Publications by authors named "Jiansu Shao"

7 Publications

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Single-cell evaluation reveals shifts in the tumor-immune niches that shape and maintain aggressive lesions in the breast.

Nat Commun 2021 08 18;12(1):5024. Epub 2021 Aug 18.

Department of Experimental Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, 77030, USA.

There is an unmet clinical need for stratification of breast lesions as indolent or aggressive to tailor treatment. Here, single-cell transcriptomics and multiparametric imaging applied to a mouse model of breast cancer reveals that the aggressive tumor niche is characterized by an expanded basal-like population, specialization of tumor subpopulations, and mixed-lineage tumor cells potentially serving as a transition state between luminal and basal phenotypes. Despite vast tumor cell-intrinsic differences, aggressive and indolent tumor cells are functionally indistinguishable once isolated from their local niche, suggesting a role for non-tumor collaborators in determining aggressiveness. Aggressive lesions harbor fewer total but more suppressed-like T cells, and elevated tumor-promoting neutrophils and IL-17 signaling, disruption of which increase tumor latency and reduce the number of aggressive lesions. Our study provides insight into tumor-immune features distinguishing indolent from aggressive lesions, identifies heterogeneous populations comprising these lesions, and supports a role for IL-17 signaling in aggressive progression.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-021-25240-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8373912PMC
August 2021

Resistance to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in triple-negative breast cancer mediated by a reversible drug-tolerant state.

Sci Transl Med 2019 04;11(488)

Department of Experimental Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

Eradicating triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) resistant to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) is a critical unmet clinical need. In this study, patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models of treatment-naïve TNBC and serial biopsies from TNBC patients undergoing NACT were used to elucidate mechanisms of chemoresistance in the neoadjuvant setting. Barcode-mediated clonal tracking and genomic sequencing of PDX tumors revealed that residual tumors remaining after treatment with standard frontline chemotherapies, doxorubicin (Adriamycin) combined with cyclophosphamide (AC), maintained the subclonal architecture of untreated tumors, yet their transcriptomes, proteomes, and histologic features were distinct from those of untreated tumors. Once treatment was halted, residual tumors gave rise to AC-sensitive tumors with similar transcriptomes, proteomes, and histological features to those of untreated tumors. Together, these results demonstrated that tumors can adopt a reversible drug-tolerant state that does not involve clonal selection as an AC resistance mechanism. Serial biopsies obtained from patients with TNBC undergoing NACT revealed similar histologic changes and maintenance of stable subclonal architecture, demonstrating that AC-treated PDXs capture molecular features characteristic of human TNBC chemoresistance. Last, pharmacologic inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation using an inhibitor currently in phase 1 clinical development delayed residual tumor regrowth. Thus, AC resistance in treatment-naïve TNBC can be mediated by nonselective mechanisms that confer a reversible chemotherapy-tolerant state with targetable vulnerabilities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/scitranslmed.aav0936DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6541393PMC
April 2019

High-resolution clonal mapping of multi-organ metastasis in triple negative breast cancer.

Nat Commun 2018 11 29;9(1):5079. Epub 2018 Nov 29.

Department of Experimental Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, 77054, TX, USA.

Most triple negative breast cancers (TNBCs) are aggressively metastatic with a high degree of intra-tumoral heterogeneity (ITH), but how ITH contributes to metastasis is unclear. Here, clonal dynamics during metastasis were studied in vivo using two patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models established from the treatment-naive primary breast tumors of TNBC patients diagnosed with synchronous metastasis. Genomic sequencing and high-complexity barcode-mediated clonal tracking reveal robust alterations in clonal architecture between primary tumors and corresponding metastases. Polyclonal seeding and maintenance of heterogeneous populations of low-abundance subclones is observed in each metastasis. However, lung, liver, and brain metastases are enriched for an identical population of high-abundance subclones, demonstrating that primary tumor clones harbor properties enabling them to seed and thrive in multiple organ sites. Further, clones that dominate multi-organ metastases share a genomic lineage. Thus, intrinsic properties of rare primary tumor subclones enable the seeding and colonization of metastases in secondary organs in these models.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-018-07406-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6265294PMC
November 2018

A functional genomic screen in vivo identifies CEACAM5 as a clinically relevant driver of breast cancer metastasis.

NPJ Breast Cancer 2018 30;4. Epub 2018 Apr 30.

1Department of Experimental Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 USA.

Tumor cells disseminate early in tumor development making metastasis-prevention strategies difficult. Identifying proteins that promote the outgrowth of disseminated tumor cells may provide opportunities for novel therapeutic strategies. Despite multiple studies demonstrating that the mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET) is critical for metastatic colonization, key regulators that initiate this transition remain unknown. We serially passaged lung metastases from a primary triple negative breast cancer xenograft to the mammary fat pads of recipient mice to enrich for gene expression changes that drive metastasis. An unbiased transcriptomic signature of potential metastatic drivers was generated, and a high throughput gain-of-function screen was performed in vivo to validate candidates. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 5 (CEACAM5) was identified as a metastatic driver. CEACAM5 overproduction enriched for an epithelial gene expression pattern and facilitated tumor outgrowth at metastatic sites. Tissues from patients with metastatic breast cancer confirmed elevated levels of CEACAM5 in lung metastases relative to breast tumors, and an inverse correlation between CEACAM5 and the mesenchymal marker vimentin was demonstrated. Thus, CEACAM5 facilitates tumor outgrowth at metastatic sites by promoting MET, warranting its investigation as a therapeutic target and biomarker of aggressiveness in breast cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41523-018-0062-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5928229PMC
April 2018

p53 deficiency linked to B cell translocation gene 2 (BTG2) loss enhances metastatic potential by promoting tumor growth in primary and metastatic sites in patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models of triple-negative breast cancer.

Breast Cancer Res 2016 Jan 27;18(1):13. Epub 2016 Jan 27.

Department of Cancer Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, 77030, USA.

Background: Despite advances in early diagnosis and treatment of cancer patients, metastasis remains the major cause of mortality. TP53 is one of the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer, and these alterations can occur during the early stages of oncogenesis or as later events as tumors progress to more aggressive forms. Previous studies have suggested that p53 plays a role in cellular pathways that govern metastasis. To investigate how p53 deficiency contributes to late-stage tumor growth and metastasis, we developed paired isogenic patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) differing only in p53 status for longitudinal analysis.

Methods: Patient-derived isogenic human tumor lines differing only in p53 status were implanted into mouse mammary glands. Tumor growth and metastasis were monitored with bioluminescence imaging, and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) were quantified by flow cytometry. RNA-Seq was performed on p53-deficient and p53 wild-type tumors, and functional validation of a lead candidate gene was performed in vivo.

Results: Isogenic p53 wild-type and p53-deficient tumors metastasized out of mammary glands and colonized distant sites with similar frequency. However, p53-deficient tumors metastasized earlier than p53 wild-type tumors and grew faster in both primary and metastatic sites as a result of increased proliferation and decreased apoptosis. In addition, greater numbers of CTCs were detected in the blood of mice engrafted with p53-deficient tumors. However, when normalized to tumor mass, the number of CTCs isolated from mice bearing parental and p53-deficient tumors was not significantly different. Gene expression profiling followed by functional validation identified B cell translocation gene 2 (BTG2), a downstream effector of p53, as a negative regulator of tumor growth both at primary and metastatic sites. BTG2 expression status correlated with survival of TNBC patients.

Conclusions: Using paired isogenic PDX-derived metastatic TNBC cells, loss of p53 promoted tumor growth and consequently increased tumor cell shedding into the blood, thus enhancing metastasis. Loss of BTG2 expression in p53-deficient tumors contributed to this metastatic potential by enhancing tumor growth in primary and metastatic sites. Furthermore, clinical data support conclusions generated from PDX models and indicate that BTG2 expression is a candidate prognostic biomarker for TNBC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13058-016-0673-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4728775PMC
January 2016

Deletion of macrophage Vitamin D receptor promotes insulin resistance and monocyte cholesterol transport to accelerate atherosclerosis in mice.

Cell Rep 2015 Mar;10(11):1872-86

Intense effort has been devoted to understanding predisposition to chronic systemic inflammation because it contributes to cardiometabolic disease. We demonstrate that deletion of the macrophage vitamin D receptor (VDR) in mice (KODMAC) is sufficient to induce insulin resistance by promoting M2 macrophage accumulation in the liver as well as increasing cytokine secretion and hepatic glucose production. Moreover, VDR deletion increases atherosclerosis by enabling lipid-laden M2 monocytes to adhere, migrate, and carry cholesterol into the atherosclerotic plaque and by increasing macrophage cholesterol uptake and esterification. Increased foam cell formation results from lack of VDR-SERCA2b interaction, causing SERCA dysfunction, activation of ER stress-CaMKII-JNKp-PPARγ signaling, and induction of the scavenger receptors CD36 and SR-A1. Bone marrow transplant of VDR-expressing cells into KODMAC mice improved insulin sensitivity, suppressed atherosclerosis, and decreased foam cell formation. The immunomodulatory effects of vitamin D in macrophages are thus critical in diet-induced insulin resistance and atherosclerosis in mice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2015.02.043DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4495012PMC
March 2015

Conditional inactivation of FGF receptor 2 reveals an essential role for FGF signaling in the regulation of osteoblast function and bone growth.

Development 2003 Jul;130(13):3063-74

Department of Molecular Biology and Pharmacology, Washington University Medical School, Campus Box 8103, 660 S. Euclid Avenue, St. Louis, Missouri 63110, USA.

Human craniosynostosis syndromes, resulting from activating or neomorphic mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2), underscore an essential role for FGFR2 signaling in skeletal development. Embryos harboring homozygous null mutations in FGFR2 die prior to skeletogenesis. To address the role of FGFR2 in normal bone development, a conditional gene deletion approach was adopted. Homologous introduction of cre recombinase into the Dermo1 (Twist2) gene locus resulted in robust expression of CRE in mesenchymal condensations giving rise to both osteoblast and chondrocyte lineages. Inactivation of a floxed Fgfr2 allele with Dermo1-cre resulted in mice with skeletal dwarfism and decreased bone density. Although differentiation of the osteoblast lineage was not disturbed, the proliferation of osteoprogenitors and the anabolic function of mature osteoblasts were severely affected.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.00491DOI Listing
July 2003
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