Publications by authors named "Lambertus H Aarts"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Sharing data on DNA transfer, persistence, prevalence and recovery: Arguments for harmonization and standardization.

Forensic Sci Int Genet 2018 11 21;37:260-269. Epub 2018 Sep 21.

Office of the Chief Forensic Scientist, Victoria Police Forensic Services Department, 31 Forensic Drive, Macleod, Vic, 3085, Australia; School of Molecular Sciences, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Vic, 3086, Australia.

Sharing data between forensic scientists on DNA transfer, persistence, prevalence and recovery (TPPR) is crucial to advance the understanding of these issues in the criminal justice community. We present the results of a collaborative exercise on reporting forensic genetics findings given activity level propositions. This exercise outlined differences in the methodology that was applied by the participating laboratories, as well as limitations to the use of published data on DNA TPPR. We demonstrate how publication of experimental results in scientific journals can be further improved to allow for an adequate use of these data. Steps that can be taken to share and use these data for research and casework purposes are outlined, and the prospects for future sharing of data through publicly accessible databases are discussed. This paper also explores potential avenues to proceed with implementation and is intended to fuel the discussion on sharing data pertaining to DNA TPPR issues. It is further suggested that international standardization and harmonization on these topics will benefit the forensic DNA community as it has been achieved in the past with the harmonization of STR typing systems.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fsigen.2018.09.006DOI Listing
November 2018

Viral insertion in Evi12 causes expression of aberrant Grp94 mRNAs containing the viral gag myristylation motif.

Virology 2007 Sep 1;366(2):227-33. Epub 2007 Jun 1.

Department of Hematology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Dr. Molewaterplein 50, 3015 GE Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Ecotropic Virus Integration site 12 (Evi12) is a common virus insertion site (cVIS) in retrovirally induced murine models of leukemia and lymphoma, suggesting an important role for this locus in these hematopoietic disorders. Evi12 is located near the promoter of the ER chaperone protein and Hsp90 family member Grp94. Here we show that viral insertion in Evi12 results in the expression of aberrant Grp94 transcripts in Cas-Br-MuLV as well as in AKXD induced hematopoietic tumors, demonstrating that Grp94 is a common viral target gene. While most transcripts encode for truncated forms of Grp94, transcripts containing viral gag sequences were detected in the leukemia cell line NFS107. Interestingly, these fusion transcripts encode for myristylated viral-Grp94 fusion proteins that localize to the plasma membrane. Combined with recent evidence that myristylated forms of Hsp90 transform cells, our data suggest that myristylation of target genes may be an important mechanism in retrovirally mediated oncogenesis. Since retroviral insertion in Evi12 also affects the expression of a recently identified novel gene Grp94 neighboring nucleotidase (Gnn), located at the other side of Evi12, it appears that proviral insertion can lead to deregulation of two genes present in the same locus.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.virol.2007.04.026DOI Listing
September 2007

Suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 controls lysosomal routing of G-CSF receptor.

EMBO J 2007 Apr 15;26(7):1782-93. Epub 2007 Mar 15.

Department of Hematology, Erasmus University Medical Center, 3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

The hematopoietic system provides an attractive model for studying growth factor-controlled expansion and differentiation of cells in relation to receptor routing and its consequences for signal transduction. Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins regulate receptor signaling partly via their ubiquitin ligase (E3)-recruiting SOCS box domain. Whether SOCS proteins affect signaling through modulating intracellular trafficking of receptors is unknown. Here, we show that a juxtamembrane lysine residue (K632) of the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor (G-CSFR) plays a key role in receptor routing and demonstrate that the effects of SOCS3 on G-CSF signaling to a major extent depend on this lysine. Mutation of K632 causes accumulation of G-CSFR in early endosomes and leads to sustained activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 and ERK, but not protein kinase B. Myeloid progenitors expressing G-CSFR mutants lacking K632 show a perturbed proliferation/differentiation balance in response to G-CSF. This is the first demonstration of SOCS-mediated ubiquitination and routing of a cytokine receptor and its impact on maintaining an appropriate signaling output.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.emboj.7601640DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1847666PMC
April 2007

G-CSF receptor truncations found in SCN/AML relieve SOCS3-controlled inhibition of STAT5 but leave suppression of STAT3 intact.

Blood 2004 Aug 6;104(3):667-74. Epub 2004 Apr 6.

Institute of Hematology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Truncated granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptors (G-CSF-Rs) are implicated in severe congenital neutropenia (SCN) and the consecutive development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Mice expressing G-CSF-R truncation mutants (gcsfr-d715) show defective receptor internalization, an increased signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5)/STAT3 activation ratio, and hyperproliferative responses to G-CSF treatment. We determined whether a lack of negative feedback by suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins contributes to the signaling abnormalities of G-CSF-R-d715. Expression of SOCS3 transcripts in bone marrow cells from G-CSF-treated gcsfr-d715 mice was approximately 60% lower than in wild-type (WT) littermates. SOCS3 efficiently suppressed STAT3 and STAT5 activation by WT G-CSF-R in luciferase reporter assays. In contrast, while SOCS3 still inhibited STAT3 activation by G-CSF-R-d715, STAT5 activation was no longer affected. This was due mainly to loss of the SOCS3 recruitment site Tyr729, with an additional contribution of the internalization defects of G-CSF-R-d715. Because Tyr729 is also a docking site for the Src homology 2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP-2), which binds to and inactivates STAT5, we suggest a model in which reduced SOCS3 expression, combined with the loss of recruitment of both SOCS3 and SHP-2 to the activated receptor complex, determine the increased STAT5/STAT3 activation ratio and the resulting signaling abnormalities projected by truncated G-CSF-R mutants.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood-2003-08-2913DOI Listing
August 2004

Receptor activation and 2 distinct COOH-terminal motifs control G-CSF receptor distribution and internalization kinetics.

Blood 2004 Jan 25;103(2):571-9. Epub 2003 Sep 25.

Institute of Hematology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

We have studied the intracellular distribution and internalization kinetics of the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor (G-CSF-R) in living cells using fusion constructs of wild-type or mutant G-CSF-R and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Under steady-state conditions the G-CSF-R localized predominantly to the Golgi apparatus, late endosomes, and lysosomes, with only low expression on the plasma membrane, resulting from spontaneous internalization. Internalization of the G-CSF-R was significantly accelerated by addition of G-CSF. This ligand-induced switch from slow to rapid internalization required the presence of G-CSF-R residue Trp650, previously shown to be essential for its signaling ability. Both spontaneous and ligand-induced internalization depended on 2 distinct amino acid stretches in the G-CSF-R COOH-terminus: 749-755, containing a dileucine internalization motif, and 756-769. Mutation of Ser749 at position -4 of the dileucine motif to Ala significantly reduced the rate of ligand-induced internalization. In contrast, mutation of Ser749 did not affect spontaneous G-CSF-R internalization, suggesting the involvement of a serine-threonine kinase specifically in ligand-accelerated internalization of the G-CSF-R. COOH-terminal truncation mutants of G-CSF-R, found in severe congenital neutropenia, lack the internalization motifs and were completely defective in both spontaneous and ligand-induced internalization. As a result, these mutants showed constitutively high cell-surface expression.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood-2003-07-2250DOI Listing
January 2004
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