Publications by authors named "Kasper Aaboe"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

[Metformin and the obstetric patient].

Ugeskr Laeger 2015 Dec;177(50):V05150438

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with insulin resistance, infertility, obesity and gestational complications. Metformin is widely used in fertility treatment of women with PCOS, due to a suggested positive effect of continued metformin treatment beyond the first trimester on pregnancy complications. Larger randomized trials have failed to confirm this. Metformin treatment has not been found to be superior to insulin treatment in women with gestational diabetes and may be associated with long-term consequences in the children in the form of overweight and disturbed glucose metabolism.
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December 2015

Glucagon-like peptide-2, but not glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, stimulates glucagon release in patients with type 1 diabetes.

Regul Pept 2010 Aug 24;163(1-3):96-101. Epub 2010 May 24.

Department of Internal Medicine F, Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Niels Andersens Vej 65, DK-2900 Hellerup, Denmark.

This study investigated the glucagon-releasing properties of the hormones glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) in 8 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) without paracrine intraislet influence of insulin (C-peptide negative following a 5 g intravenous arginine stimulation; on study days only treated with basal insulin substitution). On 3 study days, 180-minute two-step glucose clamps were performed. Plasma glucose (PG) was clamped at fasting values, with a mean of 7.4+/-0.5 mM in the first 90 min (period 1) and raised 1.5 times the fasting values to a mean of 11.1+/-0.1 mM in the last 90 min (period 2). In randomised order either GIP, GLP-2, or saline were infused intravenously during first 50 min in both periods at rates designed to mimic postprandial hormone responses. The resulting incremental area under curve values of glucagon were in period 1 -38+/-44 (GIP), 120+/-48 (GLP-2), and -16+/-61 (saline) pMx90 min (p=0.087), respectively; and in period 2 -157+/-76, 135+/-52, and -77+/-77pMx90 min (p=0.019), respectively. Post hoc analysis showed significant differences only between the GLP-2 days versus the GIP and saline days. In conclusion, GLP-2, but not GIP, was found to stimulate the release of glucagon in patients with T1DM, suggesting a role for GLP-2 in the postprandial hyperglucagonaemia characterising individuals with T1DM.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.regpep.2010.05.004DOI Listing
August 2010

KATP channel closure ameliorates the impaired insulinotropic effect of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide in patients with type 2 diabetes.

J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2009 Feb 2;94(2):603-8. Epub 2008 Dec 2.

Department of Internal Medicine F, Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Niels Andersens Vej 65, Hellerup DK-2900, Denmark.

Objective: The reduced incretin effect in subjects with type 2 diabetes is accompanied by a severely impaired insulinotropic effect of the incretin hormone glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP). The K(ATP) channels of the beta-cell appear to be essential for the function of GIP in mice, and mutations in the gene encoding these channels have been linked to the development of type 2 diabetes. With this study we therefore aimed at clarifying the role of K(ATP) channel malfunction in the impaired function of GIP.

Research Design And Methods: We examined 12 subjects with type 2 diabetes using a 2-h (15 mM) hyperglycemic clamp on 4 separate days with concomitant infusion of one of the following: GIP; GIP + 10 mg sulfonylurea (SU, glipizide) taken orally 1 h before the clamp; saline + 10 mg SU; or saline alone. Blood was sampled to measure plasma concentrations of glucose, intact GIP, insulin, C-peptide, and glucagon.

Results: Compared to the results of GIP alone, SU alone, or those results added together, coadministration of GIP and SU resulted in a more-than-additive increase in the peripheral insulin (P = 0.002) and C-peptide (P = 0.028) responses and furthermore, a more-than-additive increase in total (P = 0.01), early (P = 0.02), and late-phase (P = 0.02) insulin secretion.

Conclusion: We have demonstrated that inhibiting the K(ATP) channels of the diabetic beta-cell acutely using SU significantly increases both the peripheral insulin response to GIP and GIP-induced insulin secretion, indicating an ameliorated insulinotropic effect of GIP.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1210/jc.2008-1731DOI Listing
February 2009

GLP-1: physiological effects and potential therapeutic applications.

Diabetes Obes Metab 2008 Nov 22;10(11):994-1003. Epub 2008 Apr 22.

Department of Internal Medicine F, Gentofte University Hospital, Hellerup, Denmark.

Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is a gut-derived incretin hormone with the potential to change diabetes. The physiological effects of GLP-1 are multiple, and many seem to ameliorate the different conditions defining the diverse physiopathology seen in type 2 diabetes. In animal studies, GLP-1 stimulates beta-cell proliferation and neogenesis and inhibits beta-cell apoptosis. In humans, GLP-1 stimulates insulin secretion and inhibits glucagon and gastrointestinal secretions and motility. It enhances satiety and reduces food intake and has beneficial effects on cardiovascular function and endothelial dysfunction. Enhancing incretin action for therapeutic use includes GLP-1 receptor agonists resistant to degradation (incretin mimetics) and dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitors. In clinical trials with type 2 diabetic patients on various oral antidiabetic regimes, both treatment modalities efficaciously improve glycaemic control and beta-cell function. Whereas the incretin mimetics induce weight loss, the DPP-4 inhibitors are considered weight neutral. In type 1 diabetes, treatment with GLP-1 shows promising effects. However, several areas need clinical confirmation: the durability of the weight loss, the ability to preserve functional beta-cell mass and the applicability in other than type 2 diabetes. As such, long-term studies and studies with cardiovascular end-points are needed to confirm the true benefits of these new classes of antidiabetic drugs in the treatment of diabetes mellitus.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1463-1326.2008.00853.xDOI Listing
November 2008

[Laparoscopic repair of giant incisional hernia after abdominal wall reconstruction].

Ugeskr Laeger 2007 Sep;169(38):3209-10

Gentofte Hospital, Kirurgisk Afdeling D.

Laparoscopic repair of giant incisional hernias, traditionally treated using the open technique with abdominal wall reconstruction, represents a development in the operative method with fewer peri- and post-operative complications. The authors present a patient with a giant incisional hernia after primary right hemipelvic chondrosarcoma and pelvic resection. The patient was treated with laparoscopic repair, in which a large prolene mesh was implanted, and the patient had an uncomplicated post-operative course.
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September 2007

The elimination rates of intact GIP as well as its primary metabolite, GIP 3-42, are similar in type 2 diabetic patients and healthy subjects.

Regul Pept 2006 Dec 28;137(3):168-72. Epub 2006 Aug 28.

Department of Internal Medicine F, Gentofte Hospital, Denmark.

Unlabelled: The incretin hormone, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP, previously known as gastric inhibitory polypeptide), is rapidly degraded to the biologically inactive metabolite GIP (3-42) in the circulation, but little is known about the kinetics of the intact hormone and the metabolite and whether differences exist between patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and healthy subjects. We examined eight type 2 diabetic patients (six men, two women); mean (range) age: 59 (48-69) years; BMI: 31.6 (26.0-37.7) kg/m2; HbA1C: 9.0 (8.2-13.2) %; fasting plasma glucose (FPG): 10.0 (8.3-13.2) mmol/l and 8 healthy subjects matched for age, gender and BMI. An intravenous bolus injection of GIP (7.5 nmol) was given and venous blood samples were drawn the following 45 minutes. Peak concentrations of total GIP (intact+metabolite, mean+/-SEM) and intact GIP (in brackets) were 920+/-91 (442+/-52) pmol/l in the type 2 diabetic patients and 775+/-68 (424+/-30) pmol/l in the healthy subjects (NS). GIP was eliminated rapidly with the clearance rate for intact GIP being 2.3+/-0.2 l/min in the type 2 diabetic patients and 2.4+/-0.2 l/min in the healthy subjects (NS). The volumes of distributions were similar in the two groups and ranged from 8 to 21 l per subject. The primary metabolite, GIP 3-42, generated through the action of dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV), was eliminated with a mean half-life of 17.5 and 20.5 min in patients and healthy subjects (NS).

Conclusion: Elimination of GIP is similar in obese type 2 diabetic patients and matched healthy subjects. Differences in elimination of GIP and its primary metabolite, therefore, do not seem to contribute to the defective insulinotropic effect of GIP in type 2 diabetes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.regpep.2006.07.007DOI Listing
December 2006
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