Publications by authors named "Lene Aarenstrup"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A Sleeping Beauty DNA transposon-based genetic sensor for functional screening of vitamin D3 analogues.

BMC Biotechnol 2011 Apr 7;11:33. Epub 2011 Apr 7.

Department of Human Genetics, University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark.

Background: Analogues of vitamin D3 are extensively used in the treatment of various illnesses, such as osteoporosis, inflammatory skin diseases, and cancer. Functional testing of new vitamin D3 analogues and formulations for improved systemic and topical administration is supported by sensitive screening methods that allow a comparative evaluation of drug properties. As a new tool in functional screening of vitamin D3 analogues, we describe a genomically integratable sensor for sensitive drug detection. This system facilitates assessment of the pharmacokinetic and pharmadynamic properties of vitamin D3 analogues. The tri-cistronic genetic sensor encodes a drug-sensoring protein, a reporter protein expressed from an activated sensor-responsive promoter, and a resistance marker.

Results: The three expression cassettes, inserted in a head-to-tail orientation in a Sleeping Beauty DNA transposon vector, are efficiently inserted as a single genetic entity into the genome of cells of interest in a reaction catalyzed by the hyperactive SB100X transposase. The applicability of the sensor for screening purposes is demonstrated by the functional comparison of potent synthetic analogues of vitamin D3 designed for the treatment of psoriasis and cancer. In clones of human keratinocytes carrying from a single to numerous insertions of the vitamin D3 sensor, a sensitive sensor read-out is detected upon exposure to even low concentrations of vitamin D3 analogues. In comparative studies, the sensor unveils superior potency of new candidate drugs in comparison with analogues that are currently in clinical use.

Conclusions: Our findings demonstrate the use of the genetic sensor as a tool in first-line evaluation of new vitamin D3 analogues and pave the way for new types of drug delivery studies in sensor-transgenic animals.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1472-6750-11-33DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3083354PMC
April 2011

HDAC activity is required for p65/RelA-dependent repression of PPARdelta-mediated transactivation in human keratinocytes.

J Invest Dermatol 2008 May 22;128(5):1095-106. Epub 2007 Nov 22.

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.

Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) play a key role in differentiation, inflammation, migration, and survival of epidermal keratinocytes. The NF-kappaB has long been known to play pivotal roles in immune and inflammatory responses, and furthermore NF-kappaB has been implicated in the regulation of epidermal homeostasis. Recent studies have established that p65/RelA is a potent repressor of PPARdelta-mediated transactivation in human keratinocytes. In this article we further investigate the molecular mechanisms dictating the NF-kappaB-dependent repression of PPARdelta in human keratinocytes. We demonstrate that repression is unique to p65/RelA, as no other member of the NF-kappaB family had an impact on PPARdelta-mediated transactivation. Interestingly, our results show that p65/RelA only represses PPARdelta-dependent transactivation when PPARdelta is bound to DNA via its DNA-binding domain. We show that repression is sensitive to inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs) by tricostatin A (TSA), suggesting that HDAC activity is indispensable for p65/RelA-mediated repression. Accordingly, we demonstrate that a ternary complex consisting of PPARdelta, p65/RelA, and HDAC1 is formed in vivo. Finally, we demonstrate that TSA relieves tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha)-induced repression of PPARdelta-mediated transactivation of the PPARdelta target gene adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP) indicating that cross-talk between PPARdelta and NF-kappaB is of biological significance in human keratinocytes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.jid.5701146DOI Listing
May 2008

Tissue distribution, intracellular localization and proteolytic processing of rat 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase.

Cell Biol Int 2003 ;27(8):611-24

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense M, Denmark

4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPD) is an important enzyme involved in tyrosine catabolism. HPD was shown to be identical to a protein named the F-antigen, exploited by immunologists because of its unique immunological properties. Congenital HPD deficiency is a rare, relatively benign condition known as hereditary type III tyrosinemia. Decreased expression of HPD is often observed in association with the severe type I tyrosinemia, and interestingly, inhibition of HPD activity seems to ameliorate the clinical symptoms of type I tyrosinemia. In this study we present a comprehensive analysis of tissue specific expression and intracellular localization of HPD in the rat. By combined use of in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry we confirm previously known sites of expression in liver and kidney. In addition, we show that HPD is abundantly expressed in neurons in the cortex, cerebellum and hippocampus. By using immunoelectron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy, we provide evidence that HPD contrary to earlier assumptions specifically localizes to membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus. Detailed mass spectrometric analyses of HPD purified from rat liver revealed N-terminal and C-terminal processing of HPD, and expression of recombinant HPD suggested that C-terminal processing enhances the enzymatic activity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s1065-6995(03)00117-3DOI Listing
March 2004

Expression and post-translational modification of human 4-hydroxy-phenylpyruvate dioxygenase.

Cell Biol Int 2002 ;26(7):615-25

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, DK-5230, Odense M, Denmark.

4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPD) (EC 1.13.11.27) is a key enzyme involved in tyrosine catabolism. Congenital HPD deficiency is a rare, relatively benign condition known as hereditary type III tyrosinemia. The severe type I tyrosinemia, caused by a deficiency of fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase which functions downstream of HPD in the tyrosine degradation pathway, is often associated with decreased expression of HPD, and interestingly, inhibition of HPD activity seems to ameliorate the clinical symptoms of type I tyrosinemia. The HPD gene was previously mapped to the chromosomal region 12q24-->qter. In the present study high-resolution chromosome mapping localized the HPD gene to 12q24.31. DNase I footprinting, revealed that four regions of the HPD promoter were protected by rat liver nuclear proteins. Computer-assisted analyses suggested that these elements might bind Sp1/AP2, HNF4, HNF3/CREB, and C/EBP, respectively. In transient transfection experiments, the proximal 271bp of the promoter conferred basal transcriptional activation in human Chang cells. Sequences in intron 1 were able to enhance the activity of this basal promoter. Finally, vaccinia virus-based expression provided evidence that HPD is subject to phosphorylation, and furthermore, allowed mapping of the HPD protein in the human keratinocyte 2D database.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1006/cbir.2002.0896DOI Listing
March 2012
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