Publications by authors named "Laura Díez-Juárez"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Spanish allele and haplotype database for 32 X-chromosome Insertion-Deletion polymorphisms.

Forensic Sci Int Genet 2020 05 13;46:102262. Epub 2020 Feb 13.

Laboratory of Forensic and Population Genetics, Legal Medicine, Psychiatry and Pathology Department, Medicine School, Complutense University of Madrid (UCM), Pza. Ramón y Cajal s/n 28040 Madrid, Spain; Legal Medicine, Psychiatry and Pathology Department, Medicine School, Complutense University of Madrid (UCM), Madrid, Spain; Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria del Hospital Clínico San Carlos (IdISSC), Madrid, Spain.

X-chromosome markers have been proved to be decisive both complementing and solving kinship analysis, particularly when autosomal markers are not able to produce adequate likelihood ratios between different hypothesis. On the other hand, Pereira et al., (2012) have demonstrated that 32 Insertion/Deletion (InDel) markers located on the X-Chromosome have a very important power of discrimination in human populations, being a novel tool in the forensic and population fields. So, the aim of the present work was testing the forensic and population genetic efficiency of the 32 X-InDel polymorphisms in the Spanish population, and subsequently build an allele/haplotype frequencies database. To accomplish this objective, a total of 555 samples comprising male individuals from 13 Spanish regions were analysed for the above mentioned 32 X-InDels in two independent laboratories. A pairwise F analysis was performed in order to understand if the studied Spanish sub-populations present significant differences among them, detecting possible population substructure. Also, linkage disequilibrium analyses were computed to investigate the presence of association between markers in the Spanish population. After Bonferroni correction, the absence of significant differences among the studied regions supports a global Spanish population database. Concerning LD, besides previously reported linked markers MID356-MID357 and MID3690-MID3719-MID2089, we also detected significant association between MID3703-MID3774, even after Bonferroni correction. Finally, after computing allele and haplotype frequencies, forensic efficiency parameters were calculated (PD = 99.999976 %; PD = 99.99999999998 %). Mean exclusion chance values for duos were 0.999 and trios 0.99999. These results reinforce the suitability of the 32 X-InDels marker set both in identification and kinship studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fsigen.2020.102262DOI Listing
May 2020

Paternal and maternal mutations in X-STRs: A GHEP-ISFG collaborative study.

Forensic Sci Int Genet 2020 05 5;46:102258. Epub 2020 Feb 5.

Laboratório de Diagnóstico por DNA (LDD), Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

The GHEP-ISFG organized a collaborative study to estimate mutation rates for the markers included in the Investigator Argus X-12 QS kit Qiagen. A total of 16 laboratories gathered data from 1,612 father/mother/daughter trios, which were used to estimate both maternal and paternal mutation rates, when pooled together with other already published data. Data on fathers and mothers' age at the time of birth of the daughter were also available for ∼93 % of the cases. Population analyses were computed considering the genetic information of a subset of 1,327 unrelated daughters, corresponding to 2,654 haplotypes from residents in several regions of five countries: Argentina, Brazil, Ecuador, Portugal and Spain. Genetic differentiation analyses between the population samples from the same country did not reveal signs of significant stratification, although results from Hardy-Weinberg and linkage disequilibrium tests indicated the need of larger studies for Ecuador and Brazilian populations. The high genetic diversity of the markers resulted in a large number of haplotype combinations, showing the need of huge databases for reliable estimates of their frequencies. It should also be noted the high number of new alleles found, many of them not included in the allelic ladders provided with the kit, as very diverse populations were analyzed. The overall estimates for locus specific average mutation rates varied between 7.5E-04 (for DXS7423) and 1.1E-02 (for DXS10135), the latter being a troublesome figure for kinship analyses. Most of the found mutations (∼92 %) are compatible with the gain or loss of a single repeat. Paternal mutation rates showed to be 5.2 times higher than maternal ones. We also found that older fathers were more prone to transmit mutated alleles, having this trend not been observed in the case of the mothers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fsigen.2020.102258DOI Listing
May 2020