Publications by authors named "Kimberly Y Conklin"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Molecular and morphological characterization of a novel dihydroanatoxin-a producing Microcoleus species (cyanobacteria) from the Russian River, California, USA.

Harmful Algae 2020 03 4;93:101767. Epub 2020 Mar 4.

California State University San Marcos, 333 S. Twin Oaks Valley Rd., San Marcos, CA, 92096, USA.

Reports of anatoxins poisoning of wildlife and domestic animals by toxigenic cyanobacteria in streams and rivers are increasing globally. Little is known about the taxonomy, morphology and genomics of anatoxins producing species, limiting our knowledge about their environmental preferences. We isolated three benthic non-heterocystous filamentous cyanobacterial strains from the Russian River in Northern California (USA), which produce anatoxin-a and dihydroanatoxin-a. Both 16S rRNA and protein sequence phylogenetic analyses showed that the strains represent a distinct new member of the cyanobacterial genus Microcoleus (Oscillatoriales). A novel species, Microcoleus anatoxicus is described and accompanied with light microscope photomicrographs, toxin profiles and the complete anatoxin-a gene cassette with the first description of the anaK gene in Microcoleus.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hal.2020.101767DOI Listing
March 2020

A metabarcoding comparison of windward and leeward airborne algal diversity across the Ko'olau mountain range on the island of O'ahu, Hawai'i.

J Phycol 2017 04 31;53(2):437-445. Epub 2017 Jan 31.

Department of Botany, University of Hawai'i, 3190 Maile Way, Honolulu, Hawai'i, 96822, USA.

Airborne algae from sites on the windward (n = 3) and leeward (n = 3) sides of the Ko'olau Mountain range of O'ahu, Hawai'i, were sampled for a 16 d period during January and February 2015 using passive collection devices and were characterized using Illumina MiSeq sequencing of the universal plastid amplicon marker. Amplicons were assigned to 3,023 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), which included 1,189 cyanobacteria, 1,009 heterotrophic bacteria, and 304 Eukaryota (of which 284 were algae and land plants). Analyses demonstrated substantially more OTUs at windward than leeward O'ahu sites during the sampling period. Removal of nonalgal OTUs revealed a greater number of algal reads recovered from windward (839,853) than leeward sites (355,387), with the majority of these being cyanobacteria. The 1,234 total algal OTUs included cyanobacteria, diatoms, cryptophytes, brown algae, chlorophyte green algae, and charophyte green algae. A total of 208 algal OTUs were identified from leeward side samplers (including OTUs in common among samplers) and 1,995 algal OTUs were identified from windward samplers. Barcoding analyses of the most abundant algal OTUs indicated that very few were shared between the windward and leeward sides of the Ko'olau Mountains, highlighting the localized scale at which these airborne algae communities differ. Back trajectories of air masses arriving on O'ahu during the sampling period were calculated using the NOAA HY-SPLIT model and suggested that the sampling period was composed of three large-scale meteorological events, indicating a diversity of potential sources of airborne algae outside of the Hawaiian Islands.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jpy.12502DOI Listing
April 2017

New Ulvaceae (Ulvophyceae, Chlorophyta) from mesophotic ecosystems across the Hawaiian Archipelago.

J Phycol 2016 Feb 12;52(1):40-53. Epub 2016 Jan 12.

Department of Botany, University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, 3190 Maile Way, Honolulu, Hawaii, 96822, USA.

Ulvalean algae (Chlorophyta) are most commonly described from intertidal and shallow subtidal marine environments worldwide, but are less well known from mesophotic environments. Their morphological simplicity and phenotypic plasticity make accurate species determinations difficult, even at the generic level. Here, we describe the mesophotic Ulvales species composition from 13 locations across 2,300 km of the Hawaiian Archipelago. Twenty-eight representative Ulvales specimens from 64 to 125 m depths were collected using technical diving, submersibles, and remotely operated vehicles. Morphological and molecular characters suggest that mesophotic Ulvales in Hawaiian waters form unique communities comprising four species within the genera Ulva and Umbraulva, each with discrete geographic and/or depth-related distributional patterns. Three genetically distinct taxa are supported by both plastid (rbcL and tufA) and nuclear (ITS1) markers, and are presented here as new species: Umbraulva kaloakulau, Ulva ohiohilulu, and Ulva iliohaha. We also propose a new Umbraulva species (Umbraulva kuaweuweu), which is closely related to subtidal records from New Zealand and Australia, but not formally described. To our knowledge, these are the first marine species descriptions from Hawai'i resulting from the collaboration of traditional Hawaiian nomenclature specialists, cultural practitioners and scientists. The difficulty of finding reliable diagnostic morphological characters for these species reflects a common problem worldwide of achieving accurate identification of ulvalean taxa using solely morphological criteria. Mesophotic Ulvales appear to be distinct from shallow-water populations in Hawai'i, but their degree of similarity to mesophotic floras in other locations in the Pacific remains unknown.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jpy.12375DOI Listing
February 2016

The Hawaiian freshwater algae biodiversity survey (2009-2014): systematic and biogeographic trends with an emphasis on the macroalgae.

BMC Ecol 2014 Oct 25;14:28. Epub 2014 Oct 25.

Background: A remarkable range of environmental conditions is present in the Hawaiian Islands due to their gradients of elevation, rainfall and island age. Despite being well known as a location for the study of evolutionary processes and island biogeography, little is known about the composition of the non-marine algal flora of the archipelago, its degree of endemism, or affinities with other floras. We conducted a biodiversity survey of the non-marine macroalgae of the six largest main Hawaiian Islands using molecular and microscopic assessment techniques. We aimed to evaluate whether endemism or cosmopolitanism better explain freshwater algal distribution patterns, and provide a baseline data set for monitoring future biodiversity changes in the Hawaiian Islands.

Results: 1,786 aquatic and terrestrial habitats and 1,407 distinct collections of non-marine macroalgae were collected from the islands of Kauai, Oahu, Molokai, Maui, Lanai and Hawaii from the years 2009-2014. Targeted habitats included streams, wet walls, high elevation bogs, taro fields, ditches and flumes, lakes/reservoirs, cave walls and terrestrial areas. Sites that lacked freshwater macroalgae were typically terrestrial or wet wall habitats that were sampled for diatoms and other microalgae. Approximately 50% of the identifications were of green algae, with lesser proportions of diatoms, red algae, cyanobacteria, xanthophytes and euglenoids. 898 DNA sequences were generated representing eight different markers, which enabled an assessment of the number of taxonomic entities for genera collected as part of the survey. Forty-four well-characterized taxa were assessed for global distribution patterns. This analysis revealed no clear biogeographic affinities of the flora, with 27.3% characterized as "cosmopolitan", 11.4% "endemic", and 61.3% as intermediate.

Conclusions: The Hawaiian freshwater algal biodiversity survey represents the first comprehensive effort to characterize the non-marine algae of a tropical region in the world using both morphological and molecular tools. Survey data were entered in the Hawaiian Freshwater Algal Database, which serves as a digital repository of photographs and micrographs, georeferenced localities and DNA sequence data. These analyses yielded an updated checklist of the non-marine macroalgae of the Hawaiian Islands, and revealed varied biogeographic affinities of the flora that are likely a product of both natural and anthropogenic dispersal.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-014-0028-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4222836PMC
October 2014

The Hawaiian Rhodophyta Biodiversity Survey (2006-2010): a summary of principal findings.

BMC Plant Biol 2010 Nov 22;10:258. Epub 2010 Nov 22.

Botany Department, 3190 Maile Way, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA.

Background: The Hawaiian red algal flora is diverse, isolated, and well studied from a morphological and anatomical perspective, making it an excellent candidate for assessment using a combination of traditional taxonomic and molecular approaches. Acquiring and making these biodiversity data freely available in a timely manner ensures that other researchers can incorporate these baseline findings into phylogeographic studies of Hawaiian red algae or red algae found in other locations.

Results: A total of 1,946 accessions are represented in the collections from 305 different geographical locations in the Hawaiian archipelago. These accessions represent 24 orders, 49 families, 152 genera and 252 species/subspecific taxa of red algae. One order of red algae (the Rhodachlyales) was recognized in Hawaii for the first time and 196 new island distributional records were determined from the survey collections. One family and four genera are reported for the first time from Hawaii, and multiple species descriptions are in progress for newly discovered taxa. A total of 2,418 sequences were generated for Hawaiian red algae in the course of this study--915 for the nuclear LSU marker, 864 for the plastidial UPA marker, and 639 for the mitochondrial COI marker. These baseline molecular data are presented as neighbor-joining trees to illustrate degrees of divergence within and among taxa. The LSU marker was typically most conserved, followed by UPA and COI. Phylogenetic analysis of a set of concatenated LSU, UPA and COI sequences recovered a tree that broadly resembled the current understanding of florideophyte red algal relationships, but bootstrap support was largely absent above the ordinal level. Phylogeographic trends are reported here for some common taxa within the Hawaiian Islands and include examples of those with, as well as without, intraspecific variation.

Conclusions: The UPA and COI markers were determined to be the most useful of the three and are recommended for inclusion in future algal biodiversity surveys. Molecular data for the survey provide the most extensive assessment of Hawaiian red algal diversity and, in combination with the morphological/anatomical and distributional data collected as part of the project, provide a solid baseline data set for future studies of the flora. The data are freely available via the Hawaiian Algal Database (HADB), which was designed and constructed to accommodate the results of the project. We present the first DNA sequence reference collection for a tropical Pacific seaweed flora, whose value extends beyond Hawaii since many Hawaiian taxa are shared with other tropical areas.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2229-10-258DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3012605PMC
November 2010

The Hawaiian Algal Database: a laboratory LIMS and online resource for biodiversity data.

BMC Plant Biol 2009 Sep 4;9:117. Epub 2009 Sep 4.

Department of Molecular Biosciences and Bioengineering, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822, USA.

Background: Organization and presentation of biodiversity data is greatly facilitated by databases that are specially designed to allow easy data entry and organized data display. Such databases also have the capacity to serve as Laboratory Information Management Systems (LIMS). The Hawaiian Algal Database was designed to showcase specimens collected from the Hawaiian Archipelago, enabling users around the world to compare their specimens with our photographs and DNA sequence data, and to provide lab personnel with an organizational tool for storing various biodiversity data types.

Description: We describe the Hawaiian Algal Database, a comprehensive and searchable database containing photographs and micrographs, geo-referenced collecting information, taxonomic checklists and standardized DNA sequence data. All data for individual samples are linked through unique accession numbers. Users can search online for sample information by accession number, numerous levels of taxonomy, or collection site. At the present time the database contains data representing over 2,000 samples of marine, freshwater and terrestrial algae from the Hawaiian Archipelago. These samples are primarily red algae, although other taxa are being added.

Conclusion: The Hawaiian Algal Database is a digital repository for Hawaiian algal samples and acts as a LIMS for the laboratory. Users can make use of the online search tool to view and download specimen photographs and micrographs, DNA sequences and relevant habitat data, including georeferenced collecting locations. It is publicly available at http://algae.manoa.hawaii.edu.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2229-9-117DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2746215PMC
September 2009
-->