Publications by authors named "Inge V Aardestrup"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Small dense LDL particles--a predictor of coronary artery disease evaluated by invasive and CT-based techniques: a case-control study.

Lipids Health Dis 2011 Jan 25;10:21. Epub 2011 Jan 25.

Department of Cardiology, Center for Cardiovascular Research, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark.

Background: Coronary angiography is the current standard method to evaluate coronary atherosclerosis in patients with suspected angina pectoris, but non-invasive CT scanning of the coronaries are increasingly used for the same purpose. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and other lipid and lipoprotein variables are major risk factors for coronary artery disease. Small dense LDL particles may be of particular importance, but clinical studies evaluating their predictive value for coronary atherosclerosis are few.

Methods: We performed a study of 194 consecutive patients with chest pain, a priori considered of low to intermediate risk for significant coronary stenosis (>50% lumen obstruction) who were referred for elective coronary angiography. Plasma lipids and lipoproteins were measured including the subtype pattern of LDL particles, and all patients were examined by coronary CT scanning before coronary angiography.

Results: The proportion of small dense LDL was a strong univariate predictor of significant coronary artery stenosis evaluated by both methods. After adjustment for age, gender, smoking, and waist circumference only results obtained by traditional coronary angiography remained statistically significant.

Conclusion: Small dense LDL particles may add to risk stratification of patients with suspected angina pectoris.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1476-511X-10-21DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3038964PMC
January 2011

The incorporation of marine n-3 PUFA into platelets and adipose tissue in pre- and postmenopausal women: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

Br J Nutr 2010 Aug 25;104(3):318-25. Epub 2010 Mar 25.

Department of Oncology, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital, Hobrovej 18-22, Aalborg, Denmark.

The primary aim of the trial was to investigate the influence of menopause on the incorporation of marine n-3 PUFA into platelets and adipose tissue. A secondary aim was to evaluate whether marine n-3 PUFA may change levels of circulating oestrogens in women. Ninety-two pre- and postmenopausal women were randomly assigned to consume 2.2 g of marine n-3 PUFA or control oil daily for 12 weeks. Adipose tissue biopsies and blood samples were collected at baseline and after intervention. Eighty-nine women completed the study. Baseline contents of total marine n-3 PUFA and each of the major long-chained n-3 PUFA, EPA, docosapentaenoic acid and DHA were all significantly lower (P < 0.05) in the premenopausal group both in platelets and adipose tissue, except for EPA in platelets (P = 0.05). After supplementation with fish oil, the content of all marine n-3 PUFA increased significantly in platelets and adipose tissue in both pre- and postmenopausal women. The increase in platelets and adipose tissue was, however, the same in both groups. There was no effect of fish oil on oestrogen levels in postmenopausal women. We found a significant difference in premenopausal women, in whom oestradiol (P < 0.04) and oestrone (P < 0.02) serum concentrations increased after the fish oil supplement. This trial did not reveal any difference in the ability of pre- and postmenopausal women to incorporate marine n-3 PUFA into platelets or adipose tissue. However, supplementation with fish oil increased oestrogen levels in premenopausal women.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0007114510000371DOI Listing
August 2010

Fatty acid composition of plasma phospholipids and risk of prostate cancer in a case-control analysis nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

Am J Clin Nutr 2008 Nov;88(5):1353-63

Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.

Background: Plausible biological mechanisms underlie possible associations between fatty acids in blood and risk of prostate cancer; epidemiologic evidence for an association, however, is inconsistent.

Objective: The objectives were to assess the association between plasma phospholipid fatty acids and risk of total prostate cancer by stage and grade.

Design: This was a nested case-control analysis of 962 men with a diagnosis of prostate cancer after a median follow-up time of 4.2 y and 1061 matched controls who were taking part in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. The fatty acid composition of plasma phospholipids was measured by gas chromatography, and the risk of prostate cancer was estimated by using conditional logistic regression with adjustment for lifestyle variables.

Results: We found a positive association between palmitic acid and risk of total, localized, and low-grade prostate cancer. The risk of prostate cancer for men in the highest quintile compared with the lowest quintile of palmitic acid was 1.47 (95% CI: 0.97, 2.23; P for trend = 0.032). We found an inverse association between stearic acid and the risk of total, localized, and low-grade prostate cancer; men in the highest quintile of stearic acid had a relative risk of 0.77 (95% CI: 0.56, 1.06; P for trend = 0.03). There were significant positive associations between myristic, alpha-linolenic, and eicosapentaenoic acids and risk of high-grade prostate cancer.

Conclusion: The associations between palmitic, stearic, myristic, alpha-linolenic, and eicosapentaenoic acids and prostate cancer risk may reflect differences in intake or metabolism of these fatty acids between the precancer cases and controls and should be explored further.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.2008.26369DOI Listing
November 2008
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