Publications by authors named "Kerisha Naidoo"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Developing a Model of Care for Home Infusions of Natalizumab for People With Multiple Sclerosis.

J Infus Nurs 2019 Nov/Dec;42(6):289-296

Adelaide Nursing School, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia (Drs Schultz and Cusack, Ms Juaton); Post Op Care at Home (Pty Ltd), McLaren Vale, South Australia, Australia (Ms Thomas); Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia (Mr Georgiou, Mr Webb, Ms Simon, and Dr Ravindran); Biogen Inc, Tokyo, Japan (Ms Naidoo); College of Medicine and Public Health, Flinders University, Bedford Park, South Australia, Australia (Dr Karnon). Timothy J. Schultz, PhD, is senior research fellow and postgraduate coordinator in Adelaide Nursing School. He is an interdisciplinary researcher who focuses on the role of nursing in health care delivery. His main areas of research are systematic reviews, health services, patient safety, and the implementation of evidence into practice. Anne Thomas, BSc, RN, is an experienced registered nurse and director of Post-Op Care At Home (Pty Ltd), which was subcontracted to deliver home infusions. She has extensive experience with the pharmaceutical industry, including delivering home infusions with Baxter Healthcare and companies throughout Australia. Paul Georgiou, MNsg(AcuteCare), RN, is the nurse unit manager at the Medical Day Treatment Unit, Royal Adelaide Hospital. This unit manages people with life-long chronic diseases as a referral service delivery by skilled nurses. Mr Georgiou is also a member of the Royal Australian Army Nursing Corps, with experience in operational and nonoperational roles. Lynette Cusack, PhD, MHA, RN, is an associate professor in the Adelaide Nursing School. Her research focus is on the contemporary role of the nurse in a range of different contexts, redefining models of practice, including impact on the health care system, interdisciplinary team, and patients' experience. Mahasen Juaton, MNsg, RN, is a master of clinical science (research) candidate at the Adelaide Nursing School. Lorraine Simon, MNsg, RN, is the assistant nurse unit manager at the Medical Day Treatment Unit at Royal Adelaide Hospital. Kerisha Naidoo, MPharm, MBA, is an employee of Biogen Inc, a multinational biotechnology company specializing in the discovery, development, and delivery of therapies for neurological diseases. She is the head of the medical excellence and operation team in Japan, leading data generation, medical operations, field medical excellence, and patient services functions. Kevin Webb, BNurs, RN, is a neurology nurse consultant at Royal Adelaide Hospital and the Queen Elizabeth Hospital. Jonathan Karnon, PhD, MSc, is a health economist at Flinders University. His main area of research is the use of economic evaluation to inform health service decision-making. Dr Karnon has developed and applied methods for the economic evaluations of health care technologies and services in Australia and the United Kingdom. Janakan Ravindran, MBBS, is a consultant neurologist at the Royal Adelaide and Lyell McEwin hospitals. He is currently the clinical lead for neuroimmunology at the Royal Adelaide Hospital and has particular subspecialty interests in multiple sclerosis and other neuroimmunological conditions, as well as peripheral neuromuscular disorders.

Natalizumab is an effective treatment for multiple sclerosis that requires 4-weekly infusions that are usually provided in hospital outpatient clinics. In this study, a model of care (MOC), an overarching design for the provision of a health care service, was developed to permit home infusions of natalizumab. The proposed new MOC comprised 9 dimensions, in addition to the central concept of patient-centered care at home. The new MOC is responsive to patient needs and prioritizes the nurse-patient therapeutic relationship. It provides practical examples of patient-centered care to guide clinical practice for this patient population in the home setting.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000343DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7328856PMC
April 2020

Incidence of pregnancy and disease-modifying therapy exposure trends in women with multiple sclerosis: A contemporary cohort study.

Mult Scler Relat Disord 2019 Feb 3;28:235-243. Epub 2019 Jan 3.

Department of Neuroscience, Central Clinical School, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia; Department of Neurology, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Australia; Department of Medicine (Royal Melbourne Hospital), University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. Electronic address:

Background: Exposure to disease-modifying therapy (DMT) during early pregnancy in women with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) may be increasing.

Objective: To retrospectively determine incidence of pregnancy, DMT exposure and pregnancy outcomes in women with RRMS.

Methods: We identified all women with RRMS aged 15-45 years in the MSBase Registry between 2005-2016. Annualised pregnancy incidence rates were calculated using Poisson regression models. DMT exposures and pregnancy outcomes were assessed.

Results: Of 9,098 women meeting inclusion criteria, 1,178 (13%) women recorded 1,521 pregnancies. The annualised incidence rate of pregnancy was 0.042 (95% CI 0.040, 0.045). A total of 635 (42%) reported pregnancies were conceived on DMT, increasing from 27% in 2006 to 62% in 2016. The median duration of DMT exposure during pregnancy was 30 days (IQR: 9, 50). There were a higher number of induced abortions on FDA pregnancy class C/D drugs compared with pregnancy class B and no DMT (p = 0.010); but no differences in spontaneous abortions, term or preterm births.

Conclusions: We report low pregnancy incidence rates, with increasing number of pregnancies conceived on DMT over the past 12-years. The median duration of DMT exposure in pregnancy was relatively short at one month.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.msard.2019.01.003DOI Listing
February 2019

Disability and HIV: What drives this relationship in Eastern and Southern Africa?

Afr J Disabil 2013 12;2(1):25. Epub 2013 Feb 12.

Health Economics and HIV and AIDS Research Division (HEARD), University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

The Eastern and Southern Africa (ESA) region is the epicentre of the global HIV epidemic and also home to a large number of people with disabilities. Both HIV and Disability are significant public health issues. While they are generally viewed as distinct and unrelated phenomena data seems to suggest that they are particularly closely intertwined in ESA. For the first time in history, by using the same disability indicator consistently, the publication of the World Report on Disability in 2011 has allowed for the comparison of disability data between countries, and across regions. This has the potential to shed some light on the relationship between disability and socio-economic markers and other health conditions in a way that was not possible previously. In the absence of disability and HIV-specific population-based surveys, this paper uses global socio-economic and HIV datasets and compares them to data contained in the most recent World Report on Disability. The analysis suggests that disability prevalence may be related to HIV-prevalence in ESA (Pearson 0.87). It identifies research and policy gaps and seeks to shed light on the relationship between the two phenomena. It concludes that, more than any other region in the world, ESA needs to ensure better data collection on disability and the inclusion of disability throughout its HIV programmes in order to provide a comprehensive and appropriate response to the epidemic.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4102/ajod.v2i1.25DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5442577PMC
February 2013

Patterns of disclosure and antiretroviral treatment adherence in a South African mining workplace programme and implications for HIV prevention.

Afr J AIDS Res 2011 ;10 Suppl 1:357-68

a University of KwaZulu-Natal, School of Psychology (Howard College) , Private Bag X54001 , Durban , 4000 , South Africa.

Social and psychological barriers to the disclosure of one's seropositive HIV status to significant others and poor adherence to taking medications pose significant challenges to the scaling-up of access to antiretroviral treatment (ART) in the workplace. Such barriers are predictive of sub-optimal treatment outcomes and bedevil HIV-prevention interventions at a societal level. Against this background, this article explores the lived experiences of 19 HIV-positive male participants, between the ages of 33 and 57 years, who were enrolled in an ART programme managed at an occupational health clinic at a mining company in South Africa. The majority of these mineworkers had been aware of their HIV status for between 5 and 7 years. The study explored psychological and relational factors, as aspects of these participants lived experiences, which had a bearing on their adherence to their ART regimen and the disclosure choices that they made regarding their HIV status. In our sample, those participants who were adherent demonstrated higher levels of control and acceptance of their HIV infection and were more confident in their ability to manage their treatment, while the group who were non-adherent presented with lower levels of adherence motivation and self-efficacy, difficulties in maintaining a healthy lifestyle and significant challenges in maintaining control over their lives. While most of the men favoured disclosing their HIV status to their partners for the sake of treatment support, they were less sure about disclosing to family members and non-family members, respectively, because of their need to protect these persons and due to their fear of being stigmatised. It was evident that treatment adherence choices and behaviours were impacted by psychological and relational factors, including disclosure decisions. We conclude with a bivariate model for understanding the adherence behaviours that influenced different patterns of ART adherence among the sample, and offer recommendations for HIV-prevention and treatment interventions in a mining workplace.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2989/16085906.2011.637737DOI Listing
September 2015