Publications by authors named "Jori Aalders"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Hypoglycaemia and diabetes-specific quality of life in adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

Diabet Med 2021 Aug 12;38(8):e14565. Epub 2021 Apr 12.

Department of Psychology, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.

Aims: To examine whether frequency, perceived severity and fear of hypoglycaemia are independently associated with diabetes-specific quality of life in adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

Methods: Cross-sectional self-reported data on demographics, frequency and perceived severity of both self-treated and severe hypoglycaemia, fear of hypoglycaemia (Hypoglycaemia Fear Survey-Child version) and diabetes-specific quality of life (Pediatric Quality of Life Diabetes Module; PedsQL-DM) were obtained from the project 'Whose diabetes is it anyway?'. Hierarchical regression analyses were performed for the total scale and recommended summary scores of the PedsQL-DM as dependent variables; independent variables were entered in the following steps: (1) age, gender and HbA , (2) frequency of hypoglycaemia, (3) perceived severity of hypoglycaemia and (4) fear of hypoglycaemia.

Results: Adolescents (12-18 years; n = 96) completed questionnaires. In the first three steps, female gender (p < 0.05), higher HbA (p < 0.05), higher frequency of severe hypoglycaemia (p < 0.05) and higher perceived severity of severe (p < 0.05) and self-treated hypoglycaemia (p < 0.001) were significantly associated with lower diabetes-specific quality of life (β ranging from 0.20 to 0.35). However, in the final model only fear of hypoglycaemia was significantly associated with QoL (p < 0.001). Adolescents with greater fear reported lower diabetes-specific quality of life, with 52% explained variance. This pattern was observed across subdomains of diabetes-specific quality of life.

Conclusions: Fear of hypoglycaemia was the only factor independently associated with diabetes-specific quality of life, whereas frequency and perceived severity of hypoglycaemia were not. These findings highlight the importance of awareness and assessment of fear of hypoglycaemia in clinical practice.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dme.14565DOI Listing
August 2021

The division and transfer of care responsibilities in paediatric type 1 diabetes: A qualitative study on parental perspectives.

J Adv Nurs 2021 Apr 16;77(4):1968-1979. Epub 2021 Feb 16.

Department of Medical and Clinical Psychology, Center of Research on Psychological and Somatic disorders [CoRPS], Tilburg University, Tilburg, The Netherlands.

Aim: To determine which factors other than child age play a role in the division and transfer of diabetes care responsibilities between parents and children with type 1 diabetes.

Design: Qualitative focus group study.

Methods: Across four sites in the Netherlands, 18 parents (13 mothers) of children (9-14 years) with type 1 diabetes participated in four focus groups in 2015-2016, as part of the research project 'Whose diabetes is it anyway?'. Qualitative content analysis and the constant comparison method were used to analyse the data.

Results: According to parents, the transfer process included both direct and indirect tasks, had different levels (remembering, deciding, performing), was at times a difficult and stressful process, and showed large variation between families. A large number of child, parent and context factors were identified that affected the division and transfer of diabetes care responsibilities according to parents. Both positive and negative consequences of the transfer process were described for parental and child health, behaviour and well-being. Parental final evaluations of the division and transfer of diabetes care responsibilities appeared to be dependent on parenting values.

Conclusion: How families divide and transfer diabetes care tasks appeared to be affected by a complex interplay of child, parent and context characteristics, which had an impact on several parent and child domains.

Impact: Parents struggle with the right timing of transfer, which calls for more support from diabetes nurses. The identified factors can be used as input for integrating a more family-based approach into current age-based guidelines, to improve regular care.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jan.14781DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8048668PMC
April 2021

Comment on Schmitz et al. Recurrent subthreshold depression in type 2 diabetes: an important risk factor for poor health outcomes. Diabetes care 2014;37:970-978.

Diabetes Care 2014 Jun;37(6):e145

Department of Medical and Clinical Psychology, Center of Research on Psychology in Somatic Diseases, Tilburg University, Tilburg, the Netherlands

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/dc14-0062DOI Listing
June 2014
-->