Publications by authors named "Hyeonjin Kang"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Daily Life Changes and Life Satisfaction among Korean School-Aged Children in the COVID-19 Pandemic.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2021 03 23;18(6). Epub 2021 Mar 23.

Department of Child Development and Family Studies, College of Human Ecology, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Korea.

The recent COVID-19 pandemic has been disrupting the daily lives of people across the world, causing a major concern for psychological well-being in children. This study aimed to examine (1) how life satisfaction and its potential predictors have been affected by the pandemic among school-aged children in Korea, and (2) which factors would predict their life satisfaction during the pandemic. We surveyed 166 fourth-graders in the Seoul metropolitan area to assess their psychological well-being and potentially related variables during the pandemic. The data were compared with those available from two pre-COVID-19 surveys, the 2018 Korean Children and Youth Panel Survey ( = 1236) and the 2019 Korean Children and Youth Well-being Index Survey ( = 334). Higher levels of stress were observed in children during the COVID-19 pandemic; however, the level of their life satisfaction remained unchanged when compared with data from the pre-COVID-19 surveys. The pandemic also affected peer relationship quality and susceptibility to smartphone addiction, but not perceived parenting style nor academic engagement. Interestingly, peer relationship quality no longer predicted life satisfaction during the pandemic; perceived parenting styles and parent-child conversation time predicted life satisfaction. The results suggest a central role of parent-child relationship in supporting the psychological well-being of school-aged children during the pandemic.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18063324DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8004811PMC
March 2021

The Impact of Social Jetlag on Sleep Quality among Nurses: A Cross-Sectional Survey.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2020 12 23;18(1). Epub 2020 Dec 23.

Red Cross College of Nursing, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 06974, Korea.

Social jetlag (SJL) refers to an asynchrony between one's chronotype and social working hours, which can be detrimental to health. The current SJL situation in shift nurses who work in dysregulation is poorly understood. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate SJL during night shifts and identify the predictors of sleep quality in rotating shift nurses. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2018 on a sample of 132 shift-working nurses from two general hospitals in South Korea (the response rate was 88.8%). The SJL was measured with the Munich Chronotype Questionnaire, and sleep quality was measured with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and the Verran and Snyder-Halpern Sleep Scale. Data analysis was mainly based on a multiple regression, to identify SJL's influence on nurses' sleep quality. The average SJL during night shifts was 2 h and 3 min, and the average sleep duration during night shifts was 6 h 10 min. Multiple regression analysis revealed that SJL, day-shift fatigue, and sleep quality during night shifts affected nurses' sleep quality. These variables accounted for 24.7% of the variance in overall sleep quality. The study concluded that overall sleep quality can increase with decreasing day-shift fatigue, decreasing SJL, and increasing sleep quality on night shifts.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010047DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7793470PMC
December 2020

Risk of Kidney Dysfunction from Polypharmacy among Older Patients: A Nested Case-Control Study of the South Korean Senior Cohort.

Sci Rep 2019 07 18;9(1):10440. Epub 2019 Jul 18.

College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.

Polypharmacy, the concurrent use of multiple medicines, could increase the risk of kidney dysfunction among older adults because it likely burdens the aging kidneys to excrete multiple pharmaceutical ingredients and their metabolites. This study aimed to examine the relation between polypharmacy and kidney dysfunction among older patients. A nested case-control study was conducted using the National Health Insurance Service - Senior Cohort (NHIS-SC, 2009-2013), representative of the Korean senior population. It consisted of all health insurance claims linked to records of mandatory health examination. Kidney dysfunction was defined as having an eGFR lower than 60, with a decline rate of 10% or more compared to the baseline eGFR. Polypharmacy was defined based on daily counts of pharmaceutical ingredients during one year prior to the case's event date. It was classified into polypharmacy (five to 10 ingredients) and excessive polypharmacy (10 or more ingredients). After matching case and control groups based on a range of potential confounders, conditional logistic regression was performed incorporating adjustments on disease-specific, medication-specific, and lifestyle-related risk factors. The matching resulted in 14,577 pairs of cases and controls. Exposure to polypharmacy was significantly associated with increase in the risk of kidney dysfunction; i.e., crude model (polypharmacy: OR = 1.572, 95% CI = 1.492-1.656; excessive polypharmacy: OR = 2.069, 95% CI = 1.876-2.283) and risk adjustment model (polypharmacy: OR = 1.213, 95% CI = 1.139-1.292; excessive polypharmacy: OR = 1.461, 95% CI = 1.303-1.639). The significant associations were robust across different definitions of kidney dysfunction. These findings inform healthcare providers and policy makers of the importance of polypharmacy prevention to protect older adults from kidney dysfunction.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-46849-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6639333PMC
July 2019

The mediatory role of medication adherence in improving patients' medication experience through patient-physician communication among older hypertensive patients.

Patient Prefer Adherence 2017 5;11:1119-1126. Epub 2017 Jul 5.

Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.

Background: Understanding how patient-physician communication affects patients' medication experience would help hypertensive patients maintain their regular long-term medication therapy. This study aimed to examine whether patient-physician communication (information and interpersonal treatment) affects patients' medication experience directly or indirectly through changing medication adherence for each of the two communication domains.

Methods: A self-administered cross-sectional survey was conducted for older patients who had visited a community senior center as a member. Two communication domains were assessed using two subscales of the Primary Care Assessment Survey. Medication adherence and experience were measured using the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale and a five-point Likert scale, respectively. Mediatory effects were assessed via Baron and Kenny's procedure and a Sobel test.

Results: Patient-physician communication had a positive prediction on patients' medication experience (β=0.25, =0.03), and this was fully mediated by medication adherence (=3.62, <0.001). Of the two components of patient-physician communication, only informative communication showed a mediatory effect (=2.21, =0.03).

Conclusion: Patient-physician communication, specifically informative communication, had the potential to improve patients' medication experience via changes in medication adherence. This finding can inform health care stakeholders of the mediatory role of medication adherence in ensuring favorable medication experience for older hypertensive patients by fostering informative patient-physician communication.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/PPA.S137263DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5505608PMC
July 2017
-->