Publications by authors named "M Aabed"

9 Publications

Prevalence and awareness of varicocele among athletes in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Res Rep Urol 2019 13;11:21-27. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia,

Purpose: To evaluate the prevalence and awareness about symptoms, and complications of varicocele among athletes (bodybuilding and aerobics exercises) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Patients And Methods: A cross-sectional study of male athletes aged between 18 and 48 years old was carried out in multiple branches of fitness centers over a period of 13 months in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. A total of 382 face-to-face interviews using a predesigned questionnaire were conducted to identify the levels of knowledge, attitude, and practice. A randomly selected 48 subjects were examined. Varicocele was diagnosed and graded based on clinical examination and Doppler ultrasonography.

Results: Of the participants, 157 (41%) lacked knowledge and awareness regarding varicocele, its symptoms and complications. Of the examined participants, 22 (46%) were found to have varicocele. No difference in varicocele was found among bodybuilders and aerobic athletes (=0.249). Similarly, no difference was related to duration of exercise session whether for 1 hour or more (=0.131). However, our study revealed a higher rate of varicocele among athletes who exercised more than three times per week (=0.009). Testicular volume was neither significantly different among respondents with and without varicocele nor between the left or right sides within each group.

Conclusion: Knowledge about varicocele, its symptoms and complications is poor among male athletes in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Varicocele is more common in athletic men who are frequently exercising. Efforts to increase knowledge and enhance awareness of varicocele in young males, in general, are strongly warranted.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/RRU.S195582DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6386205PMC
February 2019

Cerebral and spinal cord myxopapillary ependymomas: a case report.

Pathology 1996 Nov;28(4):373-6

Department of Neurosurgery, Armed Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

We report the case of a 16 year old male with a left temporal myxopapillary ependymoma which did not demonstrate any connection to the lateral ventricles. The patient had complained of headaches for ten months and signs of increased intracranial pressure for one month. One month post-operatively, because of lower back pain, further investigations disclosed two separate intraspinal myxopapillary ependymomas, one at T12-L1 level and the other at L5-S1 level. It is postulated that the cerebral myxopapillary ependymoma was in fact a secondary from one of the spinal cord tumors. There are only three reports of this type of ependymoma in the cerebrum.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00313029600169394DOI Listing
November 1996

Imaging features of musculoskeletal brucellosis.

Radiographics 1994 Mar;14(2):333-48

Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Riyadh Armed Forces Hospital, Saudi Arabia.

Brucellosis is endemic in certain parts of the world. Musculoskeletal involvement is the most common complication of brucellosis, and the spine is most frequently affected. Between November 1985 and March 1993, 334 patients with radiologically proved musculoskeletal brucellosis were seen. Involvement of the spine was either focal or diffuse, with a predilection to the lumbar region. Erosions and sclerosis in vertebral end plates, changes of inflammation at scintigraphy or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and intact disks were hallmarks of the focal form. Osteomyelitis of neighboring vertebrae, involvement of the intervening disk, and moderate epidural extension were features of diffuse brucellar spondylitis. The great majority of joints with scintigraphic evidence of disease demonstrated normal radiographic findings. Evidence of osteomyelitis or destructive arthritis was encountered in only a few cases. Although radiography is sufficient for demonstrating focal brucellosis, MR imaging is better for assessing diffuse disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1148/radiographics.14.2.8190957DOI Listing
March 1994

Giant craniopharyngioma with blindness reversed by surgery.

Childs Nerv Syst 1993 Aug;9(5):292-4

Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Riyadh Armed Forces Hospital, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

A 3-year-old boy presented with a 3-day history of total blindness. There were no features of raised intracranial pressure or endocrine disturbance. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed a giant craniopharyngioma measuring 5 x 3 cm. It was located in the suprasellar region and produced a mass effect with compression of the III and both lateral ventricles. The tumour extended downwards into the pituitary fossa. Urgent surgical decompression and subtotal excision of the tumour resulted in complete visual recovery in the right eye. The left eye remained blind. The blindness might have been caused by direct pressure on the optic nerves and chiasma by the tumour. The lack of visual recovery in the left eye may be the consequence of additional ischaemic insult to the left optic nerve. It is concluded that surgical decompression should be carried out in a patient with a giant craniopharyngioma presenting with total blindness before the condition is considered hopeless.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00306278DOI Listing
August 1993

Mycetoma: comparison of MR imaging with CT.

Radiology 1991 Mar;178(3):865-70

Department of Radiology, Riyadh Armed Forces Hospital, Saudi Arabia.

Magnetic resonance (MR) images obtained in 18 patients with pathologically confirmed mycetoma in the body (n = 4) or lower extremity (n = 14) were retrospectively reviewed and compared with computed tomographic (CT) scans in 15 patients and surgical findings in 10. T1-weighted images showed an infiltrating mass (same signal intensity as muscle) involving skin, subcutaneous fat, muscles, tendons, and other tissues. On T2-weighted images, the mass and affected structures showed moderately increased signal intensity. Bone marrow involvement was detected in seven patients and was best visualized on T1-weighted images. CT showed moderate enhancement of the infiltrative process in all patients. Bone changes, seen in nine, included coarse trabeculation, periosteal reaction, endosteal proliferation, and patchy destruction. MR imaging and CT were comparable and correlated well with surgery in showing the extent of soft-tissue involvement. Early bone changes (important for therapy planning for pedal mycetoma) were seen only at CT. The study showed that MR imaging is sensitive for assessing the extent of mycetoma in the soft tissues. CT should be the method of choice for staging pedal lesions because it can be used to detect early bone involvement.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1148/radiology.178.3.1994434DOI Listing
March 1991
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