Publications by authors named "Laura Aaron"

21 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Reflection as a Tool for Personal and Professional Development.

Radiol Technol 2021 Nov;93(2):130-140

Joseph Andary, MPH, is a retired faculty member at Northwest State University School of Allied Health in Shreveport.

Purpose: To evaluate the use of reflection by radiography students and radiographers.

Methods: Radiography students and radiographers completed reflection assignments as a part of capstone courses, which were taken near graduation in an entry-level bachelor of science radiography program (BSRS) and a bachelor of science completion program (registered technologist to BSRS). Responses were evaluated to determine achievement of predetermined outcomes and objectives.

Results: There were 115 students and 25 radiographers who completed the reflection assignments. The mean scores of radiography students and current radiographers were measured to address the achievement of 2 student learning outcomes. Student learning outcome 1 contained 6 objectives, and it was found that radiographers scored significantly higher than did radiography students on 5 of the 6 objectives. Student learning outcome 2 had 5 objectives, and it was found that radiographers also scored significantly higher on each objective.

Discussion: Although most radiography students and radiographers were able to link theory with practice through reflection to some degree, it was discovered that radiographers scored significantly higher than did radiography students in 10 of the 11 objectives, using these same outcome assessments. The results seem to indicate that the additional clinical experiences of radiographers, compared with radiography students, enabled radiographers to better reflect on their previous learning and apply it to new and different situations. Despite differences in the ability to critically reflect on previous learning, however, it is thought that students and technologists can use what they learn through reflection for continued professional development. In addition, educators can use this information to identify areas for improvement in their programs.

Conclusion: Radiographers and radiography students were able to apply knowledge gained through critical reflection in clinical practice. Compared with radiography students, radiographers have a greater capacity to reflect critically. The ability for greater reflection is partly due to having more clinical experiences to use as a frame of reference for reflection. Therefore, guided and critical reflection is useful for students and radiographers to apply theory learned to the clinical environment.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 2021

The Development and Evaluation of a Scale to Measure Professional Values in Radiologic Technology.

Radiol Technol 2021 Sep;93(1):25-35

Joseph Andary, MPH, is assistant professor for the College of Nursing and School of Allied Health at Northwestern State University.

Purpose: To develop an instrument to measure professional values in radiologic technology.

Methods: The original Professionalism in Physical Therapy Core Values Self-Assessment instrument was modified into the Radiologic Technologists' Perceptions of Professional Values Scale (RTPPVS), which had 61 items. Psychometric analysis was used to produce the final 34-item scale.

Results: The psychometric properties of the scale were examined using factor analysis and item analysis. The scale was refined using factor analysis to produce the final 34-item scale.

Discussion: A factor analysis was performed on the RTPPVS and the scale was revised from 61 items to 34 items and renamed as the Haynes Scale of Professionalism for Radiologic Technology. The results of this study provide psychometric support for a professionalism scale for radiologic technology, which can be used as an assessment instrument for radiologic science educational programs and technologists.

Conclusion: An instrument was created to measure professionalism in radiologic technology. Professional values encourage consistent patterns of behaviors, which are internal motivations to do the right thing. Adopting professional values stimulates the appropriate professional conduct, thereby supporting the legal, ethical, and regulatory standards.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 2021

Remembering a Colleague, Mentor, and Friend.

Authors:
Laura Aaron

Radiol Technol 2019 05;90(5):441

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
May 2019

Student Perceptions of Online Radiologic Science Courses.

Radiol Technol 2017 Mar;88(4):366-372

Purpose: To evaluate student perceptions of the effectiveness of online radiologic science courses by examining various learning activities and course characteristics experienced in the online learning environment.

Methods: A researcher-designed electronic survey was used to obtain results from students enrolled in the clinical portion of a radiologic science program that offers online courses. The survey consisted of elements associated with demographics, experience, and perceptions related to online radiologic science courses. Surveys were sent to 35 program directors of Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology-accredited associate and bachelor's degree programs with requests to share the survey with students.

Results: The 38 students who participated in the survey identified 4 course characteristics most important for effective online radiologic science courses: a well-organized course, timely instructor feedback, a variety of learning activities, and informative documents, such as course syllabus, calendar, and rubrics.

Discussion: Learner satisfaction is a successful indicator of engagement in online courses. Descriptive statistical analysis indicated that elements related to the instructor's role is one of the most important components of effectiveness in online radiologic science courses. This role includes providing an organized course with informative documents, a variety of learning activities, and timely feedback and communication.

Conclusion: Although online courses should provide many meaningful learning activities that appeal to a wide range of learning styles, the nature of the course affects the types of learning activities used and therefore could decrease the ability to vary learning activities.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 2017

JRCERT Continues Its Long-standing Recognition by the U.S. Department of Education.

Authors:
Laura S Aaron

Radiol Technol 2016 Jul;87(6):675-6

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
July 2016

Distance Education Standards.

Authors:
Laura Aaron

Radiol Technol 2015 Sep-Oct;87(1):103-5

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
June 2016

Reporting program effectiveness data.

Authors:
Laura Aaron

Radiol Technol 2014 Nov-Dec;86(2):224-6

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
July 2015

Technologists'Attitudes Regarding Social Networking and Implications for Managers.

Radiol Manage 2014 Nov;36(6):23-29

Social networking has both positive and negative implications and can be an excellent communication and networking tool or it can have detrimental consequences. Healthcare workers, including radiologic technologists, need to be aware of the possible impli- cations of their online postings. Radiologic technologists are extensively using and accessing social media sites and should have appropriate profes- sional boundaries. Radiology administrators should assure that technologists are aware of policies related to social networking. Employee education regarding negative implica- tions may prove helpful; creating a radi- ology department with sound ethical standards.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 2014

Patient safety perceptions among vascular interventional technologists.

J Allied Health 2013 ;42(2):106-11

Department of Radiation Sciences, Virginia Commonwealth University, 701 West Grace Street, Box 843057, Richmond, VA 23284-3057, USA.

Objective: To describe perceptions of patient safety culture (PSC) among US vascular interventional technologists (VIR).

Methods: A letter to complete The Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture online was distributed in the US to all full-time American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT)-registered technologists with a primary discipline of cardiac-interventional or vascular interventional (n=3,184). Mean scores on each PSC dimension and overall outcome measures were calculated.

Results: The response rate was 13.7% (n=437) for the entire universe of ARRT-registered VIR technologists working full-time. Overall, respondents ranked the following dimensions as supporting patient safety within their respective institution: supervisor/manager promotion of patient safety, staffing, hospital handoffs/transitions, and teamwork within units. Neutral perceptions focused on teamwork across hospital units, hospital management's support for patient safety, and nonpunitive response to errors.

Conclusion: For this population, teamwork across hospital units and administrative support for a culture of safety should be addressed. With almost 20' of respondents rating their institutions with an overall safety grade of C or below, there is clearly a need for further investigation of patient safety issues within VIR departments to confirm these findings and to expand the scope of inquiry to other radiologic science professionals.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
October 2013

Safety matters.

Radiol Technol 2013 Mar-Apr;84(4):434-6

California State University, Long Beach, USA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 2013

What is the big deal about student supervision?

Radiol Technol 2012 Nov-Dec;84(2):196-8

California State University, Long Beach, CA, USA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
April 2013

Survey research.

Authors:
Laura Aaron

Radiol Technol 2012 Nov-Dec;84(2):190-2

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
April 2013

Academic dishonesty and unprofessional behavior.

Radiol Technol 2011 Nov-Dec;83(2):133-40

Radiologic Sciences Program, Northwestern State University, Shreveport, Louisiana, USA.

Purpose: To investigate differences in radiologic science student and faculty perceptions of academic dishonesty and unprofessional behavior.

Methods: Radiologic science faculty and students were questioned about their perceptions of academic dishonesty and unprofessional behavior using ethical scenarios in an electronic survey format.

Results: Significant differences occurred between faculty and student values regarding the seriousness of cheating and unprofessional behaviors. Faculty viewed cheating and unprofessional behaviors as more serious than students. Faculty and student self-reports of cheating behavior demonstrated no significant differences; however, significant differences existed in self-reported incidences of unprofessional behavior.

Conclusion: Faculty and students differed in their values and participation related to cheating and unprofessional behaviors. Efforts should be directed toward bridging the gap between faculty and student perceptions.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
April 2012

Revising student papers for publication.

Radiol Technol 2011 Jul-Aug;82(6):574-5

Northwestern State University in Shreveport, Louisiana, USA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
December 2011

Mixed methods research.

Authors:
Laura Aaron

Radiol Technol 2011 Jan-Feb;82(3):274-5

Northwestern State University in Shreveport, Louisiana, USA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
July 2011

If you use it, cite it.

Radiol Technol 2009 Sep-Oct;81(1):88-9

Division of Radiologic Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 2009

Writing a literature review article.

Authors:
Laura Aaron

Radiol Technol 2008 Nov-Dec;80(2):185-6

Northwestern State University in Shreveport, Louisiana, USA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
February 2009

Nonprogrammatic accreditation: programs and attitudes.

Radiol Technol 2008 Nov-Dec;80(2):123-9

Northwestern State University in Shreveport, Louisiana, USA.

Background: Radiologic science programs subscribe to regional or programmatic accreditation or both. Decisions regarding the type of accreditation a program holds are based on many factors.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to survey program directors from programs that do not subscribe to Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT) accreditation to examine their attitudes regarding programmatic accreditation and compare them with the literature findings.

Method: A researcher-designed survey was mailed to all non-JRCERT radiologic science programs in the United States based on the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) database of programs. A total of 70 surveys were mailed out, and 58% were returned.

Results: Of the programs responding to the survey, 80% were associate degree programs, 17% baccalaureate degree and 3% certificate. The most common reasons cited by program directors for not subscribing to programmatic accreditation were cost, issues with the accrediting agency and time. The most frequent reasons for considering programmatic accreditation were decreased cost and being required to do so by the ARRT.

Conclusion: Overall results indicated some concern regarding programmatic accreditation; although there were concerns, benefits for programmatic accreditation also were expressed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
February 2009

How does peer review work?

Authors:
Laura Aaron

Radiol Technol 2008 Jul-Aug;79(6):553-4

Radiologic Science Program, Northwestern State University, Shreveport, Louisiana, USA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 2008

Program director satisfaction with leadership skills.

Authors:
Laura Aaron

Radiol Technol 2006 Nov-Dec;78(2):104-12

Radiologic Technology Program, Northwestern State University, Shreveport, USA.

Context: Educators in radiologic technology help students mature into health care professionals; however, not all educators receive formal training in education. The majority of radiologic technology educators train first as practitioners and later become educators.

Objective: Identify areas for professional development and effective methods to learn leadership skills.

Methods: Radiologic technology program directors from Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT) accredited programs were surveyed and interviewed to determine their level of satisfaction with their leadership skills.

Results: Results indicate program directors are satisfied with most of their leadership skills. Budget and resources, conflict resolution and communication were identified as areas for improvement. Program directors identified workshops and lectures as their preferred method of learning leadership skills.

Summary: Program directors need to use a variety of skills for the successful operation of their programs. Even though results from this study indicate that radiologic technology program directors were satisfied overall with their leadership skills, there were areas that could use improvement.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
February 2007
-->