Publications by authors named "Kjersti Marie Aagaard"

3 Publications

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From the Field to the Laboratory: Air Pollutant-Induced Genomic Effects in Lung Cells.

Environ Health Insights 2015 18;9(Suppl 4):15-23. Epub 2016 Feb 18.

Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Gillings School of Global Public Health, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.

Current in vitro studies do not typically assess cellular impacts in relation to real-world atmospheric mixtures of gases. In this study, we set out to examine the feasibility of measuring biological responses at the level of gene expression in human lung cells upon direct exposures to air in the field. This study describes the successful deployment of lung cells in the heavily industrialized Houston Ship Channel. By examining messenger RNA (mRNA) levels from exposed lung cells, we identified changes in genes that play a role as inflammatory responders in the cell. The results show anticipated responses from negative and positive controls, confirming the integrity of the experimental protocol and the successful deployment of the in vitro instrument. Furthermore, exposures to ambient conditions displayed robust changes in gene expression. These results demonstrate a methodology that can produce gas-phase toxicity data in the field.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4137/EHI.S15656DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4760675PMC
February 2016

Reply.

Am J Obstet Gynecol 2016 Jan 25;214(1):137-8. Epub 2015 Sep 25.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University/New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2015.09.070DOI Listing
January 2016

Health care justice and its implications for current policy of a mandatory waiting period for elective tubal sterilization.

Am J Obstet Gynecol 2015 Jun 29;212(6):736-9. Epub 2015 Apr 29.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX.

Tubal sterilization during the immediate postpartum period is 1 of the most common forms of contraception in the United States. This time of the procedure has the advantage of 1-time hospitalization, which results in ease and convenience for the woman. The US Collaborative Review of Sterilization Study indicates the high efficacy and effectiveness of postpartum tubal sterilization. Oral and written informed consent is the ethical and legal standard for the performance of elective tubal sterilization for permanent contraception for all patients, regardless of source of payment. Current health care policy and practice regarding elective tubal sterilization for Medicaid beneficiaries places a unique requirement on these patients and their obstetricians: a mandatory waiting period. This requirement originates in decades-old legislation, which we briefly describe. We then introduce the concept of health care justice in professional obstetric ethics and explain how it originates in the ethical concepts of medicine as a profession and of being a patient and its deontologic and consequentialist dimensions. We next identify the implications of health care justice for the current policy of a mandatory 30-day waiting period. We conclude that Medicaid policy allocates access to elective tubal sterilization differently, based on source of payment and gender, which violates health care justice in both its deontologic and consequentialist dimensions. Obstetricians should invoke health care justice in women's health care as the basis for advocacy for needed change in law and health policy, to eliminate health care injustice in women's access to elective tubal sterilization.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2015.03.049DOI Listing
June 2015
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