Publications by authors named "Julie Hahn"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Therapeutic review of cabotegravir/rilpivirine long-acting antiretroviral injectable and implementation considerations at an HIV specialty clinic.

Pharmacotherapy 2021 Jun 15. Epub 2021 Jun 15.

Indiana University Health, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA.

Cabotegravir/rilpivirine (CAB/RPV) was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as the first complete parenteral antiretroviral (ART) regimen for treatment of people living with HIV (PLWH). As a monthly intramuscular (IM) injection, this therapy constitutes a major departure from the traditional paradigm of oral therapy requiring (at least) daily administration that has defined HIV treatment for decades. Composed of a second-generation integrase inhibitor (INSTI) and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), CAB/RPV has achieved high rates of sustained virologic suppression with a favorable safety profile for treatment-experienced PLWH following oral lead-in (OLI) during several clinical trials. In addition to the clinical benefits of this agent, patient-reported outcomes associated with convenience, confidentiality, and the tolerability of the injections have consistently reflected positive perceptions of CAB/RPV. The novel nature of this therapy in the field of HIV presents logistical challenges. Clinics will need to address barriers related to management of clinic workflow, procurement, reimbursement, and nonadherence. The aim of this review was to summarize the available safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) data of this long-acting (LA) injectable regimen as well as discuss some potential considerations for prescribing and operationalization.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/phar.2605DOI Listing
June 2021

Genetic loci associated with prevalent and incident myocardial infarction and coronary heart disease in the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) Consortium.

PLoS One 2020 13;15(11):e0230035. Epub 2020 Nov 13.

The Institute for Translational Genomics and Population Sciences, Department of Pediatrics, The Lundquist Institute for Biomedical Innovation at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, California, United States of America.

Background: Genome-wide association studies have identified multiple genomic loci associated with coronary artery disease, but most are common variants in non-coding regions that provide limited information on causal genes and etiology of the disease. To overcome the limited scope that common variants provide, we focused our investigation on low-frequency and rare sequence variations primarily residing in coding regions of the genome.

Methods And Results: Using samples of individuals of European ancestry from ten cohorts within the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) consortium, both cross-sectional and prospective analyses were conducted to examine associations between genetic variants and myocardial infarction (MI), coronary heart disease (CHD), and all-cause mortality following these events. For prevalent events, a total of 27,349 participants of European ancestry, including 1831 prevalent MI cases and 2518 prevalent CHD cases were used. For incident cases, a total of 55,736 participants of European ancestry were included (3,031 incident MI cases and 5,425 incident CHD cases). There were 1,860 all-cause deaths among the 3,751 MI and CHD cases from six cohorts that contributed to the analysis of all-cause mortality. Single variant and gene-based analyses were performed separately in each cohort and then meta-analyzed for each outcome. A low-frequency intronic variant (rs988583) in PLCL1 was significantly associated with prevalent MI (OR = 1.80, 95% confidence interval: 1.43, 2.27; P = 7.12 × 10-7). We conducted gene-based burden tests for genes with a cumulative minor allele count (cMAC) ≥ 5 and variants with minor allele frequency (MAF) < 5%. TMPRSS5 and LDLRAD1 were significantly associated with prevalent MI and CHD, respectively, and RC3H2 and ANGPTL4 were significantly associated with incident MI and CHD, respectively. No loci were significantly associated with all-cause mortality following a MI or CHD event.

Conclusion: This study identified one known locus (ANGPTL4) and four new loci (PLCL1, RC3H2, TMPRSS5, and LDLRAD1) associated with cardiovascular disease risk that warrant further investigation.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0230035PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7665790PMC
December 2020

Identifying predictors of upper extremity muscle elasticity with healthy aging.

J Biomech 2020 04 25;103:109687. Epub 2020 Feb 25.

School of Kinesiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. Electronic address:

Ultrasound shear wave elastography (SWE) can provide accurate in vivo measurements of the effect of advanced age on muscle elasticity. Our objective was to determine whether passive muscle elasticity was influenced by posture, chronological age, sex, body mass index, and clinical measures of upper extremity function for healthy adults. The dominant arm of 33 male and 33 female participants (ranging from 20 to 89 years old) was examined using a Supersonic Imagine Aixplorer ultrasound SWE system. The mean and standard deviation of shear wave velocity (SWV) was measured from elastography maps for five upper extremity muscles examined at rest: anterior deltoid (AD), biceps brachii (BB), clavicular (CL) and sternocostal (SC) region of the pectoralis major and middle trapezius (MT). Linear mixed models for each muscle were used to assess how SWV was influenced by humeral elevation, chronological age, sex, BMI and three functional measures. All significances are reported at α = 0.05. Humeral elevation influenced shear wave velocity at a statistically significant level for AD, BB, SC and MT (all p < 0.047). Chronological age was a significant predictor of mean SWV for the sternocostal region of the pectoralis major and the middle trapezius (both p < 0.03). These same muscles were also less homogenous (based on their standard deviations) with increased age, particularly for female participants. Performance-based functional assessments of the upper extremity were predictors of mean SWV for the clavicular region of the pectoralis major (all p < 0.04). These results suggest ultrasound SWE has potential utility for assessing age-related changes to muscle elasticity, but these associations were muscle-dependent.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbiomech.2020.109687DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7168868PMC
April 2020

Development of a hospital reiki training program: training volunteers to provide reiki to patients, families, and staff in the acute care setting.

Dimens Crit Care Nurs 2014 Jan-Feb;33(1):15-21

Julie Hahn, MA, BCC, (Board-Certified Chaplain) Reiki Master, is the Coordinator of Brigham and Women's Reiki Volunteer Program, a position she has held since the inception of the program in July 2009. Prior to that, Julie was the Resident Chaplain at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. Patricia M. Reilly, MSN, RN, is the Nurse Director of Integrative Care at Brigham and Women's Hospital. She has held a variety of leadership positions in critical care nursing and perioperative nursing. Her current interests lie in developing a caring healing environment for both patients and staff. Teresa M. Buchanan, MBA, RN, is a Nursing Project Manager and has held a variety of educational, managerial, leadership, and consultant positions, with a particular focus on program development and project management in health care settings. She currently is supporting the Integrative Care Program at Brigham and Women's Hospital.

Creating a healing and healthy environment for patients, families, and staff is an ongoing challenge. As part of our hospital's Integrative Care Program, a Reiki Volunteer Program has helped to foster a caring and healing environment, providing a means for patients, family, and staff to reduce pain and anxiety and improve their ability to relax and be present. Because direct care providers manage multiple and competing needs at any given time, they may not be available to provide Reiki when it is needed. This program demonstrates that a volunteer-based program can successfully support nurses in meeting patient, family, and staff demand for Reiki services.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/DCC.0000000000000009DOI Listing
April 2015

The cis-regulatory system of the tbrain gene: Alternative use of multiple modules to promote skeletogenic expression in the sea urchin embryo.

Dev Biol 2009 Nov 11;335(2):428-41. Epub 2009 Aug 11.

Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA.

The genomic cis-regulatory systems controlling regulatory gene expression usually include multiple modules. The regulatory output of such systems at any given time depends on which module is directing the function of the basal transcription apparatus, and ultimately on the transcription factor inputs into that module. Here we examine regulation of the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus tbrain gene, a required activator of the skeletogenic specification state in the lineage descendant from the embryo micromeres. Alternate cis-regulatory modules were found to convey skeletogenic expression in reporter constructs. To determine their relative developmental functions in context, we made use of recombineered BAC constructs containing a GFP reporter and of derivatives from which specific modules had been deleted. The outputs of the various constructs were observed spatially by GFP fluorescence and quantitatively over time by QPCR. In the context of the complete genomic locus, early skeletogenic expression is controlled by an intron enhancer plus a proximal region containing a HesC site as predicted from network analysis. From ingression onward, however, a dedicated distal module utilizing positive Ets1/2 inputs contributes to definitive expression in the skeletogenic mesenchyme. This module also mediates a newly discovered negative Erg input which excludes non-skeletogenic mesodermal expression.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ydbio.2009.08.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2784196PMC
November 2009

Single-center analysis of living donor nephrectomy: hand-assisted laparoscopic, pure laparoscopic, and traditional open.

Prog Transplant 2002 Sep;12(3):206-11

Tulane Center for Abdominal Transplantation, Tulane University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, La., USA.

Context: Laparoscopic living donor nephrectomy has been shown to be a safe method for removing kidneys for transplantation, but concerns have been raised regarding safety and long-term kidney function.

Objective: To compare safety and long-term kidney function in hand-assisted laparoscopic, pure laparoscopic, and traditional open living donor nephrectomy.

Method: The charts of 48 patients with more than 1 year follow-up were reviewed. Thirty-four consecutive patients underwent laparoscopic live donor nephrectomy, and 14 had open donor nephrectomy. All kidneys functioned immediately at transplantation. In the laparoscopic group, 11 had the pure laparoscopic technique, and 23 patients had hand-assisted laparoscopic nephrectomy.

Results: Total operative and warm ischemic times were reduced with the hand-assisted technique when compared with pure laparoscopy. Operative and warm ischemic times were similar in open nephrectomy and hand-assisted laparoscopy. Long-term follow-up of serum creatinine levels revealed no significant differences between the 3 groups. Complication rates in the 3 groups were similar.

Conclusion: Laparoscopic donor nephrectomy appears to be comparable to open donor nephrectomy in terms of safety and long-term graft function.
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September 2002
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