Publications by authors named "Klaudia Stangel-Wojcikiewicz"

24 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The Potential of Asiatic Acid in the Reversion of Cyclophosphamide-Induced Hemorrhagic Cystitis in Rats.

Int J Mol Sci 2021 May 29;22(11). Epub 2021 May 29.

Clinic of General, Oncological and Functional Urology, Medical University of Warsaw, Lindleya 4, 02-005 Warsaw, Poland.

The purpose of this study was to determine if asiatic acid may act efficiently in the model of cyclophosphamide (CYP)-induced cystitis in rats. We performed experiments after administration of CYP (single dose 200 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), asiatic acid (30 mg/kg/day for 14 consecutive days, by oral gavage), or CYP plus asiatic acid, during which conscious cystometry, measurements of urothelium thickness and bladder edema, as well as selected biomarkers analyses were conducted. In rats that received asiatic acid together with CYP, a drop in bladder basal pressure, detrusor overactivity index, non-voiding contraction amplitude, non-voiding contraction frequency, and the area under the pressure curve were observed, when compared to the CYP group. Furthermore, a significant increase in threshold pressure, voided volume, intercontraction interval, bladder compliance, and volume threshold to elicit NVC were found in that group accordingly. Administration of the asiatic acid successfully restored concentrations of biomarkers both in bladder urothelium (BDNF, CGRP, OCT-3, IL-1β, IL-6, NGF, nitrotyrosine, malondialdehyde, TNF-α, SV2A, SNAP23, SNAP25, PAC-1, ORM1, occludin, IGFBP-3, HB-EGF, T-H protein, Z01, and HPX) and detrusor muscle (Rho kinase and VAChT) in CYP-treated rats. Finally, asiatic acid significantly decreased urothelium thickness and bladder oedema. Asiatic acid proved to be a potent and effective drug in the rat model of CYP-induced cystitis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms22115853DOI Listing
May 2021

The Urogynecology Section of the Polish Society of Gynecologists and Obstetricians guidelines on the management of non-neurogenic overactive bladder syndrome in women.

Ginekol Pol 2021 ;92(3):236-251

Department of Operative Gynecology and Gynecologic Oncology, I Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Medical University of Lodz, Poland.

Objectives: The aim of the publication was to present the interdisciplinary guidelines of the Urogynecology Section of the Polish Society of Gynecologists and Obstetricians (PSGO) for the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB) syndrome based on the available literature, expert knowledge, and everyday practice.

Material And Methods: A review of the literature, including current recommendations for the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome, urinary incontinence, urgency and mixed urinary incontinence, as well as the earlier recommendations of the PSGO Urogynecology Section, was conducted.

Results: Management of the patients with OAB is presented. Four lines of therapy were identified: 1) educating the patient, behavioral therapy with pelvic floor muscle training, 2) pharmacotherapy, 3) botulinum toxin injection and tibial nerve stimulation; and sacral nerve stimulation even though so far it has been used only in selected populations, 4) surgical intervention. The literature reports which provided supporting evidence and presented various aspects of the therapy were discussed. OAB pharmacotherapy-related issues which are vital in everyday clinical practice were presented.

Conclusions: A systematic review of the available guidelines and an analysis of OAB (including urgency urinary incontinence) management were conducted. The Polish Society of Gynecologists and Obstetricians issued the guidelines for the therapeutic management of OAB patients. The need for an individualized approach was emphasized.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5603/GP.2021.0046DOI Listing
January 2021

The Urogynecology Section of the Polish Society of Gynecologists and Obstetricians Guideline on the use of urodynamic testing in gynecological practice.

Ginekol Pol 2021 ;92(3):230-235

Department of Operative Gynecology and Gynecological Oncology, I Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Medical University of Lodz, Poland.

Objectives: The aim was to present an interdisciplinary Guideline of the Urogynecology Section of the Polish Society of Gynecologists and Obstetricians (PSGO) for the use of urodynamics (UDS) in the diagnostic process of patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) based on the available literature, expert knowledge, and everyday practice.

Material And Methods: A review of the literature concerning the use of UDS in women, including current international guidelines and earlier recommendations of the PSGO Urogynecology Section, was conducted.

Results: Urodynamic testing allows to make the urodynamic diagnosis which, nevertheless, remains to be the preliminary diagnosis. Medical history, physical examination, and detailed analysis of the previous test results (laboratory, imaging, endoscopic) need to be taken into consideration before making the final diagnosis. Urodynamic testing before surgical treatment of SUI is allowable, but the decision remains at the discretion of the physician. Urodynamic testing is not necessary before primary surgical treatment of uncomplicated SUI, but it has been demonstrated to optimize the therapeutic methods in complicated SUI. The significance of UDS in the diagnostic process of patients with overactive bladder symptoms, voiding dysfunction, and bladder outlet obstruction was discussed.

Conclusions: Urodynamic testing is a vital element of the urogynecological diagnostic process. The scope of UDS should reflect the individual needs and symptoms of each patient and be based on the current guidelines, expert knowledge and experience of the physician, indications, and eligibility, as well as additional test results of the affected patients. Due to formal and legal requirements, PSGO, in this Guideline, wishes to emphasize the need for an individualized approach to both, test performance and result interpretation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5603/GP.2021.0045DOI Listing
January 2021

The Potential of Novel Chitosan-Based Scaffolds in Pelvic Organ Prolapse (POP) Treatment through Tissue Engineering.

Molecules 2020 Sep 18;25(18). Epub 2020 Sep 18.

Gynecology and Oncology Department Jagiellonian University Collegium Medicum, Kopernika 23, 31-501 Kraków, Poland.

The growing number of female reproductive system disorders creates a need for novel treatment methods. Tissue engineering brings hope for patients, which enables damaged tissue reconstruction. For this purpose, epithelial cells are cultured on three-dimensional scaffolds. One of the most promising materials is chitosan, which is known for its biocompatibility and biodegradability. The aim of the following study was to verify the potential of chitosan-based biomaterials for pelvic organ prolapse regeneration. The scaffolds were obtained under microwave-assisted conditions in crosslinking reactions, using dicarboxylic acids and aminoacid as crosslinkers, including l-glutamic acid, adipic acid, malonic acid, and levulinic acid. The products were characterized over their physicochemical and biological properties. FT-IR analysis confirmed formation of amide bonds. The scaffolds had a highly porous structure, which was confirmed by SEM analysis. Their porosity was above 90%. The biomaterials had excellent swelling abilities and very good antioxidant properties. The cytotoxicity study was performed on vaginal epithelial VK2/E6E7 and human colon cancer HCT116 cell lines. The results showed that after certain modifications, the proposed scaffolds could be used in pelvic organ prolapse (POP) treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/molecules25184280DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7571131PMC
September 2020

The influence of nebivolol on the activity of BRL 37344 - the β3-adrenergic receptor agonist, in the animal model of detrusor overactivity.

Neurourol Urodyn 2019 06 1;38(5):1229-1240. Epub 2019 Apr 1.

Chair and Department of Applied Pharmacy, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland.

Aims: The cardiotoxic effects of antimuscarinics constitute a significant restriction in their application in elderly people. Overactive bladder syndrome pharmacotherapy using compounds with cardioprotective properties would seem an ideal solution. The main goal of the study was to assess the impacts of nebivolol (NEB) on the activity of BRL 37344 - β3-adrenergic receptor (β3AR) agonist, in the animal model of detrusor overactivity. As both these substances can impact on the cardiovascular system, their effect on the parameters of this system and diuresis was also examined.

Methods: Retinyl acetate (RA; 0.75%) solution was used to induce detrusor overactivity in female Wistar rats. BRL and/or NEB were administered intra-arterially during cystometry in a single dose (2.5 or 5, 0.05 or 0.1 mg/kg, respectively). In addition, a 24 hours measurement of heart rate, blood pressure, and urine production was carried out.

Results: NEB (0.05 mg/kg) and BRL (2.5 mg/kg) monotherapy proved to have no influence on the cystometric parameters of animals with RA-induced detrusor overactivity. NEB at 0.1 mg/kg resulted in a drop in the detrusor overactivity index, similarly to BRL at 5 mg/kg. Coadministration of NEB and BRL, both at ineffective doses, decreased the detrusor overactivity index and ameliorated the nonvoiding contractions. β3AR stimulation proved to induce tachycardia and hypertension. NEB at 0.05 mg/kg proved to ameliorate detrusor overactivity and have preventive properties against adverse cardiovascular effects of the β3AR agonist.

Conclusions: The combined application of the β3AR agonist and NEB may improve detrusor overactivity without affecting the heart rate, blood pressure, and urine production.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/nau.23993DOI Listing
June 2019

Cancer survivorship issues with radiation and hemorrhagic cystitis in gynecological malignancies.

Int Urol Nephrol 2018 Oct 21;50(10):1745-1751. Epub 2018 Aug 21.

Department of Gynecology and Oncology, Collegium Medicum Jagiellonian University of Kraków, Kraków, Poland.

Purpose: Given that more cancers are being diagnosed earlier and that treatment of cancer is improving, health issues of cancer survivors are becoming more common and apparent. Pelvic radiation therapy for the treatment of gynecological cancers can lead to long-term collateral damage to the bladder, a condition termed radiation cystitis (RC). Late sequelae may take many years to develop and include incontinence and pain as well as hematuria. RC is a rare but potentially life-threatening condition for which there are few management and treatment options.

Methods: There are limited data in the literature regarding the effects of radiation on the bladder after gynecological cancer therapy and we hereby review the literature on cancer survivorship issues of pelvic radiation for gynecology literature.

Results: Treatment options are available for patients with radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis. However, most treatments are risky or only effective for a short timeframe and no therapy is currently available to reverse the disease progress. Furthermore, no standardized guidelines exist describing preferred management options. Common therapies include hyperbaric oxygen therapy, clot evacuation, fulguration, intravesical instillation of astringent agents, and surgery. Novel developing strategies include Botulinum Toxin injections and liposomal-tacrolimus instillations. These treatments and strategies are discussed.

Conclusions: In this review, we will present current and advanced therapeutic strategies for RC to help cancer survivors deal with long-term bladder health issues.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11255-018-1970-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6487476PMC
October 2018

Regenerative medicine- techniques and methods of administering autologous derived stem cells in urinary incontinence.

Ginekol Pol 2016 ;87(3):205-10

The aim of the work is to present regenerative medicine achievement as an alternative SUI treatment and the variety of injected cells type as well as injection techniques itself with the analysis of their quality and possible the mechanism in which they reduce urinary incontinence symptoms. For over a decade numerous authors declare use of different type of autologous mesenchymal-derived stem cells (AMDC) in male and female SUI. The leakage improvement reached 80%, despite the number of injected cells as well as the injection technique. Important subject in the AMDC treatment is the precise cell material injection into the selected spot which might be possible with the use of the endoscopic assisting robot. The robotic supported system for cells procedure might bring the missing percentage in reaching the goal in SUI treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.17772/gp/60973DOI Listing
July 2018

Quality of life assessment in female patients 2 and 4 years after muscle-derived cell transplants for stress urinary incontinence treatment.

Ginekol Pol 2016 ;87(3):183-9

Introduction: Regenerative medicine for the treatment of urinary incontinence has become a popular area of focus in the search for therapies for this disease. The paper focused on women's quality of life assessment who were subjected to transplantation of MDSC (autologous muscle derived stem cells) to the urethral sphincter.

Methods: The procedure was conducted in 16 female patients who completed the observation stage. Assessment of quality of life before and after the treatment (two and four years post-operation) was conducted based on the validated I-QOL questionnaire (the Polish language version).

Results: The questionnaire study showed that autologous cell therapy significantly improves quality of life in female patients suffering from stress urinary incontinence (SUI). The total I-QOL score increased from 49 (SD ± 7.7) before therapy to 77 (SD ± 5.4) two years post-operation. Four years after the procedure, quality of life remained at a higher level than before therapy, although quality of life decreased by several points when compared with the results from the two-year follow-up - 63 (SD ± 7.2). Patients reported significantly less concern related to their ability to reach the toilet to avoid incontinence, improved sleep at night, a higher level of satisfaction with life, and more satisfaction with their sexual lives (p<0.05).

Conclusion: The MDSC injection procedure for SUI treatment has significant improved quality of life in the majority of our patients in 2 and 4 year follow-up.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.17772/gp/61330DOI Listing
July 2018

Lower urinary tract symptoms, nocturia and overactive bladder in patients with depression and anxiety.

Psychiatr Pol 2016 ;50(2):417-30

Klinika Urologii UJ CM.

Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) remain highly prevalent worldwide, and are well known to negatively impact patients' quality of life, sleep and psychosocial wellbeing. Conversely, both depression and anxiety have been shown to have a negative effect on perception, development and prolongation of LUTS. This paper provides an overview of an association between the lower urinary tract symptoms, depression and anxiety. It also explores possible common mechanisms underlying the causes of both conditions. There has been a large body of evidence linking LUTS with anxiety and/or depression. Studies have documented not only a significant impact of LUTS on the psychosocial wellbeing, but also showed a strong negative effect of depression and anxiety on perception, development and prolongation of LUTS. High level of psychiatric morbidity has important implications on the appropriate management in patients with LUTS, as well as LUTS may have important implications on development and management of depression and anxiety. Therefore, clinicians should be aware of the bidirectional association between LUTS and anxiety and/or depression, as some patients may require a multidisciplinary approach and a combined treatment. The precise common mechanism underlying LUTS, depression and anxiety remain largely unknown and further research is needed to elucidate the underlying pathophysiological pathways.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.12740/PP/OnlineFirst/59162DOI Listing
April 2017

[The role of cytologic-colposcopic diagnostics in qualification to LEEP (loop electrical excision procedure)].

Przegl Lek 2016;73(7):472-8

Loop electrosurgical excision procedurę (LEEP) is both a diagnostic and a therapeutic method in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). The key for the therapeutic effect is accurate diagnostics, in particular precise colposcopic localisation of CIN in the cervical area. It enables localising a lesion highly suspected of neoplasmatic character, excising a sample for histopathologic examination and making a pre-therapeutical diagnosis, as well as choosing optimal way of treatment. Colposcopic examination conducted in 115 women with inapropriate cytologic exam, i.e. HGSIL, revealed CIN-suspected image in all cases. Highly positive and statistically relevant correlation between results of colposcopic examination and histologial examination of samples excised with the use of high frequency electrosurgical loop in examined group was stated. Due to its efficiency, easy implementation, great tolerance and wide acceptance the procedure is widespread.
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May 2018

[Pregnancy and labor after fertility-sparing surgical management of cervical cancer].

Ginekol Pol 2015 Sep;86(9):700-5

Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate the possibility of conception and the course of pregnancy in women with cervical cancer (FIGO IA and IB1), who underwent fertility-sparing surgical management, i.e. surgical conization or radical vaginal trachelectomy with laparoscopic lymphadenectomy.

Material And Methods: A total of 80 patients treated surgically due to cervical cancer constituted the study group. Out of them, 65 (85%) women underwent surgical conization (43--FIGO IA1 and 25--FIGO IA2), and 12 (15%) women underwent radical vaginal trachelectomy with laparoscopic lymphadenectomy (9--FIGO IA2 and 3--FIGO lB1). Cervical cerciage was performed in all patients after trachelectomy.

Results: A total of 52 (76.5%) women after surgical conization successfully conceived. Out of them, 3 (5.8)% women miscarried (1 before 12 and 2 between 12-22 weeks of gestation), 2 (3.8%) delivered pre-term (at 26 and 34 weeks of gestation), and 47 (90.4%) delivered at term, including 5 (10.2%) cesarean deliveries, 1 (2.0%) vaginal delivery with the use of the Bracht Manoeuve; and 43 (87.8%) normal vaginal deliveries. Six (50.0%) women after radical vaginal trachelectomy successfully conceived. Out of them, 1 (16.7%) woman miscarried (at 19 weeks of gestation), 2 (33.3%) delivered pre-term (between 22-32 weeks of gestation), and 3 (50%) delivered at term, including 1 (20%) vaginal delivery at 25 weeks of gestation and 4 (80%) cesarean deliveries (1 at 29 weeks of gestation and 3 at term).

Conclusions: Fertility-sparing surgical management in subjects with early-stage cervical carcinoma, provided the patients have been properly qualified for the procedure, allows a significant number of the affected women to conceive, have a normal pregnancy and delivery
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September 2015

Current interventional management of male stress urinary incontinence following urological procedures.

Cent European J Urol 2015 26;68(3):340-7. Epub 2015 Sep 26.

Department of Urology, Collegium Medicum at the Jagiellonian University, Cracow, Poland.

Introduction: Despite improvements in surgical techniques and implementation of minimally invasive procedures, male stress urinary incontinence affects a substantial number of patients after prostatic surgery. In response to increasing demand of optimal treatment modality, new alternatives to artificial urinary sphincter have recently been introduced. This review summarises the therapeutic surgical options with their outcomes in management of postprostatectomy stress incontinence.

Material And Methods: We performed a literature review by searching the PubMed, Web of Science and Embase databases for articles published from January 2000 until April 2015 based on clinical relevance.

Results: Artificial urinary sphincter is currently considered the "gold standard" treatment of male stress urinary incontinence. Although the new devices in this group have recently been investigated, the AMS 800 remains the only widely used implant. Male slings and adjustable continence devices, achieve the social continence rates up to 60%. Periurethral injections of bulking agents, have limited efficacy of male stress incontinence. Argus sling and ProACT are both associated with substantial explantation rates. Stem cell therapy is a promising option but still requires additional testing.

Conclusions: The development of new alternatives to artificial urinary sphincter is constantly progressing. Although recently introduced minimally invasive treatment options have not yet surpassed the outcomes of the artificial urinary sphincter they should continue to be evaluated and compared against the gold standard.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5173/ceju.2015.616DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4643709PMC
November 2015

Barriers in entering treatment among women with urinary incontinence.

Ginekol Pol 2014 May;85(5):342-7

Objective: The aim of the study was to identify barriers in help seeking behaviors among women with urinary incontinence UI.

Materials And Methods: The study was performed using the method of diagnostic enquiry by means of questionnaire and interview among two groups of patients. The first group of women aged 47-79 years consisted of 80 members of the Association of People with Urinary Incontinence "Uroconti". The second group included 61 females aged 26-81 years admitted to the Urodynamic Laboratory of Gynecology and Oncology Clinic at the University Hospital in Krakow.

Results: Patients with stress urinary incontinence (SUI) reported to the doctor on average after 4 years, patients with urgency urinary incontinence (UUI), after 3 years, patients with a mixed form of urinary incontinence (MUI), after 6 years, and with overflow incontinence, after 10 years from the appearance of first symptoms. Anxiety shame, the conviction that symptoms of UI are a normal age related state, as well as the conviction that the symptoms are temporary significantly affected the delay in seeking medical consultation. Most of the surveyed women made the decision to undertake treatment themselves, and their main motive was the escalation of symptoms. The majority (89.4%) of women surveyed alleviated the symptoms of urinary incontinence without the help of a doctor sometimes using methods detrimental to their health.

Conclusion: The identification of help seeking barriers and reaching out to risk groups is essential for early diagnose and effective treatment of women with urinary incontinence.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.17772/gp/1734DOI Listing
May 2014

Efficient myoblast expansion for regenerative medicine use.

Int J Mol Med 2014 Jul 30;34(1):83-91. Epub 2014 Apr 30.

Department of Transplantation, Polish-American Institute of Pediatrics, Jagiellonian University School of Medicine, 30‑663 Cracow, Poland.

Cellular therapy using expanded autologous myoblasts is a treatment modality for a variety of diseases. In the present study, we compared the commercial skeletal muscle cell growth medium-2 (SKGM-2) with a medium designed by our group for the expansion of skeletal myoblasts. The use of an in-house medium [DMEM/F12 medium supplemented with EGF, bFGF, HGF, insulin and dexamethasone (DFEFH)] resulted in a greater number of myoblast colonies (>50%) and a 3-, 4- and 9‑fold higher proliferation rate, eventually resulting in a 3-, 7- and 87-fold greater number of cells at the 1st, 2nd and 3rd passage, respectively, compared with the cells grown in SKGM-2 medium. The average CD56 expression level was higher in the myoblasts cultured in DFEFH than in those culturd in SKGM-2 medium. At the 3rd passage, lower expression levels of myostatin and considerably higher expression levels of myogenin were observed in the cells that were grown in DFEFH medium. The results of our study indicated that myoblasts cultured in both medium types displayed fusogenic potential at the 3rd passage. Furthermore, it was shown that cells cultured in DFEFH medium created myotubes with a considerably higher number of nuclei. Additionally, we observed that the fusion potential of the cells markedly decreased with the subsequent passages and that the morphology of the myoblasts differed between the 2 cultured media. Our data demonstrate that culture in the DFEFH medium leads to an approximately 90‑fold greater number of myoblasts, with improved morphology and greater fusion potential, compared with culture in the commercial SKGM-2 medium.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3892/ijmm.2014.1763DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4072397PMC
July 2014

Transrectal ultrasound-guided hysteroscopic myomectomy of submucosal myomas with a varying degree of myometrial penetration.

J Minim Invasive Gynecol 2013 Sep-Oct;20(5):672-85. Epub 2013 Jul 11.

Department of Gynecology and Oncology, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland. Electronic address:

Study Objective: To predict the 1-step complete resection rate after transrectal ultrasound-guided hysteroscopic myomectomy and to determine the usefulness of intraoperative transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS) in monitoring hysteroscopic electroresection of submucosal myomas.

Design: Prospective cohort study (Canadian Task Force classification II-1).

Setting: University hospital.

Patients: One hundred twenty women with symptomatic (abnormal uterine bleeding or reproductive disorder), single, submucosal myomas underwent hysteroscopic electroresection. Groups 1 and 2 were monitored, respectively, with or without TRUS. Anatomical inclusion criteria were myoma ≤5 cm and myometrial free margin ≥3 mm above the myoma.

Interventions: Myomas were evaluated preoperatively via sonohysterograpy and were graded according to the guidelines outlined by the European Society of Hysteroscopy (ESH), including size and myometrial free margin, and according to the STEPW (size, topography, extension, penetration, and lateral wall) classification. On the basis of sonographic findings, patients with myomas >3 cm received gonadotropin-releasing hormone therapy for 1 to 3 months. Hysteroscopic myomectomy was performed with or without TRUS guidance. At 4 to 8 weeks after the initial procedure, postoperative transvaginal ultrasonography, sonohysterography, or second-look hysteroscopy was performed.

Measurements And Main Results: In the TRUS group, a significantly higher percentage of 1-step complete resections was observed than in the group without TRUS (91% vs 73%) (p = .02). This was associated with a statistically significant difference in the subgroups of myomas that were deeply penetrating into the myometrium (89% vs 55%) (p < .01). One-way logistic analysis of data for all treated patients indicated the use of TRUS, as well as the ESH and STEPW classifications, as significant factors influencing the 1-step complete resection. At multivariable logistic regression analysis, use of TRUS (odds ratio [OR], 2.74; p < .001), myomas graded 0 or 1 according to ESH (OR, 3.55; p < .001), and size <3 cm (OR, 2.35; p < .05) were significantly associated with 1-step complete resection (area under the curve, 0.80; p < .001). In the TRUS group there were two significant predictors: size <3 cm (OR = 5.21; p < .05) and myometrial free margin <5 mm (OR, 0.18; p < .05).

Conclusion: Intraoperative use of TRUS during hysteroscopic myomectomy increases the chance of complete 1-step removal of submucosal myomas that deeply penetrate the myometrium.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmig.2013.05.001DOI Listing
May 2014

Autologous muscle-derived cells for the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence: a 2-year follow-up of a Polish investigation.

Neurourol Urodyn 2014 Mar 19;33(3):324-30. Epub 2013 Apr 19.

Department of Gynaecology and Oncology, Jagiellonian University Collegium Medicum, Cracow, Poland.

Aims: We evaluated the safety, feasibility and initial effects of therapy with muscle-derived cells (MDCs) for women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI).

Methods: MDCs were isolated from an upper-arm muscle biopsy from 16 women with SUI. Cells were isolated by enzymatic digestion and expanded in vitro for 8-10 weeks. A quantity of 0.6-25 × 10(6) of the obtained cells were injected transurethrally into the urethral rhabdosphincter of women under local anesthesia. The cells were placed circumferentially at the 9, 12, and 3 O'clock positions with endoscopic guidance.

Results: The initial results of the treatment of SUI with adult muscle-derived stem cells demonstrate the safety and feasibility of using these cells. The 2-year follow-up revealed a 75% success rate, with some patients achieving complete improvement (50%) and some patients achieving partial improvement (25%), suggesting that the prospects for this method are encouraging.

Conclusions: Stem cell therapy promises to become a minimally invasive method for the regeneration of the urethral rhabdosphincter muscle. Injecting a small number of cells does not preclude obtaining the desired therapeutic result.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/nau.22404DOI Listing
March 2014

[Evaluation of the recurrence and residual lesions incidence after loop electroexcisional procedure and cold knife conisation].

Przegl Lek 2012 ;69(9):658-62

Katedra Ginekologii i Połoinictwa UJ CM, Kraków.

The aim of this paper was the evaluation of the recurrence and residual lesions of cervical intraepithelial neoplaisa (CIN) incidence after LEEP (loop electro excisional procedure) and cold knife conisation. The clinical material was 210 women aged 22-65 years of life referred to the Department of Gynecology and Oncology Jagiellonian University Medical College in Krakow, Poland, the period in 2000- 2005 years, with initial cytological pap diagnosis-HSIL. (high grade squamous intraepithelial lesion-HSIL) according to The Bethesda System. The study group was 115 women with colposcopically visible lesions, which was qualified to the LEEP procedure. The controls were 95 women, preoperatively diagnosed based on colposcopically directed biopsy of the ectocervix and cervical canal curettage. In all cases the recurrence of cervical dysplasia and residual disease of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia incidence were analyzed. The follow-up period was 5 years with Pap smear and colposcopy every 3 months, for the first 2 years and every 6 months in subsequent 3 years. In case of recurrence which was diagnosed within first 6 months the residual disease was assumed rather than recurrence one. Data were statistically analyzed. We conclude that the therapeutical effect depends on CIN (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia) localization within cervix, because in case of cervical canal localization the recurrence and residual disease percentage is significantly higher in comparision to the ectocervix localization. This is why the colposcopic precise localization of the lesion within cervix is of the great importance. The free margins of the removed tissue speciemen are also the important prognostic factor. Most of the recurrence are diagnosed within the first year after initial procedure and does not depend on the margins involvement.
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March 2013

Hormone replacement therapy regimens in chemotherapy-induced premature ovarian failure and the subsequent correction of hormone levels.

Neuro Endocrinol Lett 2012 ;33(7):697-702

Department of Gynecology and Oncology, Collegium Medium Jagiellonian University of Kraków, Poland.

Objectives: Premature ovarian failure (POF) is a consequence of gonadotoxic chemoradiotherapy given in antyneoplasia treatment. In young women it will correlate with menopausal symptoms which tend to appear due to depleted ovarian follicle reserve.

Design: It was a case series study that included women 18-50 years old who were treated for malignancy with gonadotoxic chemioradiotherapy. We have measured blood hormonal levels of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), estradiol (E2) and progesterone within one month of various hormone replacement therapy (HRT).

Results: We have observed different kind of hormonal reaction according to FSH, LH, estradiol and progesterone levels due to various hormonal replacement therapy. The administration of various HRT regimens presented with a decrease in the blood concentration of estradiol E2 and progesterone and a concomitant increase of FSH and LH. These findings demonstrate a shift to physiological ranges and a simultaneous improvement of symptoms associated with CI-POF.

Conclusions: The most appropriate therapy needs to be selected according to the patient's alleviation of symptoms and correction of blood hormone levels.
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April 2013

Prevalence of HPV-DNA in Pap smears containing ASC and AGC performed within Population Programme of Prophylaxis and Early Detection of Early Cervical Cancer.

Przegl Lek 2012 ;69(11):1189-93

Katedra Połoznictwa i Ginekologii, Klinika Ginekologii i Onkologii, Uniwersytet Jagielloński, Collegium Medicum, Kraków.

Aim: to assess the incidence of HPV -DNA in women with ASC/AGC compared to patients with normal Pap smears.

Material And Methods: The study group consisted of 242 women (207 ASC and 35 AGC cases). The control group counted 200 age-matched women with negative Pap smears. Cervical samples collected from all the participants were tested for the presence of HPV-DNA using the Hybrid Capture-2 test.

Results: Total HPV infection was significantly higher in the study than in the control group (43.0% vs.14.0%) (p=0.005). There was no difference in the incidence of HPV -DNA between ASC and AGC groups. Prevalence of HPV-DNA ASC-H was significantly higher in ASC-US group (83.3% vs. 40.5%) (p=0.004). HPV positive endometrial AGC significantly outnumbered HPV positive endocervical AGC (88.9% vs. 26.9%) (p=0.003). Similar trends were observed for the high-risk type of HPV (p<0.001).

Conclusions: The significant difference in HPV -DNA incidence between the study and control groups suggests that HPV plays a role in the development of ASC and AGC. The implementation of HPV testing in all women diagnosed with ASC or AGC can lead to tailored therapeutic management and more careful follow-up care.
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May 2013

Expression of vascular endothelial growth factors VEGF- C and D, VEGFR-3, and comparison of lymphatic vessels density labeled with D2-40 antibodies as a prognostic factors in vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN) and invasive vulvar cancer.

Neuro Endocrinol Lett 2011 ;32(4):530-9

Department of Obstetrics and Perinatology, Medical College of Jagiellonian University, Cracow University Hospital, Cracow, Poland.

Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the immunohistochemical expression of vascular endothelial growth factors VEGF-C and D, as well as the expression of VEGFR-3 in VIN and vulvar invasive cancer and to compare the density of lymphatic marker D2-40 antibody in both groups, and to compare them with different clinicopathologic features.

Materials & Methods: The study was performed using tissue material and clinical data from 100 women diagnosed with VIN and 100 women diagnosed with invasive vulvar cancer.

Results: No significant differences were found in the expression of VEGF-C and -D or VEGFR-3 between those patients with VIN and those with invasive vulvar cancers. Weak expression of VEGF-C was confirmed only in two cases of the analyzed series; in all cases, expression of VEGF-D and VEGFR-3 was observed. The strongest expression of VEGF-D and VEGFR-3 was observed in the group of invasive cancers. The highest density of lymphatic vessels per 2 mm was observed in VIN. In the cancer group, small lymphatic vessels with a narrow oval lumen were observed. Moreover, in two cases of vulvar cancer, the presence of intratumoral lymphatic vessels was observed.

Conclusions: These results suggest that lymphangiogenesis begins at the preinvasive stage of vulvar carcinogenesis and suggests the important role of VEGF-C, VEGF-D, VEGFR-3 and LV (D2-40) as prognostic factors in the process of carcinogenesis in the vulvar area.
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October 2011

[Risk factors of pelvic organ prolapsed in women qualified to reconstructive surgery--the Polish multicenter study].

Ginekol Pol 2010 Nov;81(11):821-7

II Katedra i Klinika Ginekologii UM w Lublinie.

Aim Of Study: To evaluate the prevalence rate of various pelvic floor disorders among patients treated in 8 academic centers in Poland due to pelvic organ prolapse (POP).

Material And Methods: The study group consisted of 717 women scheduled for reconstructive surgery due to POP. Risk factors, functional abnormalities along with symptoms affecting quality of life, were assessed by means of disease specific questionnaire. The stage of the disease was assessed after gynecological examination using POP-Q score.

Results: The mean age of affected women with POP was 61,25 years (median 61), and mean BMI--27.62 (median--27.29). 80% of women were menopausal. Mean time of symptoms related to disease was 65,6 months; whereas the time relapsed from first doctor diagnosis of POP to hospital admission was 50.6 months. 97.4% affected women were multiparous. Only 1.21% women with POP were nulliparous. Family history of prolapse was found in 13.4% of patients, whereas familial positive history of urinary incontinence was 10%. Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) among the analyzed group were as follows: frequency--almost 50%, urgency 32.2%, feeling of improper voiding -29,6% and voiding difficulty -17.7%. Functional disorders of lower bowel were found in 43% of patients and the most prevalent symptom was constipation (31%), followed by empting difficulty (12%), dyschesia (9%), and urge stool empting (7.7%). Cardiovascular diseases were found among 43% of respondents, whereas pulmonary diseases with chronic coughing were present in 20% of the analyzed population. Subjective POP symptoms reported by women were as follows: feeling of heaviness in lower abdomen--378%, perineal pain--27.8%, lumbosacral pain-34.2%, and abdominal pain--28.4%. Female sexual disorders were reported by 9,8% women and dyspareunia was found in 7.6% of responders. POP was the main reason for sexual abstinence only in 1 out of 10 patients. More than 30% of patients from the study group underwent previously pelvic surgery due to various reasons. POP related quality of life measured by VAS (Visual Analogue Scale) was 61.4 points (median--60). The most common finding during gynecological examination was cystocele--96.5%, followed by rectoenterocele--92.7%, and central defect--79%. Mean POP quantification was stage III in POP-Q scale. LUTS symptoms (urinary incontinence, urgency and voiding difficulties) were present among 81% of patients whereas lower gastrointestinal disorders (constipation, fecal incontinence, dyschesia) were found in 43% of women affected by POP.

Conclusions: Mean delay time from objective POP diagnosis until decision concerning surgical treatment was more than 5 years. The most common risk factors associated with POP were: multiparity with vaginal deliveries, obesity and aging. The most common defect found among patients with POP was cystocele, followed by rectoenterocele and central defect however most patients presented with advanced combined defects.
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November 2010

Stem cell therapy: a future treatment of stress urinary incontinence.

Semin Reprod Med 2011 Jan 4;29(1):61-70. Epub 2011 Jan 4.

Department of Urology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan, USA.

The main urinary continence mechanism in human is the striated muscle rhabdosphincter that forms a ring around the mid-urethra. Cellular therapy and the use of stem cells transplanted into the site of the rhabdosphincter in a setting of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) may augment sphincter regeneration. Implanted cells may also release trophic factors promoting muscle and nerve integration into this muscle. We review the use of cellular therapy for SUI and our experience with the development of muscle-derived stem cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0030-1268705DOI Listing
January 2011

Adult stem cells therapy for urine incontinence in women.

Ginekol Pol 2010 May;81(5):378-81

Department of Gynecology and Oncology, Collegium Medium Jagiellonian University of Kraków.

The past few years brought high development in obtaining and culturing autologous adult stem cells. In this paper we review publications of experimental investigations and clinical trials of the muscle-derived cells and the application in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence among women. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be obtained from bone marrow but it is associated with a painful biopsy procedure. Collection of muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) is less harmful because the skeletal muscle biopsy is performed with a small caliber needle in local anesthesia. The stem-based therapy could be the next step in the treatment of urinary incontinence. There are still many elements of therapy such as effectiveness or long-term side effects which need to be researched.
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May 2010

Cellular therapy for treatment of stress urinary incontinence.

Curr Stem Cell Res Ther 2010 Mar;5(1):57-62

Departament of Gynecology and Oncology, Collegium Medicum Jagiellonian University of Kraków, Poland.

A critical mechanism to maintain urinary continence in women and men is the striated muscle sphincter (rhabdosphincter) that forms a ring around the mid urethra. Cellular therapy and the use of stem cells transplanted into the site of the rhabdosphincter in a setting of stress urinary incontinence may augment sphincter regeneration. Implanted cells may also release trophic factors promoting muscle and nerve integration into this muscle. We hereby review the use of cellular therapy for SUI and our experience with the development of muscle-derived stem cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/157488810790442840DOI Listing
March 2010