Publications by authors named "Mael Duménieu"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Mechanisms of Plasticity in Subcortical Visual Areas.

Cells 2021 11 13;10(11). Epub 2021 Nov 13.

INSERM, Aix-Marseille Université, UNIS, 13015 Marseille, France.

Visual plasticity is classically considered to occur essentially in the primary and secondary cortical areas. Subcortical visual areas such as the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) or the superior colliculus (SC) have long been held as basic structures responsible for a stable and defined function. In this model, the dLGN was considered as a relay of visual information travelling from the retina to cortical areas and the SC as a sensory integrator orienting body movements towards visual targets. However, recent findings suggest that both dLGN and SC neurons express functional plasticity, adding unexplored layers of complexity to their previously attributed functions. The existence of neuronal plasticity at the level of visual subcortical areas redefines our approach of the visual system. The aim of this paper is therefore to review the cellular and molecular mechanisms for activity-dependent plasticity of both synaptic transmission and cellular properties in subcortical visual areas.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/cells10113162DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8621502PMC
November 2021

Multiomics of synaptic junctions reveals altered lipid metabolism and signaling following environmental enrichment.

Cell Rep 2021 10;37(1):109797

Leibniz-Institut für Analytische Wissenschaften-ISAS-e.V., 44227 Dortmund, Germany; Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Vienna, 1090 Wien, Austria. Electronic address:

Membrane lipids and their metabolism have key functions in neurotransmission. Here we provide a quantitative lipid inventory of mouse and rat synaptic junctions. To this end, we developed a multiomics extraction and analysis workflow to probe the interplay of proteins and lipids in synaptic signal transduction from the same sample. Based on this workflow, we generate hypotheses about novel mechanisms underlying complex changes in synaptic connectivity elicited by environmental stimuli. As a proof of principle, this approach reveals that in mice exposed to an enriched environment, reduced endocannabinoid synthesis and signaling is linked to increased surface expression of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPAR) in a subset of Cannabinoid-receptor 1 positive synapses. This mechanism regulates synaptic strength in an input-specific manner. Thus, we establish a compartment-specific multiomics workflow that is suitable to extract information from complex lipid and protein networks involved in synaptic function and plasticity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2021.109797DOI Listing
October 2021

The Low-Threshold Calcium Channel Cav3.2 Mediates Burst Firing of Mature Dentate Granule Cells.

Cereb Cortex 2018 07;28(7):2594-2609

Research Group Neuroplasticity, Leibniz Institute for Neurobiology, Brenneckestr. 6, Magdeburg, Germany.

Mature granule cells are poorly excitable neurons that were recently shown to fire action potentials, preferentially in bursts. It is believed that the particularly pronounced short-term facilitation of mossy fiber synapses makes granule cell bursting a very effective means of properly transferring information to CA3. However, the mechanism underlying the unique bursting behavior of mature granule cells is currently unknown. Here, we show that Cav3.2 T-type channels at the axon initial segment are responsible for burst firing of mature granule cells in rats and mice. Accordingly, Cav3.2 knockout mice fire tonic spikes and exhibit impaired bursting, synaptic plasticity and dentate-to-CA3 communication. The data show that Cav3.2 channels are strong modulators of bursting and can be considered a critical molecular switch that enables effective information transfer from mature granule cells to the CA3 pyramids.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cercor/bhy084DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5998957PMC
July 2018

The Segregated Expression of Voltage-Gated Potassium and Sodium Channels in Neuronal Membranes: Functional Implications and Regulatory Mechanisms.

Front Cell Neurosci 2017 24;11:115. Epub 2017 Apr 24.

Research Group Neuroplasticity, Leibniz Institute for NeurobiologyMagdeburg, Germany.

Neurons are highly polarized cells with apparent functional and morphological differences between dendrites and axon. A critical determinant for the molecular and functional identity of axonal and dendritic segments is the restricted expression of voltage-gated ion channels (VGCs). Several studies show an uneven distribution of ion channels and their differential regulation within dendrites and axons, which is a prerequisite for an appropriate integration of synaptic inputs and the generation of adequate action potential (AP) firing patterns. This review article will focus on the signaling pathways leading to segmented expression of voltage-gated potassium and sodium ion channels at the neuronal plasma membrane and the regulatory mechanisms ensuring segregated functions. We will also discuss the relevance of proper ion channel targeting for neuronal physiology and how alterations in polarized distribution contribute to neuronal pathology.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fncel.2017.00115DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5403416PMC
April 2017

Afterhyperpolarization (AHP) regulates the frequency and timing of action potentials in the mitral cells of the olfactory bulb: role of olfactory experience.

Physiol Rep 2015 May;3(5)

Centre de Recherche en Neurosciences de Lyon, INSERM U1028/CNRS UMR5292, Université Lyon1, Lyon, France

Afterhyperpolarization (AHP) is a principal feedback mechanism in the control of the frequency and patterning of neuronal firing. In principal projection neurons of the olfactory bulb, the mitral cells (MCs), the AHP is produced by three separate components: classical potassium-mediated hyperpolarization, and the excitatory and inhibitory components, which are generated by the recurrent dendrodendritic synaptic transmission. Precise spike timing is involved in olfactory coding and learning, as well as in the appearance of population oscillatory activity. However, the contribution of the AHP and its components to these processes remains unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that the AHP is developed with the MC firing frequency and is dominated by the potassium component. We also show that recurrent synaptic transmission significantly modifies MC AHP and that the strength of the hyperpolarization produced by the AHP in the few milliseconds preceding the action potential (AP) emission determines MC firing frequency and AP timing. Moreover, we show that the AHP area is larger in younger animals, possibly owing to increased Ca(2+) influx during MC firing. Finally, we show that olfactory experience selectively reduces the early component of the MC AHP (under 25 msec), thus producing a modification of the AP timing limited to the higher firing frequency. On the basis of these results, we propose that the AHP, and its susceptibility to be selectively modulated by the recurrent synaptic transmission and olfactory experience, participate in odor coding and learning by modifying the frequency and pattern of MC firing.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.14814/phy2.12344DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4463813PMC
May 2015
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