Publications by authors named "Hamayun Nawaz"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Global breast cancer seasonality.

Breast Cancer Res Treat 2010 Aug 4;123(1):233-43. Epub 2010 Feb 4.

Medical Chronobiological Laboratory, Dorn Research Institute, WJB Dorn VA Medical Center, School of Medicine and School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, 6439 Garners Ferry Road, Columbia, SC 29209, USA.

Human breast cancer incidence has seasonal patterns that seem to vary among global populations. The aggregate monthly frequency of breast cancer diagnosis was collected and examined for 2,921,714 breast cancer cases diagnosed across 64 global regions over spans from 2 to 53 years. Breast cancer is consistently diagnosed more often in spring and fall, both in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, regardless of presumable menopausal status (50). This seasonality is increasingly more prominent as population distance from the equator increases and this latitude dependence is most pronounced among women living in rural areas. Moreover, the overall annual incidence (2005-2006), per 100,000 population, of breast cancer increased as the latitude of population residence increased. These data make it clear that human breast cancer discovery occurs non-randomly throughout each year with peaks near both equinoxes and valleys near both solstices. This stable global breast cancer seasonality has implications for better prevention, more accurate screening, earlier diagnosis, and more effective treatment. This complex latitude-dependent breast cancer seasonality is clearly related to predictable local day/night length changes which occur seasonally. Its mechanism may depend upon seasonal sunlight mediation of vitamin D and seasonal mediation of nocturnal melatonin peak level and duration.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10549-009-0676-7DOI Listing
August 2010

Mentioning race at the beginning of clinical case presentations: a survey of US medical schools.

Med Educ 2009 Feb;43(2):146-54

Department of Medicine, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, South Carolina 29203, USA.

Objectives: Medical students and doctors in the USA frequently mention the patient's race at the beginning of oral or written clinical case presentations. However, this practice is controversial. We aimed to determine whether US medical schools explicitly teach students to mention race at the beginning of case presentations, and to collect additional information on the schools' perspectives on this practice.

Methods: An Internet-based questionnaire was submitted to directors of courses on history taking and physical examination at all US medical schools.

Results: The response rate was 85%. Students are taught to mention race routinely at 11% of schools and selectively at 63% of schools; this practice is discouraged at 9% of schools and not addressed at 18% of schools. Most respondents noted that resident doctors at their institutions routinely mention race at the beginning of case presentations. Even at schools in which mentioning race is discouraged or not addressed, students tend to include race during their clinical rotations. Respondents were divided on whether a standardised approach to inclusion of race should exist at US schools.

Conclusions: Teaching about inclusion or exclusion of race in the opening statement of clinical case presentations varies across US medical schools. This variation presents an opportunity for medical educators to discuss tensions between stereotyping and cultural competence in medical education.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2923.2008.03257.xDOI Listing
February 2009

Kayla.

Authors:
Hamayun Nawaz

Ann Intern Med 2007 Apr;146(7):535-6

University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, South Carolina 29209, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.7326/0003-4819-146-7-200704030-00012DOI Listing
April 2007

Seeing patients with new eyes: a medical student's path to palliative medicine through a camera's lens.

J Palliat Med 2007 Feb;10(1):253-5

University of South Carolina School of Medicine, 1217 Taylor Street, Columbia, SC 29201, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/jpm.2006.0181DOI Listing
February 2007

Disseminated gonococcal infection in pregnancy presenting as meningitis and dermatitis.

Obstet Gynecol 2006 Sep;108(3 Pt 2):798-801

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC 29203, USA.

Background: In 2003, the reported gonorrhea rate among women was 118.8 per 100,000 women. Most gonococcal infections in pregnant women are asymptomatic or produce a mildly symptomatic genital infection. Disseminated infections can occur when gonococcal bacteremia produces extragenital symptoms, most commonly arthritis.

Case: A patient presented in the third trimester of pregnancy with fever, body aches, neck soreness, and skin lesions. There was no arthritis. Cultures performed during evaluation confirmed extragenital Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

Conclusion: A high index of suspicion is necessary to diagnose disseminated gonococcal infection and prevent disease sequelae.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.AOG.0000209186.84897.f1DOI Listing
September 2006