Publications by authors named "Lone Aagesen"

5 Publications

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Evolution of pollination by frugivorous birds in Neotropical Myrtaceae.

PeerJ 2018 27;6:e5426. Epub 2018 Aug 27.

Instituto de Botánica Darwinion (IBODA), CONICET-ANCEFN, San Isidro, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Bird pollination is relatively common in the tropics, and especially in the Americas. In the predominantly Neotropical tribe Myrteae (Myrtaceae), species of two genera, and , offer fleshy, sugary petals to the consumption of birds that otherwise eat fruits, thus pollinating the plants in an unusual plant-animal interaction. The phylogenetic position of these genera has been problematic, and therefore, so was the understanding of the evolution of this interaction. Here we include new sequences of in a comprehensive molecular phylogeny based on a balanced sample of two plastid and two nuclear markers, with the aim of providing the historical framework of pollination by frugivorous birds in Myrteae. We developed 13 flower and inflorescence characters that comprehensively depict the macroscopic morphological components of this interaction. Bayesian and parsimony phylogenies concur in placing both and in a clade with species; with sister to . Mapping of morphological characters indicated some degree of convergence (e.g., fleshy petals, purplish display) but also considerable divergence in key characters that point to rather opposing pollination strategies and also different degrees of specialization in versus . Pollination by frugivorous birds represents a special case of mutualism that highlights the evolutionary complexities of plant-animal interactions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7717/peerj.5426DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6118208PMC
August 2018

Macro-Climatic Distribution Limits Show Both Niche Expansion and Niche Specialization among C4 Panicoids.

PLoS One 2016 7;11(3):e0151075. Epub 2016 Mar 7.

Instituto de Botánica Darwinion (CONICET-ANCEFN), Labarden 200, San Isidro, B1642HYD, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Grasses are ancestrally tropical understory species whose current dominance in warm open habitats is linked to the evolution of C4 photosynthesis. C4 grasses maintain high rates of photosynthesis in warm and water stressed environments, and the syndrome is considered to induce niche shifts into these habitats while adaptation to cold ones may be compromised. Global biogeographic analyses of C4 grasses have, however, concentrated on diversity patterns, while paying little attention to distributional limits. Using phylogenetic contrast analyses, we compared macro-climatic distribution limits among ~1300 grasses from the subfamily Panicoideae, which includes 4/5 of the known photosynthetic transitions in grasses. We explored whether evolution of C4 photosynthesis correlates with niche expansions, niche changes, or stasis at subfamily level and within the two tribes Paniceae and Paspaleae. We compared the climatic extremes of growing season temperatures, aridity, and mean temperatures of the coldest months. We found support for all the known biogeographic distribution patterns of C4 species, these patterns were, however, formed both by niche expansion and niche changes. The only ubiquitous response to a change in the photosynthetic pathway within Panicoideae was a niche expansion of the C4 species into regions with higher growing season temperatures, but without a withdrawal from the inherited climate niche. Other patterns varied among the tribes, as macro-climatic niche evolution in the American tribe Paspaleae differed from the pattern supported in the globally distributed tribe Paniceae and at family level.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0151075PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4780779PMC
July 2016

Phylogeny of the Paniceae (Poaceae: Panicoideae): integrating plastid DNA sequences and morphology into a new classification.

Cladistics 2012 Aug 3;28(4):333-356. Epub 2012 Jan 3.

Instituto de Botánica Darwinion, Labardén 200, San Isidro, B1642HYD, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Included in the PACMAD clade of the family Poaceae (Panicoideae, Arundinoideae, Chloridoideae, Micrairoideae, Aristidoideae, Danthonioideae), the tribe Paniceae s.l. is one of the largest tribes of the subfamily Panicoideae, with more than 2000 species. This tribe comprises a huge morphological, cytological and physiological diversity represented by different inflorescence types, several basic chromosome numbers, and at least four major photosynthetic pathways. The tribe Paniceae has been the subject of molecular studies that have confirmed its paraphyly: two major clades were recognized based on their basic chromosome numbers (x = 9, x = 10). The x = 10 Paniceae clade is sister to the Andropogoneae-Arundinelleae s.s. clade (x = 10), while the combined x = 10 clade is sister to the x = 9 clade that contains the remaining genera of Paniceae. As a result of a recent realignment within the tribe in terms of the phylogenetic position of minor and major Paniceae genera, a reanalysis of the whole sampling is performed and new underrepresented taxa are discussed. A total of 155 genera, currently considered within subfamily Panicoideae, are represented here by almost all genera of Paniceae s.l., representatives of Andropogoneae and Arundinelleae s.s., and the endemic and small tribe Steyermarkochloeae; we also included specimens of subfamily Micrairoideae, tribes Isachneae and Eriachneae. The sampling includes as outgroups 18 genera of the PACMAD clade (excluding Panicoideae) and four genera from the BEP clade (Bambusoideae, Ehrhartoideae, Pooideae), rooting with Bromus inermis. A matrix with 265 taxa based on the combined evidence from ndhF plastid sequences (2074 bp) and 57 morphological characters was subjected to parsimony analyses. Jackknife resampling was used to calculate group support. Most clades are characterized by morphological, cytological, anatomical, and/or physiological characters. Major tribal changes are based on the basic chromosome number; the pantropical x = 9 clade is here recognized as Paniceae s.s., while the American x = 10 Paniceae s.l. is restricted to the reinstated tribe Paspaleae. The optimization of the photosynthetic pathway for the Paspaleae-Andropogoneae-Arundinelleae s.s. clade, including the monotypic Reynaudia, shows a plesiomorphic C state while the ancestral state for Paniceae s.s. is ambiguous. If Reynaudia were not included or placed elsewhere, the ancestral photosynthetic pathway for both the Paspaleae-Andropogoneae-Arundinelleae s.s. clade and the Paniceae s.s. would be unambiguously C . In order to explore character evolution further, the morphological characters were mapped onto one of the most parsimonious trees. A relationship between photosynthetic pathways and inflorescence morphology is suggested here for the first time. Based on the optimization of morphological characters and additional data, we propose names for almost all inner clades at the rank of subtribe with a few groups as incertae sedis. With this extensive sampling, we resolved the phylogenetic relationships and the assignation of synapomorphies, and improved the support in subtribe sorting; consequently a robust circumscription of the tribe Paniceae s.l. is proposed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1096-0031.2011.00384.xDOI Listing
August 2012

Direct optimization, affine gap costs, and node stability.

Authors:
Lone Aagesen

Mol Phylogenet Evol 2005 Sep;36(3):641-53

Division of Invertebrate Zoology, American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY 10024-5192, USA.

The outcome of a phylogenetic analysis based on DNA sequence data is highly dependent on the homology-assignment step and may vary with alignment parameter costs. Robustness to changes in parameter costs is therefore a desired quality of a data set because the final conclusions will be less dependent on selecting a precise optimal cost set. Here, node stability is explored in relationship to separate versus combined analysis in three different data sets, all including several data partitions. Robustness to changes in cost sets is measured as number of successive changes that can be made in a given cost set before a specific clade is lost. The changes are in all cases base change cost, gap penalties, and adding/removing/changing affine gap costs. When combining data partitions, the number of clades that appear in the entire parameter space is not remarkably increased, in some cases this number even decreased. However, when combining data partitions the trees from cost sets including affine gap costs were always more similar than the trees were from cost sets without affine gap costs. This was not the case when the data partitions were analyzed independently. When data sets were combined approximately 80% of the clades found under cost sets including affine gap costs resisted at least one change to the cost set.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2005.04.012DOI Listing
September 2005

An empirical test of the treatment of indels during optimization alignment based on the phylogeny of the genus Secale (Poaceae).

Mol Phylogenet Evol 2004 Mar;30(3):733-42

Botanical Institute, University of Copenhagen, Gothersgade 140, DK-1123 Copenhagen K, Denmark.

The ability of the program POY, implementing optimization alignment, to deal with major indels is explored and discussed in connection with a phylogenetic analysis of the genus Secale based on partial Adh1 sequences. The Adh1 sequences used span exon 2-4. Nearly all variation is found in intron 2 and intron 3, which form the basis for the phylogenetic analyses. Both in some ingroup and outgroup taxa intron 3 has a major duplication. Previous phylogenetic analyses have repeatedly confirmed monophyly of both Secale and Hordeum, the latter being part of the outgroup. However, optimization alignment only recovers both genera as monophyletic when knowledge of the duplication is incorporated in the analysis. The phylogenetic relationships within Secale are not clearly resolved. Subspecific taxa of Secale strictum have identical sequences and they are confined to a monophyletic group. However, the two subspecific taxa of Secale cereale do not form a monophyletic group, and the position of Secale sylvestre is uncertain.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1055-7903(03)00206-9DOI Listing
March 2004
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