Publications by authors named "Jamil Aarbiou"

15 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Identification of regulators of the myofibroblast phenotype of primary dermal fibroblasts from early diffuse systemic sclerosis patients.

Sci Rep 2019 03 14;9(1):4521. Epub 2019 Mar 14.

Biogen, Cambridge, MA, USA.

Systemic sclerosis (SSc or scleroderma) is an auto-immune disease characterized by skin fibrosis. While primary cells from patients are considered as a unique resource to better understand human disease biology, the effect of in vitro culture on these cells and their evaluation as a platform to identify disease regulators remain poorly characterized. The goal of our studies was to provide insights into the utility of SSc dermal fibroblast primary cells for therapeutic target discovery. The disease phenotypes of freshly isolated and in vitro cultured SSc dermal fibroblasts were characterized using whole transcriptome profiling, alpha smooth muscle actin (ASMA) expression and cell impedance. SSc dermal fibroblasts retained most of the molecular disease phenotype upon in vitro culture for at least four cell culture passages (approximatively 10 cell doublings). We validated an RNA interference high throughput assay that successfully identified genes affecting the myofibroblast phenotype of SSc skin fibroblasts. These genes included MKL1, RHOA and LOXL2 that were previously proposed as therapeutic anti-fibrotic target, and ITGA5, that has been less studied in fibrosis biology and may be a novel potential modifier of SSc fibroblast biology. Together our results demonstrated the value of carefully-phenotyped SSc dermal fibroblasts as a platform for SSc target and drug discovery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-41153-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6418101PMC
March 2019

Antisense Long Non-Coding RNAs Are Deregulated in Skin Tissue of Patients with Systemic Sclerosis.

J Invest Dermatol 2018 04 24;138(4):826-835. Epub 2017 Nov 24.

Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Systemic sclerosis is an autoimmune disease characterized by fibrosis of skin and multiple organs of which the pathogenesis is poorly understood. We studied differentially expressed coding and non-coding genes in relation to systemic sclerosis pathogenesis with a specific focus on antisense non-coding RNAs. Skin biopsy-derived RNAs from 14 early systemic sclerosis patients and six healthy individuals were sequenced with ion-torrent and analyzed using DEseq2. Overall, 4,901 genes with a fold change >1.5 and a false discovery rate <5% were detected in patients versus controls. Upregulated genes clustered in immunologic, cell adhesion, and keratin-related processes. Interestingly, 676 deregulated non-coding genes were detected, 257 of which were classified as antisense genes. Sense genes expressed opposite of these antisense genes were also deregulated in 42% of the observed sense-antisense gene pairs. The majority of the antisense genes had a similar effect sizes in an independent North American dataset with three genes (CTBP1-AS2, OTUD6B-AS1, and AGAP2-AS1) exceeding the study-wide Bonferroni-corrected P-value (P < 0.0023, P = 1.1 × 10, 1.4 × 10, 1.7 × 10, respectively). In this study, we highlight that together with coding genes, (antisense) long non-coding RNAs are deregulated in skin tissue of systemic sclerosis patients suggesting a novel class of genes involved in pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jid.2017.09.053DOI Listing
April 2018

Antibacterial Defense of Human Airway Epithelial Cells from Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients Induced by Acute Exposure to Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae: Modulation by Cigarette Smoke.

J Innate Immun 2017 8;9(4):359-374. Epub 2017 Feb 8.

Department of Pulmonology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Antimicrobial proteins and peptides (AMPs) are a central component of the antibacterial activity of airway epithelial cells. It has been proposed that a decrease in antibacterial lung defense contributes to an increased susceptibility to microbial infection in smokers and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, whether reduced AMP expression in the epithelium contributes to this lower defense is largely unknown. We investigated the bacterial killing activity and expression of AMPs by air-liquid interface-cultured primary bronchial epithelial cells from COPD patients and non-COPD (ex-)smokers that were stimulated with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). In addition, the effect of cigarette smoke on AMP expression and the activation of signaling pathways was determined. COPD cell cultures displayed reduced antibacterial activity, whereas smoke exposure suppressed the NTHi-induced expression of AMPs and further increased IL-8 expression in COPD and non-COPD cultures. Moreover, smoke exposure impaired NTHi-induced activation of NF-κB, but not MAP-kinase signaling. Our findings demonstrate that the antibacterial activity of cultured airway epithelial cells induced by acute bacterial exposure was reduced in COPD and suppressed by cigarette smoke, whereas inflammatory responses persisted. These findings help to explain the imbalance between protective antibacterial and destructive inflammatory innate immune responses in COPD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000455193DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5569706PMC
June 2018

Small hydrophobic protein of human metapneumovirus does not affect virus replication and host gene expression in vitro.

PLoS One 2013 6;8(3):e58572. Epub 2013 Mar 6.

Department of Viroscience, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) encodes a small hydrophobic (SH) protein of unknown function. HMPV from which the SH open reading frame was deleted (HMPVΔSH) was viable and displayed similar replication kinetics, cytopathic effect and plaque size compared with wild type HMPV in several cell-lines. In addition, no differences were observed in infection efficiency or cell-to-cell spreading in human primary bronchial epithelial cells (HPBEC) cultured at an air-liquid interphase. Host gene expression was analyzed in A549 cells infected with HMPV or HMPVΔSH using microarrays and mass spectrometry (MS) based techniques at multiple time points post infection. Only minor differences were observed in mRNA or protein expression levels. A possible function of HMPV SH as apoptosis blocker, as proposed for several members of the family Paramyxoviridae, was rejected based on this analysis. So far, a clear phenotype of HMPV SH deletion mutants in vitro at the virus and host levels is absent.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0058572PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3590193PMC
September 2013

Lentiviral small hairpin RNA delivery reduces apical sodium channel activity in differentiated human airway epithelial cells.

J Gene Med 2012 Dec;14(12):733-45

Department of Cell Biology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Background: Epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) hyperactivity has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF) by dysregulation of fluid and electrolytes in the airways. In the present study, we show proof-of-principle for ENaC inhibition by lentiviral-mediated RNA interference.

Methods: Immortalized normal (H441) and CF mutant (CFBE) airway cells, and differentiated human bronchial epithelial cells in air liquid interface culture (HBEC-ALI) were transduced with a vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein pseudotyped lentiviral (LV) vector expressing a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting the α subunit of ENaC (ENaCα), and a marker gene. Efficacy of ENaCα down-regulation was assayed by the real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), membrane potential assay, western blotting, short-circuit currents and fluid absorption. Off-target effects were investigated by a lab-on-a-chip quantitative PCR array.

Results: Transduction to near one hundred percentage efficiency of H441, CFBE and HBEC-ALI was achieved by the addition of the LV vector before differentiation and polarization. Transduction resulted in the inhibition of ENaCα mRNA and antigen expression, and a proportional decrease in ENaC-dependent short circuit current and fluid transport. No effect on transepithelial resistance or cAMP-induced secretion responses was observed in HBEC-ALI. The production of interferon α and pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA, indicating Toll-like receptor 3 or RNA-induced silencing complex mediated off-target effects, was not observed in HBEC-ALI transduced with this vector.

Conclusions: We have established a generic method for studying the effect of RNA interference in HBEC-ALI using standard lentiviral vectors. Down-regulation of ENaCα by lentiviral shRNA expression vectors as shown in the absence off-target effects has potential therapeutic value in the treatment of cystic fibrosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jgm.2672DOI Listing
December 2012

Cellular players in lung fibrosis.

Curr Pharm Des 2012 ;18(27):4093-102

Galapagos BV, AC Leiden, The Netherlands.

Pathogenic mechanisms involved in fibrosis of various organs share many common features. Myofibroblasts are thought to play a major role in fibrosis through excessive deposition of extracellular matrix during wound healing processes. Myofibroblasts are observed in fibrotic lesions, and whereas these derive from the hepatic stellate cells in liver, in lung they appear to originate from fibroblasts. The source of these fibroblasts has been the object of numerous studies over the recent years and points towards multiple sources. First of all, resident fibroblasts are thought to differentiate into the more contractile myofibroblasts, secreting many extracellular matrix proteins. Secondly, the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of epithelial cells may also account for increased numbers of fibroblasts, though in vivo evidence in patient tissue is still scarce. Thirdly, the enigmatic fibrocytes, stemming from the bone marrow, may also account for increasing numbers of fibroblasts in fibrotic lesions. These pathogenic processes are further augmented by the generation of so-called alternatively activated macrophages, which have direct and indirect effects on myofibroblast accumulation and collagen deposition. TGFβ, which is produced predominantly by macrophages, plays a central role in all these processes by inducing EMT, driving differentiation of fibrocytes, and differentiation towards myofibroblasts. This review describes the potential origins and roles of these fibrotic cells in the lung and discusses models to study these cells in vitro. These models offer innovative approaches in target and drug discovery, aiming to uncover novel therapeutic targets that regulate the profibrotic phenotype of these cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/138161212802430396DOI Listing
March 2013

Mouse models of cystic fibrosis: phenotypic analysis and research applications.

J Cyst Fibros 2011 Jun;10 Suppl 2:S152-71

Erasmus MC, Biochemistry Department, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Genetically modified mice have been studied for more than fifteen years as models of cystic fibrosis (CF). The large amount of experimental data generated illuminates the complex multi-organ pathology of CF and raises new questions relevant to human disease. CF mice have also been used to test experimental therapies prior to clinical trials. This review recapitulates the major phenotypic traits of CF mice and highlights important new findings including aberrant alveolar macrophages, bone and cartilage abnormalities and abnormal bioactive lipid metabolism. Novel data are presented on the intestinal and nasal physiology of F508del-CFTR CF mice backcrossed onto different genetic backgrounds. Caveats, and sources of variability including age, gender and animal husbandry, are discussed. Interspecies differences limit comparison of lung pathology in CF mice to the human disease. The recent development of genetically modified pigs and ferrets heralds the application of more advanced animal models to CF research and drug development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1569-1993(11)60020-9DOI Listing
June 2011

Delivery of DNA and siRNA by novel gemini-like amphiphilic peptides.

J Control Release 2010 Jul 8;145(1):33-9. Epub 2010 Apr 8.

Department of Organic Chemistry, Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

We report the design, synthesis, and characterization of a novel type of cationic lipopeptide, gemini-like amphiphilic peptides or 'geminoids'. As an example, the SPKR peptide, inspired by biological nucleic acid binding motifs, was appended with unsaturated (oleoyl/oleyl) alkyl tails. The compound shows remarkable DNA and siRNA delivery, without lysogenic helper lipid, in a variety of cells, with a moderate cytotoxic effect. It aggregates to nanoparticles that combine with DNA to lipoplexes, which undergo a change from lamellar to the more lysogenic hexagonal packing upon lowering the pH. The versatility of the chemical approach allowed us to study peptides related to SPKR, and to establish that the Pro and at least one of the cationic (Lys, Arg) residues are essential for the biological activity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jconrel.2010.03.028DOI Listing
July 2010

Proteomic analysis of naphthalene-induced airway epithelial injury and repair in a cystic fibrosis mouse model.

J Proteome Res 2009 Jul;8(7):3606-16

Department of Cell Biology, Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Combined results from laser capture microdissection of mouse airway epithelial cells followed by high power (MALDI-FTICR) MS, and fluorescent two-dimensional gel elctrophoresis (2D-DIGE) of the whole lung, allowed us to identify proteins differentially expressed after naphthalene induced airway injury. Further, we discovered several novel aspects of Cystic Fibrosis (CF) lung pathology in an F508del-Cftr mouse model using this approach. The combined MALDI-FTICR-MS and 2D-DIGE data show that lung carbonyl reductase (CBR2), involved in prostaglandin metabolism, converting PGE2 to PGF2alpha, is localized to airway cells and is reduced 2-fold in mutant mice compared to normal, both before and after challenge. Further, we observe a downregulation of two key enzymes of retinoic acid metabolism after injury, which is more pronounced in CF mutant mice. These data show that state-of-the-art proteomics can be used to evaluate airway injury in small cell samples. Further, the results suggest the involvement of prostaglandin and retinoic acid metabolism in the abnormal responses of CF mutant mice to injury.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/pr900021mDOI Listing
July 2009

Effects of cigarette smoke condensate on proliferation and wound closure of bronchial epithelial cells in vitro: role of glutathione.

Respir Res 2005 Nov 25;6:140. Epub 2005 Nov 25.

Department of Pulmonology, Leiden University Medical Center, PO Box 9600, 2300RC, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Background: Increased airway epithelial proliferation is frequently observed in smokers. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms leading to these epithelial changes, we studied the effect of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) on cell proliferation, wound closure and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation. We also studied whether modulation of intracellular glutathione/thiol levels could attenuate CSC-induced cell proliferation.

Methods: Cells of the bronchial epithelial cell line NCI-H292 and subcultures of primary bronchial epithelial cells were used for the present study. The effect of CSC on epithelial proliferation was assessed using 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation. Modulation of epithelial wound repair was studied by analysis of closure of 3 mm circular scrape wounds during 72 hours of culture. Wound closure was calculated from digital images obtained at 24 h intervals. Activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases was assessed by Western blotting using phospho-specific antibodies.

Results: At low concentrations CSC increased proliferation of NCI-H292 cells, whereas high concentrations were inhibitory as a result of cytotoxicity. Low concentrations of CSC also increased epithelial wound closure of both NCI-H292 and PBEC, whereas at high concentrations closure was inhibited. At low, mitogenic concentrations, CSC caused persistent activation of ERK1/2, a MAPK involved in cell proliferation. Inhibition of cell proliferation by high concentrations of CSC was associated with activation of the pro-apoptotic MAP kinases p38 and JNK. Modulation of intracellular glutathione (GSH)/thiol levels using N-acetyl-L-cysteine, GSH or buthionine sulphoximine (BSO), demonstrated that both the stimulatory and the inhibitory effects of CSC were regulated in part by intracellular GSH levels.

Conclusion: These results indicate that CSC may increase cell proliferation and wound closure dependent on the local concentration of cigarette smoke and the anti-oxidant status. These findings are consistent with increased epithelial proliferation in smokers, and may provide further insight in the development of lung cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1465-9921-6-140DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1315328PMC
November 2005

NF-kappaB mediated IL-6 production by renal epithelial cells is regulated by c-jun NH2-terminal kinase.

J Am Soc Nephrol 2005 Jun 20;16(6):1603-11. Epub 2005 Apr 20.

Department of Nephrology, Leiden University Medical Center, Building 1, C3P, Albinusdreef 2, 2333 ZA Leiden, The Netherlands.

Tubular epithelial cells (TEC) play an important role in tubulointerstitial inflammation, a hallmark of most renal diseases, via production of cytokines and chemokines. In this study, the role of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) in regulation of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 in cultured human TEC in response to the leukocyte-derived factors IL-1, TNF-alpha, IL-17, and CD40L was investigated. IL-6 production induced by IL-1, TNF-alpha, and IL-17 was specifically inhibited by the c-jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor SP600125, but not by a selective inhibitor of p38 MAPK, and was moderately increased when the ERK1/2 pathway was inhibited. Also for CD40L stimulation, inhibition of JNK resulted in a pronounced inhibition of IL-6 production. Although stimulation of TEC induced activation of activator protein-1 (AP-1), the down-stream target of JNK, reporter assays demonstrated that mutation of the AP-1 binding site in the IL-6 promoter did not affect gene transcription. Furthermore, IL-1-induced transcriptional activation of the IL-6 promotor was repressed by SP600125 or by co-transfection of a dominant-negative expression plasmid of c-jun even in the absence of a functional AP-1 binding site. This suggests that IL-6 production by renal epithelial cells is regulated by JNK, via a mechanism, however, independent of the AP-1 binding site. The data rather suggest that the JNK pathway may interfere with other signaling pathways, involving NF-kappaB and possibly ERK.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1681/ASN.2004090781DOI Listing
June 2005

The antimicrobial peptide LL-37 activates innate immunity at the airway epithelial surface by transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

J Immunol 2003 Dec;171(12):6690-6

Department of Pulmonology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Antimicrobial peptides produced by epithelial cells and neutrophils represent essential elements of innate immunity, and include the defensin and cathelicidin family of antimicrobial polypeptides. The human cathelicidin cationic antimicrobial protein-18 is an antimicrobial peptide precursor predominantly expressed in neutrophils, and its active peptide LL-37 is released from the precursor through the action of neutrophil serine proteinases. LL-37 has been shown to display antimicrobial activity against a broad spectrum of microorganisms, to neutralize LPS bioactivity, and to chemoattract neutrophils, monocytes, mast cells, and T cells. In this study we show that LL-37 activates airway epithelial cells as demonstrated by activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and increased release of IL-8. Epithelial cell activation was inhibited by the MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitors PD98059 and U0126, by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG1478, by blocking anti-EGFR and anti-EGFR-ligand Abs, and by the metalloproteinase inhibitor GM6001. These data suggest that LL-37 transactivates the EGFR via metalloproteinase-mediated cleavage of membrane-anchored EGFR-ligands. LL-37 may thus constitute one of the mediators by which neutrophils regulate epithelial cell activity in the lung.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4049/jimmunol.171.12.6690DOI Listing
December 2003

Neutrophil defensins enhance lung epithelial wound closure and mucin gene expression in vitro.

Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 2004 Feb 18;30(2):193-201. Epub 2003 Jul 18.

Department of Pulmonology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Human airways are frequently exposed to potentially harmful agents that cause tissue injury. Upon such injury, a repair process is initiated that comprises cell migration, proliferation, and differentiation. We have previously shown that human neutrophil defensins (human neutrophil peptides 1-3 [HNP1-3]) induce airway epithelial cell proliferation. Because of the role of cell proliferation in epithelial wound repair, we investigated the effect of HNP1-3 on airway epithelial wound closure and mucin gene expression in vitro. Using NCI-H292 airway epithelial cell cultures, we demonstrated that HNP1-3 cause a dose- and time-dependent increase of wound closure as well as increased cell migration. Furthermore, HNP1-3 caused a biphasic activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase extracellular-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2). Both the effects of HNP1-3 on wound closure and ERK1/2 activation were blocked by specific inhibitors of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase MEK, whereas inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and Src did block defensin-enhanced wound closure but not ERK1/2 activation. Finally, HNP1-3 increased mRNA encoding the mucins MUC5B and MUC5AC, suggesting a role for defensins in mucous cell differentiation. These results indicate that neutrophil defensins increase epithelial wound repair in vitro, which involves migration and proliferation, and mucin production. Neutrophil defensin-enhanced wound repair appears to require epidermal growth factor receptor activation and downstream signaling pathways.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1165/rcmb.2002-0267OCDOI Listing
February 2004

Role of defensins in inflammatory lung disease.

Ann Med 2002 ;34(2):96-101

Department of Pulmonology, Leiden University Medical Center, The Netherlands.

The human airways are protected from invading micro-organisms by the highly efficient innate immune system. Antimicrobial peptides that are produced by inflammatory cells and airway epithelial cells are key elements in this innate immune system. A major subgroup of the antimicrobial peptides is the family of defensins--small non-enzymatic and cationic peptides. Besides their extensively studied role in antimicrobial defense, recent studies have demonstrated that defensins are also able to modulate inflammatory responses, to stimulate adaptive immunity and contribute to tissue repair. In line with these observations, increased defensin levels were observed in inflammatory lung diseases, such as cystic fibrosis (CF), diffuse panbroncheolitis (DPB), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and in infectious diseases. In the past decade much has been learnt about the activity of defensins and there is abundant evidence for their presence in human inflammatory lung disease. Future studies are required to elucidate their role in the pathogenesis of these diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07853890252953482DOI Listing
December 2002

Human neutrophil defensins induce lung epithelial cell proliferation in vitro.

J Leukoc Biol 2002 Jul;72(1):167-74

Departments of Pulmonology, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, 2333 ZA Leiden, The Netherlands.

Repair of injured airway epithelium is often accompanied by an influx of leukocytes, and these cells have been suggested to contribute to the repair process. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of neutrophil defensins--antimicrobial peptides present in large amounts in the neutrophil--on proliferation of cultured lung epithelial cells. Neutrophil defensins at 4-10 microg/ml enhanced proliferation of the A549 lung epithelial cell line as assessed using cell counting, BrdU incorporation, and the tetrazolium salt MTT assay. Higher, cytotoxic concentrations of defensins decreased cell proliferation. Whereas defensin-induced cell proliferation was not inhibited by the EGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG1478, it was completely inhibited by the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor U0126, suggesting that defensins mediate cell proliferation via an EGF receptor-independent, MAP kinase signaling pathway. Although the cytotoxic effect of defensins was inhibited by alpha1-proteinase inhibitor, the defensin-induced cell proliferation was not affected. These data suggest that neutrophil defensins may possibly be involved in epithelial repair in the airways by inducing lung epithelial cell proliferation.
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July 2002
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