Publications by authors named "Jenny M Meerding"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Reversal of Sepsis-Like Features of Neutrophils by Interleukin-1 Blockade in Patients With Systemic-Onset Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

Arthritis Rheumatol 2018 06 7;70(6):943-956. Epub 2018 May 7.

University Medical Center Utrecht, Wilhelmina Children's Hospital and Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Objective: Neutrophils are the most abundant innate immune cells in the blood, but little is known about their role in (acquired) chronic autoinflammatory diseases. This study was undertaken to investigate the role of neutrophils in systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), a prototypical multifactorial autoinflammatory disease that is characterized by arthritis and severe systemic inflammation.

Methods: Fifty patients with systemic-onset JIA who were receiving treatment with recombinant interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (rIL-1Ra; anakinra) were analyzed at disease onset and during remission. RNA sequencing was performed on fluorescence-activated cell-sorted neutrophils from 3 patients with active systemic-onset JIA and 3 healthy controls. Expression of activation markers, apoptosis, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and degranulation of secretory vesicles from neutrophils were assessed by flow cytometry in serum samples from 17 patients with systemic-onset JIA and 15 healthy controls.

Results: Neutrophil counts were markedly increased at disease onset, and this correlated with the levels of inflammatory mediators. The neutrophil counts normalized within days after the initiation of rIL-1Ra therapy. RNA-sequencing analysis revealed a substantial up-regulation of inflammatory processes in neutrophils from patients with active systemic-onset JIA, significantly overlapping with the transcriptome of sepsis. Correspondingly, neutrophils from patients with active systemic-onset JIA displayed a primed phenotype that was characterized by increased ROS production, CD62L shedding, and secretory vesicle degranulation, which was reversed by rIL-1Ra treatment in patients who had achieved clinical remission. Patients with a short disease duration had high neutrophil counts, more immature neutrophils, and a complete response to rIL-1Ra, whereas patients with symptoms for >1 month had normal neutrophil counts and an unsatisfactory response to rIL-1Ra. In vitro, rIL-1Ra antagonized the priming effect of IL-1β on neutrophils from healthy subjects.

Conclusion: These results strongly support the notion that neutrophils play an important role in systemic-onset JIA, especially in the early inflammatory phase of the disease. The findings also demonstrate that neutrophil numbers and the inflammatory activity of systemic-onset JIA are both susceptible to IL-1 blockade.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/art.40442DOI Listing
June 2018

Effect of anticoagulants on 162 circulating immune related proteins in healthy subjects.

Cytokine 2018 06 28;106:114-124. Epub 2017 Oct 28.

Department of Pediatric Immunology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands; Multiplex Core Facility, Laboratory of Translational Immunology, University Medical center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. Electronic address:

Diagnosis of complex disease and response to treatment is often associated with multiple indicators, both clinical and laboratorial. With the use of biomarkers, various mechanisms have been unraveled which can lead to better and faster diagnosis, predicting and monitoring of response to treatment and new drug development. With the introduction of multiplex technology for immunoassays and the growing awareness of the role of immune-monitoring during new therapeutic interventions it is now possible to test large numbers of soluble mediators in small sample volumes. However, standardization of sample collection and laboratory assessments remains suboptimal. We developed a multiplex immunoassay for detection of 162 immune related proteins in human serum and plasma. The assay was split in panels depending on natural occurring concentrations with a maximum of 60 proteins. The aim of this study was to evaluate precision, accuracy, reproducibility and stability of proteins when repeated freeze-thaw cycles are performed of this in-house developed panel, as well as assessing the protein signature in plasma and serum using various anticoagulants. Intra-assay variance of each mediator was <10%. Inter-assay variance ranged between 1.6 and 37% with an average of 12.2%. Recoveries were similar for all mediators (mean 99.8 ± 2.6%) with a range between 89-107%. Next we measured all mediators in serum, EDTA plasma and sodium heparin plasma of 43 healthy control donors. Of these markers only 19 showed similar expression profiles in the 3 different matrixes. Only 5 mediators were effected by multiple freeze-thawing cycles. Principal component analysis revealed different coagulants cluster separately and that sodium heparin shows the most consistent profile.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cyto.2017.10.021DOI Listing
June 2018

Cytokine assays: an assessment of the preparation and treatment of blood and tissue samples.

Methods 2013 May 19;61(1):10-7. Epub 2013 Apr 19.

Department of Pediatric Immunology (KC01.069.0), Centre for Molecular and Cellular Intervention, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Cytokines are key components of the innate and adaptive immune system. As pivotal players in the progression or regression of a pathological process, these molecules provide a window through which diseases can be monitored and can thus act as biomarkers. In order to measure cytokine levels, a plethora of protocols can be applied. These methods include bioassays, protein microarrays, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Meso Scale Discovery (MSD) electrochemiluminescence and bead based multiplex immunoassays (MIA). Due to the interaction and activity of cytokines, multiplex immunoassays are at the forefront of cytokine analysis by allowing multiple cytokines to be measured in parallel. However, even with optimized protocols, sample standardization needs to occur before these proteins can optimally act as biomarkers. This review describes various factors influencing the levels of cytokines measured in plasma, serum, dried blood spots and tissue biopsies, focusing on sample collection and handling, long term storage and the repetitive use of samples. By analyzing how each of these factors influences protein levels, it is concluded that samples should be stored at low temperatures in order to maintain cytokine stability. In addition, within a study, sample manipulations should be kept the same, with measurement protocols being chosen for their compatibility with the research in question. By having a clear understanding of what factors influence cytokine levels and how to overcome these technical issues, minimally confounded data can be obtained and cytokines can achieve optimal biomarker activity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ymeth.2013.04.005DOI Listing
May 2013