Publications by authors named "Lian Mignacca"

10 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A hydride transfer complex reprograms NAD metabolism and bypasses senescence.

Mol Cell 2021 Sep;81(18):3848-3865.e19

CRCHUM, 900 Saint-Denis St, Montréal, QC H2X 0A9, Canada; Département de Biochimie et Médecine Moléculaire, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC H3C 3J7, Canada. Electronic address:

Metabolic rewiring and redox balance play pivotal roles in cancer. Cellular senescence is a barrier for tumorigenesis circumvented in cancer cells by poorly understood mechanisms. We report a multi-enzymatic complex that reprograms NAD metabolism by transferring reducing equivalents from NADH to NADP. This hydride transfer complex (HTC) is assembled by malate dehydrogenase 1, malic enzyme 1, and cytosolic pyruvate carboxylase. HTC is found in phase-separated bodies in the cytosol of cancer or hypoxic cells and can be assembled in vitro with recombinant proteins. HTC is repressed in senescent cells but induced by p53 inactivation. HTC enzymes are highly expressed in mouse and human prostate cancer models, and their inactivation triggers senescence. Exogenous expression of HTC is sufficient to bypass senescence, rescue cells from complex I inhibitors, and cooperate with oncogenic RAS to transform primary cells. Altogether, we provide evidence for a new multi-enzymatic complex that reprograms metabolism and overcomes cellular senescence.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.molcel.2021.08.028DOI Listing
September 2021

SOCS1: phosphorylation, dimerization and tumor suppression.

Oncoscience 2019 Nov 23;6(11-12):386-389. Epub 2019 Dec 23.

Département de Biochimie et Médecine Moléculaire, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada.

Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) family members are upregulated following JAK-STAT pathway activation by cytokines. SOCS proteins are recognized inhibitors of cytokine signaling playing roles in cell growth and differentiation. Moreover, SOCS1 and SOCS3 have been shown to be involved in tumor suppression through their ability to interact with p53 leading to the activation of its transcriptional program and showing the implication of SOCS family members in the regulation of apoptosis, ferroptosis and senescence. More recently, we demonstrated that the SRC family of non-receptor tyrosine kinases (SFK) can phosphorylate SOCS1 leading to its homodimerization and inhibiting its interaction with p53. Then, we reactivated the SOCS1-p53 tumor suppressor axis with the SFK inhibitor dasatinib in combination with the p53 activating compound PRIMA. This work suggests new avenues for cancer treatment and leaves open several new questions that deserve to be addressed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.18632/oncoscience.495DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6959930PMC
November 2019

Phosphorylation of SOCS1 Inhibits the SOCS1-p53 Tumor Suppressor Axis.

Cancer Res 2019 07 17;79(13):3306-3319. Epub 2019 May 17.

Département de Biochimie et Médecine Moléculaire, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada.

Expression of the suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 (SOCS1) is inactivated in hematopoietic and solid cancers by promoter methylation, miRNA-mediated silencing, and mutations. Paradoxically, SOCS1 is also overexpressed in many human cancers. We report here that the ability of SOCS1 to interact with p53 and regulate cellular senescence depends on a structural motif that includes tyrosine (Y)80 in the SH2 domain of SOCS1. Mutations in this motif are found at low frequency in some human cancers, and substitution of Y80 by a phosphomimetic residue inhibits p53-SOCS1 interaction and its functional consequences, including stimulation of p53 transcriptional activity, growth arrest, and cellular senescence. Mass spectrometry confirmed SOCS1 Y80 phosphorylation in cells, and a new mAb was generated to detect its presence in tissues by IHC. A tyrosine kinase library screen identified the SRC family as Y80-SOCS1 kinases. SRC family kinase inhibitors potentiated the SOCS1-p53 pathway and reinforced SOCS1-induced senescence. Samples from human lymphomas that often overexpress SOCS1 also displayed SRC family kinase activation, constitutive phosphorylation of SOCS1 on Y80, and SOCS1 cytoplasmic localization. Collectively, these results reveal a mechanism that inactivates the SOCS1-p53 senescence pathway and suggest that inhibition of SRC family kinases as personalized treatment in patients with lymphomas may be successful. SIGNIFICANCE: These findings show that SOCS1 phosphorylation by the SRC family inhibits its tumor-suppressive activity, indicating that patients with increased SOCS1 phosphorylation may benefit from SRC family kinase inhibitors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-18-1503DOI Listing
July 2019

Ribosomal protein RPL22/eL22 regulates the cell cycle by acting as an inhibitor of the CDK4-cyclin D complex.

Cell Cycle 2019 Mar - Apr;18(6-7):759-770. Epub 2019 Mar 28.

a Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine , Université de Montréal , Montréal , Québec , Canada.

Senescence is a tumor suppressor program characterized by a stable growth arrest while maintaining cell viability. Senescence-associated ribogenesis defects (SARD) have been shown to regulate senescence through the ability of the ribosomal protein S14 (RPS14 or uS11) to bind and inhibit the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4). Here we report another ribosomal protein that binds and inhibits CDK4 in senescent cells: L22 (RPL22 or eL22). Enforcing the expression of RPL22/eL22 is sufficient to induce an RB and p53-dependent cellular senescent phenotype in human fibroblasts. Mechanistically, RPL22/eL22 can interact with and inhibit CDK4-Cyclin D1 to decrease RB phosphorylation both in vitro and in cells. Briefly, we show that ribosome-free RPL22/eL22 causes a cell cycle arrest which could be relevant during situations of nucleolar stress such as cellular senescence or the response to cancer chemotherapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15384101.2019.1593708DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6464582PMC
April 2020

The sequence features that define efficient and specific hAGO2-dependent miRNA silencing guides.

Nucleic Acids Res 2018 09;46(16):8181-8196

Institut de recherche en immunologie et en cancérologie (IRIC), Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec H3C 3J7, Canada.

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are ribonucleic acids (RNAs) of ∼21 nucleotides that interfere with the translation of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) and play significant roles in development and diseases. In bilaterian animals, the specificity of miRNA targeting is determined by sequence complementarity involving the seed. However, the role of the remaining nucleotides (non-seed) is only vaguely defined, impacting negatively on our ability to efficiently use miRNAs exogenously to control gene expression. Here, using reporter assays, we deciphered the role of the base pairs formed between the non-seed region and target mRNA. We used molecular modeling to reveal that this mechanism corresponds to the formation of base pairs mediated by ordered motions of the miRNA-induced silencing complex. Subsequently, we developed an algorithm based on this distinctive recognition to predict from sequence the levels of mRNA downregulation with high accuracy (r2 > 0.5, P-value < 10-12). Overall, our discovery improves the design of miRNA-guide sequences used to simultaneously downregulate the expression of multiple predetermined target genes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gky546DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6144789PMC
September 2018

Senescence-associated ribosome biogenesis defects contributes to cell cycle arrest through the Rb pathway.

Nat Cell Biol 2018 07 25;20(7):789-799. Epub 2018 Jun 25.

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Cellular senescence is a tumour suppressor programme characterized by a stable cell cycle arrest. Here we report that cellular senescence triggered by a variety of stimuli leads to diminished ribosome biogenesis and the accumulation of both rRNA precursors and ribosomal proteins. These defects were associated with reduced expression of several ribosome biogenesis factors, the knockdown of which was also sufficient to induce senescence. Genetic analysis revealed that Rb but not p53 was required for the senescence response to altered ribosome biogenesis. Mechanistically, the ribosomal protein S14 (RPS14 or uS11) accumulates in the soluble non-ribosomal fraction of senescent cells, where it binds and inhibits CDK4 (cyclin-dependent kinase 4). Overexpression of RPS14 is sufficient to inhibit Rb phosphorylation, inducing cell cycle arrest and senescence. Here we describe a mechanism for maintaining the senescent cell cycle arrest that may be relevant for cancer therapy, as well as biomarkers to identify senescent cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41556-018-0127-yDOI Listing
July 2018

Quantitative SUMO proteomics reveals the modulation of several PML nuclear body associated proteins and an anti-senescence function of UBC9.

Sci Rep 2018 05 17;8(1):7754. Epub 2018 May 17.

Institute of Research in Immunology and Cancer, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC H3C 3J7, Canada.

Several regulators of SUMOylation have been previously linked to senescence but most targets of this modification in senescent cells remain unidentified. Using a two-step purification of a modified SUMO3, we profiled the SUMO proteome of senescent cells in a site-specific manner. We identified 25 SUMO sites on 23 proteins that were significantly regulated during senescence. Of note, most of these proteins were PML nuclear body (PML-NB) associated, which correlates with the increased number and size of PML-NBs observed in senescent cells. Interestingly, the sole SUMO E2 enzyme, UBC9, was more SUMOylated during senescence on its Lys-49. Functional studies of a UBC9 mutant at Lys-49 showed a decreased association to PML-NBs and the loss of UBC9's ability to delay senescence. We thus propose both pro- and anti-senescence functions of protein SUMOylation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-25150-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5958138PMC
May 2018

SOCS1 regulates senescence and ferroptosis by modulating the expression of p53 target genes.

Aging (Albany NY) 2017 10;9(10):2137-2162

Département de Biochimie et Médecine Moléculaire; Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec H3C 3J7, Canada.

The mechanism by which p53 suppresses tumorigenesis remains poorly understood. In the context of aberrant activation of the JAK/STAT5 pathway, SOCS1 is required for p53 activation and the regulation of cellular senescence. In order to identify p53 target genes acting during the senescence response to oncogenic STAT5A, we characterized the transcriptome of STAT5A-expressing cells after SOCS1 inhibition. We identified a set of SOCS1-dependent p53 target genes that include several secreted proteins and genes regulating oxidative metabolism and ferroptosis. Exogenous SOCS1 was sufficient to regulate the expression of p53 target genes and sensitized cells to ferroptosis. This effect correlated with the ability of SOCS1 to reduce the expression of the cystine transporter SLC7A11 and the levels of glutathione. SOCS1 and SOCS1-dependent p53 target genes were induced during the senescence response to oncogenic STAT5A, RasV12 or the tumor suppressor PML. However, while SOCS1 sensitized cells to ferroptosis neither RasV12 nor STAT5A mimicked the effect. Intriguingly, PML turned cells highly resistant to ferroptosis. The results indicate different susceptibilities to ferroptosis in senescent cells depending on the trigger and suggest the possibility of killing senescent cells by inhibiting pathways that mediate ferroptosis resistance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.18632/aging.101306DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5680560PMC
October 2017

A CDK4/6-Dependent Epigenetic Mechanism Protects Cancer Cells from PML-induced Senescence.

Cancer Res 2016 06 29;76(11):3252-64. Epub 2016 Mar 29.

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada.

Promyelocytic leukemia (PML) plays a tumor suppressive role by inducing cellular senescence in response to oncogenic stress. However, tumor cell lines fail to engage in complete senescence upon PML activation. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms underlying resistance to PML-induced senescence. Here, we report that activation of the cyclin-dependent kinases CDK4 and CDK6 are essential and sufficient to impair senescence induced by PML expression. Disrupting CDK function by RNA interference or pharmacological inhibition restored senescence in tumor cells and diminished their tumorigenic potential in mouse xenograft models. Complete senescence correlated with an increase in autophagy, repression of E2F target genes, and an gene expression signature of blocked DNA methylation. Accordingly, treatment of tumor cells with inhibitors of DNA methylation reversed resistance to PML-induced senescence. Further, CDK inhibition with palbociclib promoted autophagy-dependent degradation of the DNA methyltransferase DNMT1. Lastly, we found that CDK4 interacted with and phosphorylated DNMT1 in vitro, suggesting that CDK activity is required for its stabilization. Taken together, our findings highlight a potentially valuable feature of CDK4/6 inhibitors as epigenetic modulators to facilitate activation of senescence programs in tumor cells. Cancer Res; 76(11); 3252-64. ©2016 AACR.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-15-2347DOI Listing
June 2016

Sponges against miR-19 and miR-155 reactivate the p53-Socs1 axis in hematopoietic cancers.

Cytokine 2016 06 1;82:80-6. Epub 2016 Feb 1.

Département de biochimie et médecine moléculaire, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-Ville, Montréal, Québec H3C 3J7, Canada. Electronic address:

Normal cell proliferation is controlled by a balance between signals that promote or halt cell proliferation. Micro RNAs are emerging as key elements in providing fine signal balance in different physiological situations. Here we report that STAT5 signaling induces the miRNAs miR-19 and miR-155, which potentially antagonize the tumor suppressor axis composed by the STAT5 target gene SOCS1 (suppressor of cytokine signaling-1) and its downstream effector p53. MiRNA sponges against miR-19 or miR-155 inhibit the functions of these miRNAs and potentiate the induction of SOCS1 and p53 in mouse leukemia cells and in human myeloma cells. Adding a catalytic RNA motif of the hammerhead type within miRNA sponges against miR-155 leads to decreased miR-155 levels and increased their ability of inhibiting cell growth and cell migration in myeloma cells. The results indicate that antagonizing miRNA activity can reactivate tumor suppressor pathways downstream cytokine stimulation in tumor cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cyto.2016.01.015DOI Listing
June 2016
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