DOI Listing
June 2012

An overview of home health aides: United States, 2007.

Natl Health Stat Report 2011 May(34):1-31

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, Hyattsville, MD 20782, USA.

Objectives: This report presents national estimates of home health aides providing assistance in activities of daily living (ADLs) and employed by agencies providing home health and hospice care in 2007. Data are presented on demographics, training, work environment, pay and benefits, use of public benefits, and injuries.

Methods: Estimates are based on data collected in the 2007 National Home Health Aide Survey. Estimates are derived from data collected during telephone interviews with home health aides providing assistance with ADLs and employed by agencies providing home health and hospice care.

Results: In the United States in 2007, 160,700 home health and hospice aides provided ADL assistance and were employed by agencies providing home health and hospice care. Most home health aides were female; approximately one-half were white and one-third black. Approximately one-half of aides were at least 35 years old. Two-thirds had an annual family income of less than $40,000. More than 80% received initial training to become a home health aide and more than 90% received continuing education classes in the previous 2 years. Almost three-quarters of aides would definitely become a home health aide again, and slightly more than one-half of aides would definitely take their current job again. The average hourly pay was $10.88 per hour. Almost three-quarters of aides reported that they were offered health insurance by their employers, but almost 19% of aides had no health insurance coverage from any source. More than 1 in 10 aides had had at least one work-related injury in the previous 12 months.

Conclusions: The picture that emerges from this analysis is of a financially vulnerable workforce, but one in which the majority of aides are satisfied with their jobs. The findings may be useful in informing initiatives to train, recruit, and retain these direct care workers.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
May 2011

Home health care and discharged hospice care patients: United States, 2000 and 2007.

Natl Health Stat Report 2011 Apr(38):1-27

Division of Health Care Statistics, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, Hyattsville, MD 20782, USA.

Objectives: This report presents national estimates on home health care patients and discharged hospice care patients. Information on characteristics, length of service, medical diagnoses, functional limitations, service use, advance care planning, and emergent and hospital care use are presented for home health care patients and hospice care discharges. A comparison of selected characteristics for 2000 and 2007 is also provided to highlight changes.

Methods: Estimates are based on data collected on agencies from the 2000 and 2007 National Home and Hospice Care Survey, conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics. Estimates are derived from data collected during interviews with administrators and staff designated by the administrators.

Results: Each day in 2007, there were an estimated 1,459,900 home health care patients. They were predominantly aged 65 years or over, female, and white. Their mean length of service was 315 days, and their most common primary diagnosis at admission was diabetes mellitus. About one-fourth of them had advance care planning and one-fifth had at least one overnight hospital stay since admission to the home health care agency. In 2007, there were 1,045,100 discharged hospice care patients. The majority of discharged patients were aged 65 or over, female, and white, and most were discharged deceased. Their mean length of service was 65 days, and the most common primary diagnosis at admission was malignant neoplasm. Most of them had advance care planning, and about one-fourth had three or more types of advance care planning instruments.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
April 2011

Complementary and alternative therapies in hospice: The national home and hospice care survey: United States, 2007.

Natl Health Stat Report 2011 Jan(33):1-20

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, Hyattsville, MD 20782, USA.

Objective-This report presents national estimates on the provision and use of complementary and alternative therapies (CAT) in hospice. Comparisons of organizational characteristics of hospice care providers are presented by whether the provider offered CAT. Comparisons of selected characteristics of patients discharged from hospice are presented by whether they received care from a provider that offered CAT, and whether they received a CAT service. Methods-Estimates are based on data from the 2007 National Home and Hospice Care Survey (NHHCS), conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics. Results-In 2007, 41.8% of hospice care providers offered CAT services, had a CAT provider on staff or under contract, or both. Among hospice care providers offering CAT, over one-half offered massage (71.7%), supportive group therapy (69.0%), music therapy (62.2%), pet therapy (58.6%), or guided imagery or relaxation (52.7%). Of the hospice care providers that offered CAT, 21.5% had at least one discharged hospice patient who received CAT during hospice care. Overall, 4.9% of all discharged hospice patients received at least one CAT from the hospice care provider. Over one-half of discharged patients (56.5%) received care from a provider that offered CAT, and of those, 8.6% received at least one CAT from the hospice care provider during their stays. There were no differences in demographics, health, functional status, or admission diagnoses between patients discharged from hospice either by whether they received care from a provider that offered CAT or whether they received CAT.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2011

Electronic medical record adoption and use in home health and hospice.

NCHS Data Brief 2010 Sep(45):1-8

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for Health Statistics 3311 Toledo Road, Hyattsville, Maryland 20782, USA.

In 2007, about 5,900 of the 14,500 providers of home health or hospice care (41%) had electronic medical records (EMRs), and an additional 2,200 (15%) planned to have EMRs within the next year. Providers who offered both hospice and home health care were more likely to have EMRs than providers offering only home health care, but did not differ from providers of hospice care only. Among providers with EMRs, 98% used components for recording patient demographics and 83% for clinical notes, and over one-half used clinical decision support systems or computerized physician order entry. Nonprofit and government providers, providers jointly owned or operated with other health care organizations, and providers with over 150 patients were more likely to have EMRs.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 2010

A national overview of the training received by certified nursing assistants working in U.S. nursing homes.

Gerontol Geriatr Educ 2010 ;31(3):201-19

Long-Term Care Statistics Branch, National Center for Health Statistics, 3311 Toledo Road, Hyattsville, MD 20782, USA.

A few geographically limited studies have indicated that training of direct care workers may be insufficient. Using the first-ever nationally representative sample of certified nursing assistants (CNAs) from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey (NNAS), this descriptive article provides an overview of the type of initial training and continuing education received by CNAs working in nursing homes, reports CNAs' assessments of the adequacy of their training, and identifies perceived training needs from the points of view of CNAs. Findings could be used to inform changes to the initial training and continuing education curriculum for this essential labor workforce.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02701960.2010.503122DOI Listing
December 2010

Design and operation of the national home health aide survey: 2007-2008.

Vital Health Stat 1 2010 Mar(49):1-94

U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, Hyattsville, Maryland 20782, USA.

Objectives: This report provides an overview of the National Home Health Aide Survey (NHHAS), the first national probability survey of home health aides. NHHAS was designed to provide national estimates of home health aides who provided assistance in activities of daily living (ADLs) and were directly employed by agencies that provide home health and/or hospice care. This report discusses the need for and objectives of the survey, the design process, the survey methods, and data availability. METHODS NHHAS, a multistage probability sample survey, was conducted as a supplement to the 2007 National Home and Hospice Care Survey (NHHCS). Agencies providing home health and/or hospice care were sampled, and then aides employed by these agencies were sampled and interviewed by telephone. Survey topics included recruitment, training, job history, family life, client relations, work-related injuries, and demographics. NHHAS was virtually identical to the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey of certified nursing assistants employed in sampled nursing homes with minor changes to account for differences in workplace environment and responsibilities. RESULTS From September 2007 to April 2008, interviews were completed with 3,416 aides. A public-use data file that contains the interview responses, sampling weights, and design variables is available. The NHHAS overall response rate weighted by the inverse of the probability of selection was 41 percent. This rate is the product of the weighted first-stage agency response rate of 57 percent (i.e., weighted response rate of 59 percent for agency participation in NHHCS times the weighted response rate of 97 percent for agencies participating in NHHCS that also participated in NHHAS) and the weighted second-stage aide response rate of 72 percent to NHHAS.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 2010

Prevalence and management of pain, by race and dementia among nursing home residents: United States, 2004.

NCHS Data Brief 2010 Mar(30):1-8

Center for Disease Control, National Center for Health Statistics, 3311 Toledo Road, Hyattsville, Maryland 20782, USA.

Key Findings: Data from the National Nursing Home Survey, 2004. About one-quarter of all nursing home residents reported or showed signs of pain. Nonwhite residents and residents with dementia were less likely to report or show signs of pain compared with white residents and residents without dementia. Nonwhite residents with dementia were least likely, and white residents without dementia were most likely to report or show signs of pain. Forty-four percent of nursing home residents with pain received neither standing orders for pain medication nor special services for pain management (i.e., appropriate pain management). Among residents with dementia and pain, nonwhite residents were more likely than white residents to lack appropriate pain management.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 2010

Factors influencing the use of mobility technology in community-based long-term care.

J Aging Health 2004 ;16(2):267-307

Department of Population and Family Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.

Objectives: This article adapts a framework commonly used to model personal long-term care services to examine factors influencing the use of mobility-related assistive devices, both in isolation and in combination with personal care.

Methods: The authors analyze data from Phase 2 of the 1994-1995 National Health Interview Survey Disability Supplements to compare predictors of equipment use with those for personal care and rank the probabilities of using particular combinations according to health needs, access, and personal and family characteristics.

Results: The authors find that underlying health needs are the dominant factor related to the type of care arrangement used. The typical person with a mobility-related disability is most likely to use equipment alone; only at younger ages or at greater levels of severity are other arrangements expected to dominate.

Discussion: Research on the dynamic acquisition process, with attention to age and trajectories of disability severity, is needed to fully understand the integration of technology and personal care.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0898264303262623DOI Listing
April 2004

Gender and disability among older adults in north and South India: differences associated with coresidence and marriage.

J Cross Cult Gerontol 2002 Dec;17(4):313-36

Department of Population and Family Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205-2179, USA.

Women in most settings are more likely than men to experience as well as report poor health and functional disabilities. Studies in the economically advanced countries (as in the US) have also shown an association between gender, marital status and health and disability. However, there is very little information about gender differentials in disability among the elderly in developing countries, especially those in South Asia. Also, little is known about the association between gender, marital status, coresidence with sons, and disability among older adults in these countries. This study uses data from the National Family Health Survey conducted in India in 1991-1992 to assess the gender disparities in functional health among persons 55 years and older and to compare the situation in the northern and southern parts of the country. Using logistic regression analysis, this study examines the relation between marital status, living arrangements and functional status of older adults in the states of Uttar Pradesh and Haryana in the north and Kerala and Tamil Nadu in the south. The results confirm a female disadvantage in physical impairments in the northern states, although these differences are not significant in the south. Marital status and coresidence with sons is associated with impairments and these associations show interesting interactions.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/a:1023079219538DOI Listing
December 2002