Publications by authors named "Magnus Aare"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A new laboratory rig for evaluating helmets subject to oblique impacts.

Traffic Inj Prev 2003 Sep;4(3):240-8

Division of Neuronic Engineering, Department of Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.

Current requirements and regulations governing motorcycle helmets around the world are based on test results of purely radial impacts, which are statistically rare in real accidents. This study presents a new impact rig for subjecting test helmets to oblique impacts, which therefore is able to test impacts of increased statistical relevance to real motorcycle accidents. A number of different head-helmet interfaces have been investigated. A test rig was constructed to produce oblique impacts to helmets simulating those occurring in real motorcycle accidents. A Hybrid III dummy head was fitted with accelerometers to measure the accelerations arising during impact testing. The equipment used for data collection was validated in both translational and rotational acceleration. In order to better resemble the human head, an artificial scalp was fitted to the hybrid dummy. The same test rig was used to investigate the performance of a number of different helmets. Impact velocities ranging from 7.3 to 9.9 m/s were tested using a number of different impact angles and impact areas. This study shows that the new test rig can be used to provide useful data at speeds of up to 50 km/h and with impact angles varying from purely tangential to purely radial. The rotational accelerations observed differ greatly depending on both helmet and scalp designs. For example, a helmet with a sliding outer shell placed on an experimental head fitted with an artificial scalp (made to resemble the human scalp) reduces rotational accelerations of the head by up to 56%, compared with those of an experimental head fitted with a fixed scalp and conventional helmet. The degree of slippage between the skull and the scalp, and between the scalp and the helmet, leads to considerable variation in the results. This innovative test rig appears to provide an accurate method for measuring accelerations in an oblique impact to a helmet. In order to obtain a good level of repeatability in oblique impact testing, it is crucial that the helmet be fixed to the head in the exact same way in each individual test. Both the position and the angle of impact must be reproduced identically in each test. The test rig used here has shown that this type of rig can be used to compare different helmet designs, and it therefore is able to contribute to achieving safer helmets.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15389580309879DOI Listing
September 2003

Injuries from motorcycle- and moped crashes in Sweden from 1987 to 1999.

Inj Control Saf Promot 2003 Sep;10(3):131-8

Department of Aeronautics, Royal Institute of Technology, 10044 Stockholm, Sweden.

The objective of this paper is to study injuries from motorcycle and moped crashes in Sweden from 1987 to 1999. Databases at the National Board for Health and Welfare and codes from both ICD9 and ICD10 systems were used, including patterns of age, gender, E-code and type of injury. Length of hospital stay, type of injuries and trends over time was evaluated. To get a more detailed picture of the age distribution, type of vehicle used and number of killed, data from the Swedish National Road Administration were also used. In Sweden, 27,122 individuals received in-patient care due to motorcycle and moped injuries between 1987 and 1999. The motorcycle and moped injury rate was reduced in the second half of the studied period and so were the total days of treatment per year. Males had eight times the incidence of injuries compared to females. Riders under the age of 26 and in particular those at an age of 15 had the highest incidence rate. Head injuries were the most frequent diagnosis, followed by fractures to the lower limbs. Concussion was the most frequent head injury. Focal and diffuse brain injuries combined showed the same frequency as concussion. It is concluded that more preventative strategies must be presented before the injury rate can be reduced.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1076/icsp.10.3.131.14556DOI Listing
September 2003
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