Publications by authors named "Hee-Dong Yoon"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Potential and efficiency of statistical learning closely intertwined with individuals' executive functions: a mathematical modeling study.

Sci Rep 2020 11 2;10(1):18843. Epub 2020 Nov 2.

Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST), Daegu, Republic of Korea.

Statistical learning (SL) is essential in enabling humans to extract probabilistic regularities from the world. The ability to accomplish ultimate learning performance with training (i.e., the potential of learning) has been known to be dissociated with performance improvement per amount of learning time (i.e., the efficiency of learning). Here, we quantified the potential and efficiency of SL separately through mathematical modeling and scrutinized how they were affected by various executive functions. Our results showed that a high potential of SL was associated with poor inhibition and good visuo-spatial working memory, whereas high efficiency of SL was closely related to good inhibition and good set-shifting. We unveiled the distinct characteristics of SL in relation to potential and efficiency and their interaction with executive functions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-75157-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7606401PMC
November 2020

Syntactic Comprehension of Relative Clauses and Center Embedding Using Pseudowords.

Brain Sci 2020 Mar 31;10(4). Epub 2020 Mar 31.

Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST), Daegu 42988, Korea.

Relative clause (RC) formation and center embedding (CE) are two primary syntactic operations fundamental for creating and understanding complex sentences. Ample evidence from previous cross-linguistic studies has revealed several similarities and differences between RC and CE. However, it is not easy to investigate the effect of pure syntactic constraints for RC and CE without the interference of semantic and pragmatic interactions. Here, we show how readers process CE and RC using a self-paced reading task in Korean. More interestingly, we adopted a novel self-paced pseudoword reading task to exploit syntactic operations of the RC and CE, eliminating the semantic and pragmatic interference in sentence comprehension. Our results showed that the main effects of RC and CE conform to previous studies. Furthermore, we found a facilitation effect of sentence comprehension when we combined an RC and CE in a complex sentence. Our study provides a valuable insight into how the purely syntactic processing of RC and CE assists comprehension of complex sentences.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/brainsci10040202DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7226570PMC
March 2020

Low-dose propofol infusion for sedation during local anesthesia.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2002 Mar;109(3):956-63

Department of Anesthesiology, College of Medicine, Korea University Ansan Hospital, 516 Gogan-Dong, Ansan-City, Kyong gi-Do, 425-020 Republic of Korea.

The safety and efficacy of lose-dose propofol for sedation were investigated on 90 consenting patients who had undergone surgical procedures with local anesthesia. After being premedicated with intravenous midazolam 0.05 mg.kg(-1), all patients were randomly divided into two groups and received intravenously either a loading dose of propofol 0.8 mg.kg(-1) followed by a continuous infusion of propofol 30 microg.kg(-1)min(-1) (propofol group) or an equivalent volume of saline (placebo group) during operation. Study groups were compared with respect to the level of sedation, hemodynamic variables, oxygen saturation, and the incidence of intraoperative side effects. In addition, the discharge time and the satisfaction of both patients and surgeons with this sedative technique were assessed. Propofol reduced patients' discomfort and lowered their arterial pressure and heart rate during the infiltration of local anesthetics. It also promoted an adequate level of sedation without clinically significant oxygen desaturation in the intraoperative period. Surgeons and patients in the propofol group showed a higher level of satisfaction than those in the placebo group. There was no significant difference between the two groups with regard to the incidence of adverse effects and the discharge time. In conclusion, it was found that the use of low-dose propofol infusion was a safe and effective sedative technique for local anesthesia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00006534-200203000-00023DOI Listing
March 2002