Publications by authors named "Laila Aardal"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Exposure and airway effects of seafood industry workers in northern Norway.

J Occup Environ Med 2005 May;47(5):482-92

Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital Northern Norway, Tromsoe, Norway.

Objective: In this study, we explored airway symptoms and exposure to bioaerosols and exhaust gases in seafood industry plants.

Methods: The study details the results from personal and environmental exposure measurements (17 plants), a questionnaire (n = 984), and clinical examinations (n = 225).

Results: The workers were exposed to allergens, endotoxins, molds, and exhaust. The 1-year prevalence of work-related airway symptoms was 42.8% for production workers and 25.9% for administrative workers. Mean levels of forced expiratory volume in 1 second and forced vital capacity were less than the predicted values in all exposed nonsmoker groups. A total of 20.5% had increased levels of total IgE (>/=100 kU/L). Specific IgE-mediated reactions seemed to be relevant only in the shrimp industry.

Conclusions: Seafood industry workers showed a high prevalence of work-related airway symptoms. Further research on the relationship between exposure and effects is necessary.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.jom.0000161732.96555.2bDOI Listing
May 2005

Feeling cold at work increases the risk of symptoms from muscles, skin, and airways in seafood industry workers.

Am J Ind Med 2005 Jan;47(1):65-71

Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital Northern Norway, Tromsoe, Norway.

Background: Norwegian workers in seafood industry plants are exposed to a cold and often wet environment.

Methods: 1,767 seafood industry workers participated in a questionnaire study. Seventeen plants were visited for thermal measurements.

Results: 15.9% of industrial workers and 1.7% of administrative workers reported that they often felt cold at work. Mean finger temperatures after 1 hr work varied between 16 and 22 degrees C. Foot temperature dropped from morning measurement until lunch time in 85% of the measurements. Industrial workers who reported that they often felt cold, had significantly increased prevalence of symptoms from muscles, skin, and airways while working, compared to workers who reported that they never felt cold at work.

Conclusions: Moderate cooling, caused by a cold indoor working environment, may increase muscle-, airway-, and skin symptoms. The prevalence of feeling cold may be a useful exposure estimate in moderate cold exposure situations.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.20109DOI Listing
January 2005
-->